E J Kunkel

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Leukocyte arrest during cytokine-dependent inflammation in vivo
    E J Kunkel
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA
    J Immunol 164:3301-8. 2000
  2. ncbi request reprint Plasma-cell homing
    Eric J Kunkel
    BioSeek, Inc, Burlingame, California 94010, USA
    Nat Rev Immunol 3:822-9. 2003
  3. ncbi request reprint Chemokines and the tissue-specific migration of lymphocytes
    Eric J Kunkel
    Laboratory of Immunology and Vascular Biology, Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Immunity 16:1-4. 2002
  4. pmc Bonzo/CXCR6 expression defines type 1-polarized T-cell subsets with extralymphoid tissue homing potential
    C H Kim
    Laboratory of Immunology and Vascular Biology, Department of Pathology, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California, USA
    J Clin Invest 107:595-601. 2001
  5. ncbi request reprint Differential effect of E-selectin antibodies on neutrophil rolling and recruitment to inflammatory sites
    C L Ramos
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville 22908, USA
    Blood 89:3009-18. 1997
  6. ncbi request reprint The roles of L-selectin, beta 7 integrins, and P-selectin in leukocyte rolling and adhesion in high endothelial venules of Peyer's patches
    E J Kunkel
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville 22908, USA
    J Immunol 161:2449-56. 1998
  7. ncbi request reprint A novel chemokine ligand for CCR10 and CCR3 expressed by epithelial cells in mucosal tissues
    J Pan
    Laboratory of Immunology and Vascular Biology, Departments of Pathology and Surgery, and Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Immunol 165:2943-9. 2000
  8. ncbi request reprint CCR7 expression and memory T cell diversity in humans
    J J Campbell
    Joint Program in Transfusion Medicine, Children s Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    J Immunol 166:877-84. 2001
  9. ncbi request reprint Role of primary and secondary capture for leukocyte accumulation in vivo
    E J Kunkel
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville 22908, USA
    Circ Res 82:30-8. 1998
  10. pmc Rules of chemokine receptor association with T cell polarization in vivo
    C H Kim
    Laboratory of Immunology and Vascular Biology, Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Clin Invest 108:1331-9. 2001

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications25

  1. ncbi request reprint Leukocyte arrest during cytokine-dependent inflammation in vivo
    E J Kunkel
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA
    J Immunol 164:3301-8. 2000
    ..These data suggest a model of leukocyte recruitment in which beta2 integrins play a critical role in stabilizing leukocyte rolling during a protracted cellular activation period before arrest and firm adhesion...
  2. ncbi request reprint Plasma-cell homing
    Eric J Kunkel
    BioSeek, Inc, Burlingame, California 94010, USA
    Nat Rev Immunol 3:822-9. 2003
    ..By directing plasma-cell homing, chemokines might help to determine the character and efficiency of mucosal, inflammatory and systemic antibody responses...
  3. ncbi request reprint Chemokines and the tissue-specific migration of lymphocytes
    Eric J Kunkel
    Laboratory of Immunology and Vascular Biology, Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Immunity 16:1-4. 2002
    ..Constitutively expressed epithelial chemokines may help determine the character of local immune responses and contribute to the systemic organization of the immune system...
  4. pmc Bonzo/CXCR6 expression defines type 1-polarized T-cell subsets with extralymphoid tissue homing potential
    C H Kim
    Laboratory of Immunology and Vascular Biology, Department of Pathology, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California, USA
    J Clin Invest 107:595-601. 2001
    ..Bonzo may be important in trafficking of effector T cells that mediate type 1 inflammation, making it a potential target for therapeutic modulation of inflammatory diseases...
  5. ncbi request reprint Differential effect of E-selectin antibodies on neutrophil rolling and recruitment to inflammatory sites
    C L Ramos
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville 22908, USA
    Blood 89:3009-18. 1997
    ..Taken together, these results indicate that E-selectin serves a function, other than rolling, that appears to be critically important for neutrophil recruitment to inflammatory sites in Balb/c mice...
  6. ncbi request reprint The roles of L-selectin, beta 7 integrins, and P-selectin in leukocyte rolling and adhesion in high endothelial venules of Peyer's patches
    E J Kunkel
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville 22908, USA
    J Immunol 161:2449-56. 1998
    ..In situ, beta 7 integrins and L-selectin account for all lymphocyte homing to Peyer's patches, but P-selectin-dependent rolling, as induced by minimal trauma, may support trafficking of effector T lymphocytes to Peyer's patches...
  7. ncbi request reprint A novel chemokine ligand for CCR10 and CCR3 expressed by epithelial cells in mucosal tissues
    J Pan
    Laboratory of Immunology and Vascular Biology, Departments of Pathology and Surgery, and Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Immunol 165:2943-9. 2000
    ..Consistent with this, MEC attracts eosinophils in addition to memory lymphocyte subsets. These results suggest an important role for MEC in the physiology of extracutaneous epithelial tissues, including diverse mucosal organs...
  8. ncbi request reprint CCR7 expression and memory T cell diversity in humans
    J J Campbell
    Joint Program in Transfusion Medicine, Children s Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    J Immunol 166:877-84. 2001
    ..The ratio of CD27(neg)/CCR7(neg) cells to CD27(pos)/CCR7(pos) cells varies from tissue to tissue, and may correlate with the number of cells actively engaged in Ag recognition within a given tissue...
  9. ncbi request reprint Role of primary and secondary capture for leukocyte accumulation in vivo
    E J Kunkel
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville 22908, USA
    Circ Res 82:30-8. 1998
    ..Cluster formation appears to be dominated by areas of endothelium with a higher expression of E-selectin, because cluster formation is greatly reduced in E-selectin-deficient mice...
  10. pmc Rules of chemokine receptor association with T cell polarization in vivo
    C H Kim
    Laboratory of Immunology and Vascular Biology, Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Clin Invest 108:1331-9. 2001
    ..We conclude that the combinatorial expression of CKRs, which allow tissue- and subset-dependent targeting of effector cells during chemotactic navigation, defines physiologically significant subsets of polarized and nonpolarized T cells...
  11. pmc Absence of trauma-induced leukocyte rolling in mice deficient in both P-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule 1
    E J Kunkel
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville 22908, USA
    J Exp Med 183:57-65. 1996
    ..This severe defect in leukocyte rolling may explain the absence of leukocyte recruitment into the inflamed peritoneal cavity of P-selectin/ICAM-1-deficient mice at early time points (< or = 4 h)...
  12. pmc Integrating conflicting chemotactic signals. The role of memory in leukocyte navigation
    E F Foxman
    Laboratory of Immunology and Vascular Biology, Stanford University Medical School, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Cell Biol 147:577-88. 1999
    ....
  13. pmc Lymphocyte CC chemokine receptor 9 and epithelial thymus-expressed chemokine (TECK) expression distinguish the small intestinal immune compartment: Epithelial expression of tissue-specific chemokines as an organizing principle in regional immunity
    E J Kunkel
    Laboratory of Immunology and Vascular Biology, Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Exp Med 192:761-8. 2000
    ..Selective expression of chemokines by differentiated epithelium may represent an important mechanism for targeting and specialization of immune responses...
  14. ncbi request reprint Systems biology in drug discovery
    Eugene C Butcher
    Laboratory of Immunology and Vascular Biology, Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5324, USA
    Nat Biotechnol 22:1253-9. 2004
    ..These systems biology approaches promise to improve decision making in pharmaceutical development...
  15. ncbi request reprint Chemokines in lymphocyte trafficking and intestinal immunity
    Eric J Kunkel
    Laboratory of Immunology and Vascular Biology, Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Microcirculation 10:313-23. 2003
    ....
  16. pmc CCR10 expression is a common feature of circulating and mucosal epithelial tissue IgA Ab-secreting cells
    Eric J Kunkel
    Laboratory of Immunology and Vascular Biology, Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Clin Invest 111:1001-10. 2003
    ....
  17. ncbi request reprint A common mucosal chemokine (mucosae-associated epithelial chemokine/CCL28) selectively attracts IgA plasmablasts
    Nicole H Lazarus
    Laboratory of Immunology and Vascular Biology, Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5324, USA
    J Immunol 170:3799-805. 2003
    ..Surprisingly, T cells from mucosal sites fail to respond to MEC. These findings suggest a broad and unifying role for MEC in the physiology of the mucosal IgA immune system...
  18. pmc The intestinal chemokine thymus-expressed chemokine (CCL25) attracts IgA antibody-secreting cells
    Edward P Bowman
    Laboratory of Immunology and Vascular Biology, Department of Pathology and the Digestive Disease Center, Stanford University Medical School, Stanford, CA 94305 8444, USA
    J Exp Med 195:269-75. 2002
    ..The migration of IgA-ASC to the intestinal epithelial cell chemokine TECK may help target IgA-producing cells to the gut wall, thus helping define and segregate the intestinal immune response...
  19. ncbi request reprint Liver-infiltrating lymphocytes in end-stage hepatitis C virus: subsets, activation status, and chemokine receptor phenotypes
    Judie Boisvert
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Hepatol 38:67-75. 2003
    ..Chemokines and their receptors are important regulators of immunity, particularly in the migration and localization of circulating leukocytes within peripheral tissues...
  20. ncbi request reprint An integrative biology approach for analysis of drug action in models of human vascular inflammation
    Eric J Kunkel
    BioSeek, Inc, Burlingame, California 94010, USA
    FASEB J 18:1279-81. 2004
    ..BioMAP profiling can allow integration of meaningful human biology into drug development programs...
  21. pmc Maturation and trafficking markers on rotavirus-specific B cells during acute infection and convalescence in children
    Maria C Jaimes
    V A Palo Alto Health Care System, 3801 Miranda Ave, MC154C, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
    J Virol 78:10967-76. 2004
    ..Interestingly, RV memory cells generally lack CCR9 and CCR10 and instead express CCR6, which may enable recruitment to diverse epithelial sites of inflammation...
  22. pmc Expression of the chemokine receptors CCR4, CCR5, and CXCR3 by human tissue-infiltrating lymphocytes
    Eric J Kunkel
    Laboratory of Immunology and Vascular Biology, Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Am J Pathol 160:347-55. 2002
    ....
  23. ncbi request reprint Approaches to the analysis of cell signaling networks and their application in drug discovery
    Ellen L Berg
    BioSeek Inc, Burlingame, CA 94010, USA
    Curr Opin Drug Discov Devel 8:107-14. 2005
    ..In this review, experimental and computational methods for modeling complex CSNs and the applications of these approaches to pharmaceutical drug discovery are discussed...
  24. ncbi request reprint Characterization of compound mechanisms and secondary activities by BioMAP analysis
    Ellen L Berg
    BioSeek, Inc, 863 C Mitten Rd, Burlingame, CA 94010, USA
    J Pharmacol Toxicol Methods 53:67-74. 2006
    ....
  25. ncbi request reprint Systems biology in drug discovery
    Eric J Kunkel
    BioSeek Inc, Burlingame, CA 94010, USA
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 1:37. 2006