Dale Kaiser

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint A microbial genetic journey
    Dale Kaiser
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Microbiol 60:1-25. 2006
  2. pmc Distinguishing features of delta-proteobacterial genomes
    Samuel Karlin
    Department of Mathematics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:11352-7. 2006
  3. pmc Computational prediction of human metabolic pathways from the complete human genome
    Pedro Romero
    Bioinformatics Research Group, SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Ave, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA
    Genome Biol 6:R2. 2005
  4. pmc Dynamics of fruiting body morphogenesis
    Dale Kaiser
    Departments of Biochemistry and Developmental Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Bacteriol 186:919-27. 2004
  5. ncbi request reprint Bacterial swarming: a re-examination of cell-movement patterns
    Dale Kaiser
    Departments of Biochemistry and Developmental Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Curr Biol 17:R561-70. 2007
  6. ncbi request reprint Signaling in myxobacteria
    Dale Kaiser
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Microbiol 58:75-98. 2004
  7. ncbi request reprint Polar assembly of the type IV pilus secretin in Myxococcus xanthus
    Eric Nudleman
    Department of Developmental Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, B300 Beckman Center, 279 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Microbiol 60:16-29. 2006
  8. pmc Enhancer-binding proteins with a forkhead-associated domain and the sigma54 regulon in Myxococcus xanthus fruiting body development
    Lars Jelsbak
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:3010-5. 2005
  9. pmc Myxobacteria, polarity, and multicellular morphogenesis
    Dale Kaiser
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol 2:a000380. 2010
  10. ncbi request reprint Cell-to-cell transfer of bacterial outer membrane lipoproteins
    Eric Nudleman
    Departments of Developmental Biology and Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, B300 Beckman Center, 279 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Science 309:125-7. 2005

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications28

  1. ncbi request reprint A microbial genetic journey
    Dale Kaiser
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Microbiol 60:1-25. 2006
    ..We identified two cell-to-cell signals used to coordinate development. We have elucidated, in part, the signal transduction pathway for C-signal that directs the morphogenesis of a fruiting body...
  2. pmc Distinguishing features of delta-proteobacterial genomes
    Samuel Karlin
    Department of Mathematics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:11352-7. 2006
    ..The predicted highly expressed genes from delta genomes reflect their different ecologies, metabolic strategies, and adaptations...
  3. pmc Computational prediction of human metabolic pathways from the complete human genome
    Pedro Romero
    Bioinformatics Research Group, SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Ave, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA
    Genome Biol 6:R2. 2005
    ..Pathway assignments place genes in their larger biological context, and are a necessary first step toward quantitative modeling of metabolism...
  4. pmc Dynamics of fruiting body morphogenesis
    Dale Kaiser
    Departments of Biochemistry and Developmental Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Bacteriol 186:919-27. 2004
    ..Although fruiting bodies are relatively large structures that contain 10(5) cells, no long-range interactions between cells were evident. For aggregation, M. xanthus appears to use local interactions between its cells...
  5. ncbi request reprint Bacterial swarming: a re-examination of cell-movement patterns
    Dale Kaiser
    Departments of Biochemistry and Developmental Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Curr Biol 17:R561-70. 2007
    ..By identifying patterns of movement that are common to swarms making use of different engines, a model of swarm choreography can be proposed...
  6. ncbi request reprint Signaling in myxobacteria
    Dale Kaiser
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Microbiol 58:75-98. 2004
    ..Traveling waves, streams, and sporulation have increasing thresholds for C-signal activity, and this progression ensures that spores form inside fruiting bodies...
  7. ncbi request reprint Polar assembly of the type IV pilus secretin in Myxococcus xanthus
    Eric Nudleman
    Department of Developmental Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, B300 Beckman Center, 279 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Microbiol 60:16-29. 2006
    ..We suggest that these proteins are parts of a polar superstructure that holds PilQ monomers in a cluster and ready for Tgl to bring about secretin assembly...
  8. pmc Enhancer-binding proteins with a forkhead-associated domain and the sigma54 regulon in Myxococcus xanthus fruiting body development
    Lars Jelsbak
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:3010-5. 2005
    ..Because FHA domains respond to phosphothreonine-containing proteins, these results suggest a regulatory link to the abundant Ser/Thr protein kinases in M. xanthus...
  9. pmc Myxobacteria, polarity, and multicellular morphogenesis
    Dale Kaiser
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol 2:a000380. 2010
    ..Developmental gene expression is regulated by a network that is connected to the suppression of reversals...
  10. ncbi request reprint Cell-to-cell transfer of bacterial outer membrane lipoproteins
    Eric Nudleman
    Departments of Developmental Biology and Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, B300 Beckman Center, 279 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Science 309:125-7. 2005
    ..The high transfer efficiency of Tgl and CglB proteins suggests that donor and recipient cells briefly fuse their outer membranes...
  11. doi request reprint Myxococcus-from single-cell polarity to complex multicellular patterns
    Dale Kaiser
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Genet 42:109-30. 2008
    ..Mgl.GTP then recognizes the engines that are currently in use and inactivates both of them. Meanwhile, new engines appear as instructed by the template, and the cell starts to glide in the opposite direction...
  12. pmc Regulating pilin expression reveals a threshold for S motility in Myxococcus xanthus
    Lotte Jelsbak
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5329, USA
    J Bacteriol 187:2105-12. 2005
    ..This observation implies that a threshold concentration of pilin must be exceeded before the shear-sensitive material (pili) is polymerized in M. xanthus...
  13. pmc Mutations of the act promoter in Myxococcus xanthus
    Thomas M A Gronewold
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5329, USA
    J Bacteriol 189:1836-44. 2007
    ..We propose that, as cells engage in more C signaling, positive feedback raises the number of C-signal molecules per cell and drives the process of fruiting body development forward...
  14. ncbi request reprint Pulling together with type IV pili
    Eric Nudleman
    Stanford University, Departments of Biochemistry and of Developmental Biology, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Mol Microbiol Biotechnol 7:52-62. 2004
    ....
  15. ncbi request reprint Coupling cell movement to multicellular development in myxobacteria
    Dale Kaiser
    Stanford University, Departments of Biochemistry and Developmental Biology, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Rev Microbiol 1:45-54. 2003
    ..The myxobacteria communicate with each other and coordinate their movements through a cell-contact-dependent signal. Here, the cell movements that culminate in the development of the multicellular fruiting body are reviewed...
  16. ncbi request reprint Gliding motility and polarized slime secretion
    Rosa Yu
    Departments of Biochemistry and of Developmental Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Microbiol 63:454-67. 2007
    ..Many of the pgl mutants are produced by transposon insertions in glycosyltransferase genes. It is proposed that these glycosyltransferases carry out the synthesis of a repeat unit polysaccharide that constitutes the slime...
  17. pmc Myxococcus xanthus swarms are driven by growth and regulated by a pacemaker
    Dale Kaiser
    Departments of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Bacteriol 193:5898-904. 2011
    ..The periodic reversal of interacting rod-shaped cells promotes their alignment. Swarm organization ensures that each cell can move without blocking the movement of others...
  18. ncbi request reprint Reversing cell polarity: evidence and hypothesis
    Dale Kaiser
    B300 Beckman Center, Department of Developmental Biology, 279 Campus Drive, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Curr Opin Microbiol 8:216-21. 2005
    ..Cells reverse regularly every eight minutes in traveling waves, the reversal period is then prolonged enabling cells to form streams that enlarge tiny random aggregates into fruiting bodies...
  19. pmc act operon control of developmental gene expression in Myxococcus xanthus
    Thomas M A Gronewold
    Departments of Biochemistry and of Developmental Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5329, USA
    J Bacteriol 184:1172-9. 2002
    ..The pattern of effects on these reporters shows how the C-signal differentially regulates the steps that together build a fruiting body and differentiate spores within it...
  20. pmc Sigma54 enhancer binding proteins and Myxococcus xanthus fruiting body development
    Jimmy S Jakobsen
    Departments of Biochemistry and Developmental Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Bacteriol 186:4361-8. 2004
    ..Three were previously unknown genes, and they were inactivated to look for effects on fruiting body development. One knockout mutant produced fruiting bodies of abnormal shape that depended on the composition of the medium...
  21. pmc A biochemical oscillator explains several aspects of Myxococcus xanthus behavior during development
    Oleg A Igoshin
    Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:15760-5. 2004
    ..We also propose experiments to test the model...
  22. pmc A three-dimensional model of myxobacterial aggregation by contact-mediated interactions
    Olga Sozinova
    Department of Mathematics and Center for the Study of Biocomplexity, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 5670, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:11308-12. 2005
    ..We show that, at high cell density, cells stream around the traffic jam, generating a 3D hemispherical mound. Later, when the nuclear traffic jam dissolves, the aggregation center becomes a 3D ring of streaming cells...
  23. pmc 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthase is involved in biosynthesis of isovaleryl-CoA in the myxobacterium Myxococcus xanthus during fruiting body formation
    Helge B Bode
    Institut für Pharmazeutische Biotechnologie, Universitat des Saarlandes, P O Box 151150, 66041 Saarbrucken, Germany
    J Bacteriol 188:6524-8. 2006
    ....
  24. pmc Straight-chain fatty acids are dispensable in the myxobacterium Myxococcus xanthus for vegetative growth and fruiting body formation
    Helge B Bode
    Institut für Pharmazeutische Biotechnologie, Universitat des Saarlandes, P O Box 151150, 66041 Saarbrucken, Germany
    J Bacteriol 188:5632-4. 2006
    ..Despite this drastic change in the fatty acid profile, no change in phenotype could be observed, which contrasts with previous interpretations of the role of straight-chain fatty acids in the organism's development...
  25. ncbi request reprint Breaking symmetry in myxobacteria
    Oleg A Igoshin
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 3112, USA
    Curr Biol 14:R459-62. 2004
  26. pmc Waves and aggregation patterns in myxobacteria
    Oleg A Igoshin
    Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:4256-61. 2004
    ..Still later, pairs of motile aggregates coalesce to form larger aggregates that develop into fruiting bodies. Here we present a mathematical model that quantitatively explains these wave and aggregation phenomena...
  27. ncbi request reprint How myxobacteria glide
    Charles Wolgemuth
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology and ESPM, University of California, Berkeley 94720 3112, USA
    Curr Biol 12:369-77. 2002
    ..Recently, nozzle-like structures were discovered in cyanobacteria from which slime emanated at the same rate at which the bacteria moved. This strongly implicates slime extrusion as a propulsion mechanism for gliding...
  28. pmc A three-dimensional model of myxobacterial fruiting-body formation
    Olga Sozinova
    Department of Mathematics and Center for the Study of Biocomplexity, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 5670, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:17255-9. 2006
    ....