D Kaiser

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Cell fate and organogenesis in bacteria
    D Kaiser
    Departments of Biochemistry and Developmental Biology, Beckman Center, B300, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5329, USA
    Trends Genet 15:273-7. 1999
  2. ncbi request reprint Building a multicellular organism
    D Kaiser
    Department of Biochemistry and of Developmental Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Genet 35:103-23. 2001
  3. ncbi request reprint How and why myxobacteria talk to each other
    D Kaiser
    Department of Biochemistry, Beckman Center, B300, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5329, USA
    Curr Opin Microbiol 1:663-8. 1998
  4. pmc The Myxococcus xanthus pilQ (sglA) gene encodes a secretin homolog required for type IV pilus biogenesis, social motility, and development
    D Wall
    Departments of Biochemistry and Developmental Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305
    J Bacteriol 181:24-33. 1999
  5. ncbi request reprint The pilH gene encodes an ABC transporter homologue required for type IV pilus biogenesis and social gliding motility in Myxococcus xanthus
    S S Wu
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Microbiol 29:1249-61. 1998
  6. pmc A sigma(54) activator protein necessary for spore differentiation within the fruiting body of Myxococcus xanthus
    L Gorski
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Bacteriol 182:2438-44. 2000
  7. pmc Function of MglA, a 22-kilodalton protein essential for gliding in Myxococcus xanthus
    P Hartzell
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5307
    J Bacteriol 173:7615-24. 1991
  8. ncbi request reprint The Myxococcus xanthus pilT locus is required for social gliding motility although pili are still produced
    S S Wu
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305, USA
    Mol Microbiol 23:109-21. 1997
  9. pmc devRS, an autoregulated and essential genetic locus for fruiting body development in Myxococcus xanthus
    L Thony-Meyer
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5427
    J Bacteriol 175:7450-62. 1993
  10. pmc sigma54, a vital protein for Myxococcus xanthus
    I M Keseler
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5307, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 94:1979-84. 1997

Collaborators

  • S K Kim
  • Y Cheng
  • J Wu
  • L Thony-Meyer
  • S Karlin
  • D Wall
  • A M Spormann
  • Mervyn Singer
  • H S Kim
  • S S Wu
  • B S Goldman
  • T M Gronewold
  • R Welch
  • O A Igoshin
  • L Gorski
  • J A Eisen
  • A S Durkin
  • C M Ronning
  • N Miller
  • C MacKenzie
  • H B Kaplan
  • S A Sullivan
  • O Iartchuk
  • M Vaudin
  • B Z Harris
  • S C Slater
  • M Blanchard
  • C Halling
  • G Hinkle
  • R Wiegand
  • W B Barbazuk
  • R Madupu
  • C Field
  • A Shvartsbeyn
  • W C Nierman
  • J Eisen
  • I M Keseler
  • J P Rodriguez-Soto
  • G Oster
  • R D Welch
  • A Mogilner
  • T Gronewold
  • L V Kalman
  • H H Kimsey
  • P Hartzell
  • K Stephens

Detail Information

Publications28

  1. ncbi request reprint Cell fate and organogenesis in bacteria
    D Kaiser
    Departments of Biochemistry and Developmental Biology, Beckman Center, B300, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5329, USA
    Trends Genet 15:273-7. 1999
    ..Consideration of these parallels enables us to make testable experimental predictions about Notch and C-signaling...
  2. ncbi request reprint Building a multicellular organism
    D Kaiser
    Department of Biochemistry and of Developmental Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Genet 35:103-23. 2001
    ..The independent instances of multicellularity reviewed indicate that advantages in feeding and in dispersion are common. The capacity for signaling between cells accompanies the evolution of multicellularity with cell differentiation...
  3. ncbi request reprint How and why myxobacteria talk to each other
    D Kaiser
    Department of Biochemistry, Beckman Center, B300, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5329, USA
    Curr Opin Microbiol 1:663-8. 1998
    ..Following identification of several signal molecules, important transcriptional regulators and other signals have recently been identified. Steps on signal transduction pathways have also been defined...
  4. pmc The Myxococcus xanthus pilQ (sglA) gene encodes a secretin homolog required for type IV pilus biogenesis, social motility, and development
    D Wall
    Departments of Biochemistry and Developmental Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305
    J Bacteriol 181:24-33. 1999
    ..Many differences between pilQ1 and pilQ+ strains have been noted in the literature. We discuss some of these observations and how they may be rationalized in the context of our molecular and functional findings...
  5. ncbi request reprint The pilH gene encodes an ABC transporter homologue required for type IV pilus biogenesis and social gliding motility in Myxococcus xanthus
    S S Wu
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Microbiol 29:1249-61. 1998
    ..The complex may participate in pilus assembly and/or the export of PilA pilin...
  6. pmc A sigma(54) activator protein necessary for spore differentiation within the fruiting body of Myxococcus xanthus
    L Gorski
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Bacteriol 182:2438-44. 2000
    ..The act1 mutant, unable to raise the level of csgA expression, carries out only those developmental steps for which a low level of C-signaling is adequate...
  7. pmc Function of MglA, a 22-kilodalton protein essential for gliding in Myxococcus xanthus
    P Hartzell
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5307
    J Bacteriol 173:7615-24. 1991
    ..On the basis of its genetic properties, intracellular location, and amino acid sequence, it is argued that MglA protein is a regulator in the sequence of functions leading to cell movement...
  8. ncbi request reprint The Myxococcus xanthus pilT locus is required for social gliding motility although pili are still produced
    S S Wu
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305, USA
    Mol Microbiol 23:109-21. 1997
    ..Thus, pilB, pilT, pilC, pilS, pilR and pilA form a contiguous cluster of pil genes required for social motility...
  9. pmc devRS, an autoregulated and essential genetic locus for fruiting body development in Myxococcus xanthus
    L Thony-Meyer
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5427
    J Bacteriol 175:7450-62. 1993
    ..Multiple levels of regulation suggest that devRS is a switch required to activate completion of aggregation and sporulation...
  10. pmc sigma54, a vital protein for Myxococcus xanthus
    I M Keseler
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5307, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 94:1979-84. 1997
    ..The product of the rpoN gene, sigma54, therefore appears to be essential for growth in M. xanthus...
  11. pmc The tgl gene: social motility and stimulation in Myxococcus xanthus
    J P Rodriguez-Soto
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5427, USA
    J Bacteriol 179:4361-71. 1997
    ..ORFB is the tgl gene, because a 613-bp DNA fragment which includes 75% of ORFB rescues tgl-1, -2, and -3 mutants and because disruption of ORFB by deletion or insertion of transposon Tn5lac constitutes a tgl mutation...
  12. pmc The Myxococcus xanthus dsg gene product performs functions of translation initiation factor IF3 in vivo
    L V Kalman
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University, School of Medicine, California 94305
    J Bacteriol 176:1434-42. 1994
    ..Partial and complete deletion of this tail showed that it is needed for certain vegetative and developmental functions but not for viability...
  13. pmc dsg, a gene required for Myxococcus development, is necessary for cell viability
    Y Cheng
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University, California 94305
    J Bacteriol 171:3727-31. 1989
    ..Thus the evidence implies that the dsg gene is essential for viability as well as development, but its essential quality differs between growth and development because dsg-429 and dsg-439 mutants grow normally, but are unable to develop...
  14. ncbi request reprint Genetic and functional evidence that Type IV pili are required for social gliding motility in Myxococcus xanthus
    S S Wu
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Microbiol 18:547-58. 1995
    ..These results indicate that the pili of M. xanthus belong to the Type IV family of pili, and demonstrate that these pili are actually required for social motility...
  15. ncbi request reprint The act operon controls the level and time of C-signal production for Myxococcus xanthus development
    T M Gronewold
    Departments of Biochemistry and Developmental Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 297 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Microbiol 40:744-56. 2001
    ..The loop explains how the C-signal rises continuously from early development to a peak at the time of sporulation, and the act genes govern the time course of that rise...
  16. ncbi request reprint Ectopic production of guanosine penta- and tetraphosphate can initiate early developmental gene expression in Myxococcus xanthus
    M Singer
    Department of Biochemistry, Beckman Center for Molecular and Genetic Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5427, USA
    Genes Dev 9:1633-44. 1995
    ..These results suggest that M. xanthus cells can assess their nutritional status by monitoring the internal availability of amino acids through (p)ppGpp levels...
  17. pmc Characterizations of highly expressed genes of four fast-growing bacteria
    S Karlin
    Department of Mathematics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 2125, USA
    J Bacteriol 183:5025-40. 2001
    ..Relationships of PHX genes with stoichiometry, multifunctionality, and operon structures are also examined. The spatial distribution of PHX genes within each genome reveals clusters and significantly long regions without PHX genes...
  18. pmc dsg, a gene required for cell-cell interaction early in Myxococcus development
    Y Cheng
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University, California 94305
    J Bacteriol 171:3719-26. 1989
    ..Subcloning of restriction fragments, deletions, and insertions of transposon Tn5 agree in locating the dsg gene to an 850-base-pair segment of the cloned region...
  19. pmc Gliding mutants of Myxococcus xanthus with high reversal frequencies and small displacements
    A M Spormann
    Max Planck Institut fur terrestrische Mikrobiologie, 35043 Marburg, Germany
    J Bacteriol 181:2593-601. 1999
    ..Furthermore, mglAB mutants behave as if they were severely defective in A motility but only partially defective in S motility...
  20. ncbi request reprint The orotidine-5'-monophosphate decarboxylase gene of Myxococcus xanthus. Comparison to the OMP decarboxylase gene family
    H H Kimsey
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University Medical Center, California 94305
    J Biol Chem 267:819-24. 1992
    ..Expression of the uraA gene may be regulated by an intercistronic transcription termination mechanism...
  21. pmc Gliding motility in Myxococcus xanthus: mgl locus, RNA, and predicted protein products
    K Stephens
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University, California 94305
    J Bacteriol 171:819-30. 1989
    ..The function of the upstream open reading frame is not known with certainty, although it does contain one of the mgl mutant sites and could be a second mgl gene...
  22. ncbi request reprint C-factor: a cell-cell signaling protein required for fruiting body morphogenesis of M. xanthus
    S K Kim
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305
    Cell 61:19-26. 1990
    ..The amino acid sequence from purified C-factor demonstrates that it is the product of the csgA gene. C-factor is active over a narrow range of concentration and has properties of a morphogenetic paracrine signal...
  23. ncbi request reprint Control of cell density and pattern by intercellular signaling in Myxococcus development
    S K Kim
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305
    Annu Rev Microbiol 46:117-39. 1992
    ..In turn, proper signaling insures that the appropriate cell density exists, thus controlling the progress of multicellular development in M. xanthus...
  24. pmc The dsg gene of Myxococcus xanthus encodes a protein similar to translation initiation factor IF3
    Y L Cheng
    Department of Biochemistry and Developmental Biology, Stanford University, California 94305
    J Bacteriol 176:1427-33. 1994
    ..xanthus dsg gene in E. coli cells initiates at an AUC codon, an atypical initiation codon in the AUU class. The dsg mutants DK429 and DK439 carry the same missense mutation that changes Gly-134 to Glu in a region of amino acid identity...
  25. pmc The guanosine nucleotide (p)ppGpp initiates development and A-factor production in myxococcus xanthus
    B Z Harris
    Section of Microbiology, Division of Biological Sciences, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 USA
    Genes Dev 12:1022-35. 1998
    ..These observations support a model in which accumulation of (p)ppGpp, in response to starvation, initiates the program of fruiting body development, including the production of A-factor...
  26. pmc Cell behavior in traveling wave patterns of myxobacteria
    R Welch
    Department of Developmental Biology, B300 Beckman Center, 279 Campus Drive, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305. USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98:14907-12. 2001
    ..This model of traveling waves represents a new mode of biological pattern formation that depends on cell-contact interactions rather than reaction diffusion...
  27. pmc Pattern formation and traveling waves in myxobacteria: theory and modeling
    O A Igoshin
    Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98:14913-8. 2001
    ..This pattern of waves is qualitatively different from that observed in other social organisms, especially Dictyostelium discoideum, which depend on diffusible morphogens...
  28. pmc Evolution of sensory complexity recorded in a myxobacterial genome
    B S Goldman
    Monsanto Company, St Louis, MO 63167, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:15200-5. 2006
    ..Families of genes encoding the production of secondary metabolites are overrepresented in the genome but may have been received by horizontal gene transfer and are likely to be important for predation...