John R Hutchinson

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Tyrannosaurus was not a fast runner
    John R Hutchinson
    Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 3140, USA
    Nature 415:1018-21. 2002
  2. ncbi request reprint The evolution of hindlimb tendons and muscles on the line to crown-group birds
    John R Hutchinson
    Biomechanical Engineering Division, Stanford University, Durand 209, BME, Stanford, CA 94305 4038, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 133:1051-86. 2002
  3. ncbi request reprint Biomechanics: Are fast-moving elephants really running?
    John R Hutchinson
    Biomechanical Engineering Division, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 4038, USA
    Nature 422:493-4. 2003
  4. ncbi request reprint Biomechanical modeling and sensitivity analysis of bipedal running ability. II. Extinct taxa
    John R Hutchinson
    Biomechanical Engineering Division, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 4038, USA
    J Morphol 262:441-61. 2004
  5. ncbi request reprint Biomechanical modeling and sensitivity analysis of bipedal running ability. I. Extant taxa
    John R Hutchinson
    Biomechanical Engineering Division, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 4038, USA
    J Morphol 262:421-40. 2004
  6. ncbi request reprint A 3D interactive method for estimating body segmental parameters in animals: application to the turning and running performance of Tyrannosaurus rex
    John R Hutchinson
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5450, USA
    J Theor Biol 246:660-80. 2007
  7. ncbi request reprint Biomechanics: early birds surmount steep slopes
    John R Hutchinson
    Nature 426:777-8. 2003
  8. ncbi request reprint Pelvic and hindlimb musculature of Tyrannosaurus rex (Dinosauria: Theropoda)
    Matthew T Carrano
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 8081, USA
    J Morphol 253:207-28. 2002
  9. ncbi request reprint The locomotor kinematics of Asian and African elephants: changes with speed and size
    John R Hutchinson
    Structure and Motion Laboratory, Department of Veterinary Basic Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, AL9 7TA, UK
    J Exp Biol 209:3812-27. 2006
  10. pmc The three-dimensional locomotor dynamics of African (Loxodonta africana) and Asian (Elephas maximus) elephants reveal a smooth gait transition at moderate speed
    Lei Ren
    Structure and Motion Laboratory, The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA, UK
    J R Soc Interface 5:195-211. 2008

Detail Information

Publications13

  1. ncbi request reprint Tyrannosaurus was not a fast runner
    John R Hutchinson
    Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 3140, USA
    Nature 415:1018-21. 2002
    ..Therefore, it is doubtful that Tyrannosaurus and other huge dinosaurs (approximately 6,000 kg) were capable runners or could reach high speeds...
  2. ncbi request reprint The evolution of hindlimb tendons and muscles on the line to crown-group birds
    John R Hutchinson
    Biomechanical Engineering Division, Stanford University, Durand 209, BME, Stanford, CA 94305 4038, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 133:1051-86. 2002
    ..Locomotion evolved in a stepwise pattern that only recently produced the derived limb control mechanisms of crown-group birds, such as the strongly flexed hip and knee joints...
  3. ncbi request reprint Biomechanics: Are fast-moving elephants really running?
    John R Hutchinson
    Biomechanical Engineering Division, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 4038, USA
    Nature 422:493-4. 2003
  4. ncbi request reprint Biomechanical modeling and sensitivity analysis of bipedal running ability. II. Extinct taxa
    John R Hutchinson
    Biomechanical Engineering Division, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 4038, USA
    J Morphol 262:441-61. 2004
    ..I discuss what speeds were possible for different theropod dinosaurs, and how running ability evolved in an inverse relationship to body size in archosaurs...
  5. ncbi request reprint Biomechanical modeling and sensitivity analysis of bipedal running ability. I. Extant taxa
    John R Hutchinson
    Biomechanical Engineering Division, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 4038, USA
    J Morphol 262:421-40. 2004
    ..caudofemoralis longus...
  6. ncbi request reprint A 3D interactive method for estimating body segmental parameters in animals: application to the turning and running performance of Tyrannosaurus rex
    John R Hutchinson
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5450, USA
    J Theor Biol 246:660-80. 2007
    ..rex could turn. Depending on the assumptions, our whole body model integrated with a musculoskeletal model estimates that turning 45 degrees on one leg could be achieved slowly, in about 1-2s...
  7. ncbi request reprint Biomechanics: early birds surmount steep slopes
    John R Hutchinson
    Nature 426:777-8. 2003
  8. ncbi request reprint Pelvic and hindlimb musculature of Tyrannosaurus rex (Dinosauria: Theropoda)
    Matthew T Carrano
    Department of Anatomical Sciences, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 8081, USA
    J Morphol 253:207-28. 2002
    ..rex--the largest known terrestrial biped--this reconstruction also helps to clarify the sequence of character-state change along the line to extant birds...
  9. ncbi request reprint The locomotor kinematics of Asian and African elephants: changes with speed and size
    John R Hutchinson
    Structure and Motion Laboratory, Department of Veterinary Basic Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, AL9 7TA, UK
    J Exp Biol 209:3812-27. 2006
    ....
  10. pmc The three-dimensional locomotor dynamics of African (Loxodonta africana) and Asian (Elephas maximus) elephants reveal a smooth gait transition at moderate speed
    Lei Ren
    Structure and Motion Laboratory, The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA, UK
    J R Soc Interface 5:195-211. 2008
    ..Hence, they are not as rigid limbed as typically characterized for graviportal animals, and use regular walking as well as at least one form of running gait...
  11. doi request reprint The movements of limb segments and joints during locomotion in African and Asian elephants
    Lei Ren
    Structure and Motion Laboratory, Department of Veterinary Basic Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA, UK
    J Exp Biol 211:2735-51. 2008
    ..Our database will be helpful for identifying elephants with unusual limb movements, facilitating early recognition of musculoskeletal pathology...
  12. ncbi request reprint Dinosaur locomotion: beyond the bones
    John R Hutchinson
    Nature 440:292-4. 2006
  13. doi request reprint Some basic relationships between density values in cancellous and cortical bone
    Peter Zioupos
    Department of Materials and Applied Science, Cranfield University, Shrivenham, UK
    J Biomech 41:1961-8. 2008
    ..Our findings may have implications not only for the segregation of bone in these two structural forms, but also for the mechanobiological and physiological processes that govern the regulation of compact and trabecular bone areas...