Fumiko Hoeft

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Neural basis of dyslexia: a comparison between dyslexic and nondyslexic children equated for reading ability
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California 94305 2130, USA
    J Neurosci 26:10700-8. 2006
  2. pmc Morphometric spatial patterns differentiating boys with fragile X syndrome, typically developing boys, and developmentally delayed boys aged 1 to 3 years
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Rd, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    Arch Gen Psychiatry 65:1087-97. 2008
  3. pmc Functional and morphometric brain dissociation between dyslexia and reading ability
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94305 2130, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:4234-9. 2007
  4. pmc Electronically switchable sham transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) system
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e1923. 2008
  5. ncbi request reprint Fronto-striatal dysfunction and potential compensatory mechanisms in male adolescents with fragile X syndrome
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research CIBSR, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Hum Brain Mapp 28:543-54. 2007
  6. ncbi request reprint Prediction of children's reading skills using behavioral, functional, and structural neuroimaging measures
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    Behav Neurosci 121:602-13. 2007
  7. pmc Neural systems predicting long-term outcome in dyslexia
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94129, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:361-6. 2011
  8. ncbi request reprint More is not always better: increased fractional anisotropy of superior longitudinal fasciculus associated with poor visuospatial abilities in Williams syndrome
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California 94305 5795, USA
    J Neurosci 27:11960-5. 2007
  9. doi request reprint Neuroanatomical differences in toddler boys with fragile x syndrome and idiopathic autism
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5795, USA
    Arch Gen Psychiatry 68:295-305. 2011
  10. pmc Genetic influences on sociability: heightened amygdala reactivity and event-related responses to positive social stimuli in Williams syndrome
    Brian W Haas
    Center of Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California 94305 5795, USA
    J Neurosci 29:1132-9. 2009

Detail Information

Publications38

  1. ncbi request reprint Neural basis of dyslexia: a comparison between dyslexic and nondyslexic children equated for reading ability
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California 94305 2130, USA
    J Neurosci 26:10700-8. 2006
    ....
  2. pmc Morphometric spatial patterns differentiating boys with fragile X syndrome, typically developing boys, and developmentally delayed boys aged 1 to 3 years
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Rd, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    Arch Gen Psychiatry 65:1087-97. 2008
    ....
  3. pmc Functional and morphometric brain dissociation between dyslexia and reading ability
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94305 2130, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:4234-9. 2007
    ..In contrast, areas of hypoactivation in dyslexia reflected functional atypicalities related to dyslexia itself, independent of current reading ability, and related to atypical brain morphology in dyslexia...
  4. pmc Electronically switchable sham transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) system
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e1923. 2008
    ..Our results raise the possibility of utilizing this technique for a wide range of applications...
  5. ncbi request reprint Fronto-striatal dysfunction and potential compensatory mechanisms in male adolescents with fragile X syndrome
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research CIBSR, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Hum Brain Mapp 28:543-54. 2007
    ..We further show that these putative compensatory processes can be predicted by a complex interaction between genetic risk and neural function...
  6. ncbi request reprint Prediction of children's reading skills using behavioral, functional, and structural neuroimaging measures
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    Behav Neurosci 121:602-13. 2007
    ..Results were validated using cross-validation methods. These findings suggest that neuroimaging methods may be useful in enhancing the early identification of children at risk for poor decoding and reading skills...
  7. pmc Neural systems predicting long-term outcome in dyslexia
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94129, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:361-6. 2011
    ..Brain measures that predict future behavioral outcomes (neuroprognosis) may be more accurate, in some cases, than available behavioral measures...
  8. ncbi request reprint More is not always better: increased fractional anisotropy of superior longitudinal fasciculus associated with poor visuospatial abilities in Williams syndrome
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California 94305 5795, USA
    J Neurosci 27:11960-5. 2007
    ..Together, these findings suggest a specific role of right SLF abnormality in visuospatial construction deficits in WS...
  9. doi request reprint Neuroanatomical differences in toddler boys with fragile x syndrome and idiopathic autism
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5795, USA
    Arch Gen Psychiatry 68:295-305. 2011
    ..Many conditions of atypical development can lead to autism, including fragile X syndrome (FXS), which is presently the most common known single-gene cause of autism...
  10. pmc Genetic influences on sociability: heightened amygdala reactivity and event-related responses to positive social stimuli in Williams syndrome
    Brian W Haas
    Center of Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California 94305 5795, USA
    J Neurosci 29:1132-9. 2009
    ..This study provides the first evidence that the genetic deletion associated with WS influences the function of the amygdala to be particularly responsive to socially appetitive stimuli...
  11. pmc Early white-matter abnormalities of the ventral frontostriatal pathway in fragile X syndrome
    Brian W Haas
    Center of Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Dev Med Child Neurol 51:593-9. 2009
    ..Fragile X syndrome is associated with cognitive deficits in inhibitory control and with abnormal neuronal morphology and development...
  12. doi request reprint Aberrant brain activation during gaze processing in boys with fragile X syndrome
    Christa Watson
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Rd, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    Arch Gen Psychiatry 65:1315-23. 2008
    ..To date (to our knowledge), this behavior in fraX has been studied only in female subjects, who show lesser degrees of gaze aversion...
  13. doi request reprint Sex chromosomes and the brain: a study of neuroanatomy in XYY syndrome
    Daniel M Bryant
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Dev Med Child Neurol 54:1149-56. 2012
    ..To assess global and regional brain matter variations associated with XYY syndrome by comparison with Klinefelter syndrome and typical development...
  14. pmc Maternal history of reading difficulty is associated with reduced language-related gray matter in beginning readers
    Jessica M Black
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research CIBSR, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral, Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Rd, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    Neuroimage 59:3021-32. 2012
    ..These results help to guide future neuroimaging research focusing on environmental and genetic influences and provide new information that may help predict which child will develop dyslexia in the future...
  15. pmc Influence of the X-chromosome on neuroanatomy: evidence from Turner and Klinefelter syndromes
    David S Hong
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford, California 94305, Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143, Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107, and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305
    J Neurosci 34:3509-16. 2014
    ..We infer that sex chromosome gene expression directly influences brain structure in children during early stages of puberty, extending our understanding of genotype-phenotype mechanisms underlying sex differences in the brain. ..
  16. doi request reprint Functional brain basis of hypnotizability
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Arch Gen Psychiatry 69:1064-72. 2012
    ..Pain and anxiety can be effectively alleviated by hypnotic suggestion, which modulates activity in brain regions associated with focused attention, but the specific neural network underlying this phenomenon is not known...
  17. doi request reprint The brain basis of the phonological deficit in dyslexia is independent of IQ
    Hiroko Tanaka
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University School of Medicine, USA
    Psychol Sci 22:1442-51. 2011
    ..These results converge with behavioral evidence indicating that, regardless of IQ, poor readers have similar kinds of reading difficulties in relation to phonological processing...
  18. ncbi request reprint Aberrant functional network recruitment of posterior parietal cortex in Turner syndrome
    Signe Bray
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, USA Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, USA Department of Psychiatry, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
    Hum Brain Mapp 34:3117-28. 2013
    ..These results suggest that abnormal development of visuospatial functional networks in TS may relate to the well documented cognitive difficulties in this disorder...
  19. doi request reprint Individual differences in social behavior predict amygdala response to fearful facial expressions in Williams syndrome
    Brian W Haas
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research CIBSR, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, Palo Alto, CA 94305 5795, USA
    Neuropsychologia 48:1283-8. 2010
    ..These findings contribute to our understanding of social and emotional functioning in neurodevelopmental conditions and provide evidence that in WS, amygdala response to fear modulates social behavior...
  20. pmc Brain activation during sentence comprehension among good and poor readers
    Ann Meyler
    Center for Cognitive Brain Imaging, Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
    Cereb Cortex 17:2780-7. 2007
    ..It is proposed that the functioning of the cortical network underlying reading is dependent on a combination of interacting factors, including physiological maturation, neural integrity, skill level, and the nature of the task...
  21. pmc Strategy-dependent dissociation of the neural correlates involved in pain modulation
    Jane M Lawrence
    Department of Anesthesia, Division of Pain Management, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, USA
    Anesthesiology 115:844-51. 2011
    ..Understanding the neural correlates that underlie these strategies will enhance understanding of the analgesic network of the brain and the cognitive modulation of pain...
  22. pmc Topological properties of large-scale structural brain networks in children with familial risk for reading difficulties
    S M Hadi Hosseini
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Rd, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    Neuroimage 71:260-74. 2013
    ....
  23. doi request reprint Fasting plasma insulin and the default mode network in women at risk for Alzheimer's disease
    Heather Kenna
    Stanford Center for Neurosciences in Women s Health, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 95305 5723, USA
    Neurobiol Aging 34:641-9. 2013
    ..The results provide further evidence of deleterious effects of IR on the hippocampus and cognition. Further imaging studies of the IR-related perturbations in DMN-hippocampal functional connectivity are needed...
  24. pmc Default mode network connectivity distinguishes chemotherapy-treated breast cancer survivors from controls
    Shelli R Kesler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:11600-5. 2013
    ..002) with greater hyperplane distance (distance from the linear decision function that optimally separates the groups). Disrupted DMN connectivity may help explain long-term cognitive difficulties following BC chemotherapy. ..
  25. doi request reprint Failure of anterior cingulate activation and connectivity with the amygdala during implicit regulation of emotional processing in generalized anxiety disorder
    Amit Etkin
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, the Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research, and the Program in Neuroscience, Stanford University, USA
    Am J Psychiatry 167:545-54. 2010
    ..Here the authors examined whether this form of noninstructed emotion regulation is perturbed in generalized anxiety disorder...
  26. pmc Neuroanatomical phenotype of Klinefelter syndrome in childhood: a voxel-based morphometry study
    Daniel M Bryant
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5795, USA
    J Neurosci 31:6654-60. 2011
    ..This work offers new insight into the relationships among X-chromosome gene expression, neuroanatomy, and cognitive-behavioral functions impaired in KS, including language and attention...
  27. pmc Region-specific alterations in brain development in one- to three-year-old boys with fragile X syndrome
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:9335-9. 2010
    ..The creation of an early and accurate human brain phenotype for FXS in humans will significantly improve our capability to detect whether new disease-specific treatments can "rescue" the FXS phenotype in affected individuals...
  28. doi request reprint Gender differences in the mesocorticolimbic system during computer game-play
    Fumiko Hoeft
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    J Psychiatr Res 42:253-8. 2008
    ..These gender differences may help explain why males are more attracted to, and more likely to become "hooked" on video games than females...
  29. pmc The neural basis of auditory temporal discrimination in girls with fragile X syndrome
    Scott S Hall
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Stanford University, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305 5795, USA
    J Neurodev Disord 1:91-9. 2009
    ..In particular, it is possible that girls with FXS employ left hemispheric resources to overcompensate for relative right hemispheric dysfunction...
  30. pmc Neurobiological underpinnings of math and reading learning disabilities
    Sarit Ashkenazi
    1Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Learn Disabil 46:549-69. 2013
    ....
  31. pmc GAT: a graph-theoretical analysis toolbox for analyzing between-group differences in large-scale structural and functional brain networks
    S M Hadi Hosseini
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e40709. 2012
    ..Along with demonstration of the capabilities of the GAT, this is the first report of altered large-scale structural brain networks in ALL survivors...
  32. pmc Revealing the neural networks associated with processing of natural social interaction and the related effects of actor-orientation and face-visibility
    Manish Saggar
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, USA Electronic address
    Neuroimage 84:648-56. 2014
    ....
  33. pmc Anomalous hypothalamic responses to humor in cataplexy
    Allan L Reiss
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e2225. 2008
    ..The objective of this study was to examine the neural systems underlying humor processing in individuals with cataplexy...
  34. pmc Noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation and pain
    Allyson C Rosen
    Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System, 3801 Miranda Avenue 151Y, Palo Alto, CA 94304 1207, USA
    Curr Pain Headache Rep 13:12-7. 2009
    ..This review presents a description and overview of the uses of two major brain stimulation techniques and a listing of useful references for further study...
  35. pmc Neuroanatomical spatial patterns in Turner syndrome
    Matthew J Marzelli
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroimage 55:439-47. 2011
    ..Our results demonstrate robust spatial patterns of altered brain morphology in developmentally dynamic populations with TS, providing further insight into the neuroanatomical correlates of cognitive-behavioral features in this condition...
  36. ncbi request reprint Abnormal cortical activation during response inhibition in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome
    Doron Gothelf
    The Behavioral Neurogenetics Center, Child Psychiatry Department, Schneider Children s Medical Center of Israel, Petah Tiqwa, Israel
    Hum Brain Mapp 28:533-42. 2007
    ..2DS may recruit additional cingulate activation for tasks requiring attention and inhibition. 22q11.2DS is a unique model for learning about the deleterious effects of decreased dosage of the COMT gene on brain function...
  37. ncbi request reprint [Contribution of neuroimaging in the prediction of outcome in neuropsychiatric disorders and learning disabilities]
    Nobuhisa Kobayashi
    Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research CIBSR, Stanford University School of Medicine
    Brain Nerve 59:1203-10. 2007
    ..This evidence raises the intriguing possibility of utilizing neuroimaging data as a critical component in assessing and predicting cognitive abilities and..
  38. pmc Neuroanatomy of fragile X syndrome is associated with aberrant behavior and the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP)
    Doron Gothelf
    Behavioral Neurogenetics Center, Child Psychiatry Department, Schneider Children s Medical Center of Israel, Petah Tiqwa
    Ann Neurol 63:40-51. 2008
    ..To determine how neuroanatomic variation in children and adolescents with fragile X syndrome is linked to reduced levels of the fragile X mental retardation-1 protein and to aberrant cognition and behavior...