Jill Helms

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc The buccohypophyseal canal is an ancestral vertebrate trait maintained by modulation in sonic hedgehog signaling
    Roman H Khonsari
    Department of Craniofacial Development and Stem Cell Research, Comprehensive Biomedical Research Center, Dental Institute, King s College London, London, UK
    BMC Biol 11:27. 2013
  2. ncbi request reprint Bone voyage: an expedition into the molecular and cellular parameters affecting bone graft fate
    J A Helms
    Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford Medical School, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Bone 41:479-85. 2007
  3. ncbi request reprint New insights into craniofacial morphogenesis
    Jill A Helms
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Development 132:851-61. 2005
  4. doi request reprint Embryonic origin and Hox status determine progenitor cell fate during adult bone regeneration
    Philipp Leucht
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Development 135:2845-54. 2008
  5. ncbi request reprint Head, shoulders, knees, and toes
    Luis de la Fuente
    The Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Dev Biol 282:294-306. 2005
  6. ncbi request reprint Molecular interactions coordinating the development of the forebrain and face
    Ralph S Marcucio
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Dev Biol 284:48-61. 2005
  7. pmc A primary cilia-dependent etiology for midline facial disorders
    Samantha A Brugmann
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Hum Mol Genet 19:1577-92. 2010
  8. pmc Endochondral ossification is required for haematopoietic stem-cell niche formation
    Charles K F Chan
    Department of Pathology, Developmental Biology and Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University, California, USA
    Nature 457:490-4. 2009
  9. ncbi request reprint The molecular origins of species-specific facial pattern
    Samantha A Brugmann
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University, California 94305, USA
    Curr Top Dev Biol 73:1-42. 2006
  10. pmc Wnt and FGF signals interact to coordinate growth with cell fate specification during limb development
    Derk ten Berge
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Developmental Biology, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Development 135:3247-57. 2008

Research Grants

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications42

  1. pmc The buccohypophyseal canal is an ancestral vertebrate trait maintained by modulation in sonic hedgehog signaling
    Roman H Khonsari
    Department of Craniofacial Development and Stem Cell Research, Comprehensive Biomedical Research Center, Dental Institute, King s College London, London, UK
    BMC Biol 11:27. 2013
    ..Little is currently known about the formation and function of this structure. Here we have investigated molecular mechanisms driving the formation of the buccohypophyseal canal and their evolutionary significance...
  2. ncbi request reprint Bone voyage: an expedition into the molecular and cellular parameters affecting bone graft fate
    J A Helms
    Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford Medical School, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Bone 41:479-85. 2007
    ..Altogether, they form the foundation for survival of the bone graft and eventually for a positive clinical outcome of the procedure...
  3. ncbi request reprint New insights into craniofacial morphogenesis
    Jill A Helms
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Development 132:851-61. 2005
    ..Changes in craniofacial architecture also lie at the heart of evolutionary adaptation, as new studies in fish and fowl attest. Together, these findings reveal much about molecular and tissue interactions behind craniofacial development...
  4. doi request reprint Embryonic origin and Hox status determine progenitor cell fate during adult bone regeneration
    Philipp Leucht
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Development 135:2845-54. 2008
    ..Thus, embryonic origin and Hox gene expression status distinguish neural crest-derived from mesoderm-derived skeletal progenitor cells, and both characteristics influence the process of adult bone regeneration...
  5. ncbi request reprint Head, shoulders, knees, and toes
    Luis de la Fuente
    The Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Dev Biol 282:294-306. 2005
  6. ncbi request reprint Molecular interactions coordinating the development of the forebrain and face
    Ralph S Marcucio
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Dev Biol 284:48-61. 2005
    ....
  7. pmc A primary cilia-dependent etiology for midline facial disorders
    Samantha A Brugmann
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Hum Mol Genet 19:1577-92. 2010
    ..These data also raise the possibility that genes encoding ciliary proteins are candidates for human conditions of hypertelorism and FNDs...
  8. pmc Endochondral ossification is required for haematopoietic stem-cell niche formation
    Charles K F Chan
    Department of Pathology, Developmental Biology and Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University, California, USA
    Nature 457:490-4. 2009
    ..Collectively, our data implicate endochondral ossification, bone formation that proceeds through a cartilage intermediate, as a requirement for adult HSC niche formation...
  9. ncbi request reprint The molecular origins of species-specific facial pattern
    Samantha A Brugmann
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University, California 94305, USA
    Curr Top Dev Biol 73:1-42. 2006
    ....
  10. pmc Wnt and FGF signals interact to coordinate growth with cell fate specification during limb development
    Derk ten Berge
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Developmental Biology, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Development 135:3247-57. 2008
    ....
  11. pmc Primary cilia: cellular sensors for the skeleton
    Charles T Anderson
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Anat Rec (Hoboken) 291:1074-8. 2008
    ..We also raise several unanswered questions regarding the role of primary cilia as mechanosensors and chemosensors and identify potential research avenues to address these questions...
  12. pmc Role of Wnt signaling in the biology of the periodontium
    Scott M Rooker
    Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Dev Dyn 239:140-7. 2010
    ..We discuss these findings in the context of dental tissue regeneration...
  13. pmc A dermal HOX transcriptional program regulates site-specific epidermal fate
    John L Rinn
    Program in Epithelial Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Genes Dev 22:303-7. 2008
    ..Thus, maintenance of appropriate HOX transcriptional program in adult fibroblasts may serve as a source of positional memory to differentially pattern the epithelia during homeostasis and regeneration...
  14. pmc It's all in your head: new insights into craniofacial development and deformation
    Minal D Tapadia
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Anat 207:461-77. 2005
  15. pmc rBMP represses Wnt signaling and influences skeletal progenitor cell fate specification during bone repair
    Steve Minear
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Bone Miner Res 25:1196-207. 2010
    ..These mechanistic insights may be particularly useful for optimizing the reparative potential of rBMPs while simultaneously minimizing their adverse outcomes...
  16. pmc The fickle finger of fate
    Luis de la Fuente
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Clin Invest 115:833-6. 2005
    ..The existence of such a repressor provides a window into the distant past, revealing that Shh and Ihh must once have shared responsibilities in establishing tissue boundaries and orchestrating vertebrate tissue morphogenesis...
  17. ncbi request reprint Cranial suture biology
    Kelly A Lenton
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5148, USA
    Curr Top Dev Biol 66:287-328. 2005
  18. ncbi request reprint Bone regeneration is regulated by wnt signaling
    Jae Beom Kim
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    J Bone Miner Res 22:1913-23. 2007
    ..Herein, we studied the role of Wnt signaling in skeletal tissue regeneration...
  19. ncbi request reprint Stage-dependent craniofacial defects resulting from Sprouty2 overexpression
    L Henry Goodnough
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Dev Dyn 236:1918-28. 2007
    ..Collectively, these data suggest that Sprouty2 plays a role in the outgrowth of facial prominences independent of canonical Fgf signaling...
  20. pmc Functional demarcation of active and silent chromatin domains in human HOX loci by noncoding RNAs
    John L Rinn
    Program in Epithelial Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Cell 129:1311-23. 2007
    ..Thus, transcription of ncRNA may demarcate chromosomal domains of gene silencing at a distance; these results have broad implications for gene regulation in development and disease states...
  21. pmc CHD7 cooperates with PBAF to control multipotent neural crest formation
    Ruchi Bajpai
    Department of Chemical and Systems Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nature 463:958-62. 2010
    ....
  22. doi request reprint Wnt proteins promote bone regeneration
    Steven Minear
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Sci Transl Med 2:29ra30. 2010
    ..The end result was faster bone regeneration. Because Wnt signaling is conserved in mammalian tissue repair, this protein-based approach may have widespread applications in regenerative medicine...
  23. ncbi request reprint Markers of osteoblast differentiation in fusing and nonfusing cranial sutures
    Randall P Nacamuli
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 112:1328-35. 2003
    ....
  24. ncbi request reprint Wnt signaling mediates regional specification in the vertebrate face
    Samantha A Brugmann
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Development 134:3283-95. 2007
    ..Collectively, these data elucidate a new role for Wnt signaling in regional specification of the vertebrate face, and suggest possible mechanisms whereby species-specific facial features are generated...
  25. pmc Effect of mechanical stimuli on skeletal regeneration around implants
    Philipp Leucht
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University, 257 Campus Drive, PSRL Building, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Bone 40:919-30. 2007
    ..By comparing strain measurements with cellular and molecular analyses, we developed an understanding of the correlation between strain magnitudes and fate decisions of cells shaping the skeletal regenerate...
  26. doi request reprint Beta-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling in mandibular bone regeneration
    Philipp Leucht
    Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University Medical School, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    J Bone Joint Surg Am 90:3-8. 2008
    ..Taken together, these data underscore the functional requirement for Wnt signaling in cranial skeletal healing...
  27. pmc Accelerated bone repair after plasma laser corticotomies
    Philipp Leucht
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
    Ann Surg 246:140-50. 2007
    ..To reveal, on a cellular and molecular level, how skeletal regeneration of a corticotomy is enhanced when using laser-plasma mediated ablation compared with conventional mechanical tissue removal...
  28. pmc FAK-Mediated mechanotransduction in skeletal regeneration
    Philipp Leucht
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 2:e390. 2007
    ..Our data provide a new framework in which to consider how physical forces and molecular signals are synchronized during the program of skeletal regeneration...
  29. pmc Mepe is expressed during skeletal development and regeneration
    Chuanyong Lu
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California at San Francisco, 533 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143 0514, USA
    Histochem Cell Biol 121:493-9. 2004
    ..Thus, Mepe appears to play a role in both long bone regeneration and the latter stages of skeletogenesis...
  30. ncbi request reprint Conserved molecular program regulating cranial and appendicular skeletogenesis
    B Frank Eames
    Dev Dyn 231:4-13. 2004
    ....
  31. ncbi request reprint Cross-regulatory interactions between Fgf8 and Shh in the avian frontonasal prominence
    Arhat Abzhanov
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Congenit Anom (Kyoto) 47:136-48. 2007
    ..Our experiments revealed mutual antagonism between the two molecules, which aids in establishing and maintaining a molecular boundary that subsequently influences patterning and growth of the middle and upper face...
  32. ncbi request reprint Sonic hedgehog in the pharyngeal endoderm controls arch pattern via regulation of Fgf8 in head ectoderm
    Kim E Haworth
    Department of Craniofacial Development, Dental Institute, Kings College London, London SE1 9RT, UK
    Dev Biol 303:244-58. 2007
    ..Shh from the pharyngeal endoderm thus regulates Fgf8 in the ectoderm and the role of the endoderm in pharyngeal arch patterning may thus be indirectly mediated by the ectoderm...
  33. ncbi request reprint Hierarchy revealed in the specification of three skeletal fates by Sox9 and Runx2
    B Frank Eames
    UCSF Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA 94143 0514, USA
    Dev Biol 274:188-200. 2004
    ..Finally, these data provide insights into the roles that master regulatory genes play during evolutionary change of the vertebrate skeleton...
  34. ncbi request reprint Indian hedgehog synchronizes skeletal angiogenesis and perichondrial maturation with cartilage development
    Celine Colnot
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 0514, USA
    Development 132:1057-67. 2005
    ....
  35. ncbi request reprint Prenatal morphogenesis of the human mental foramen
    Ralf J Radlanski
    Freie Universitat Berlin, University Clinic Benjamin Franklin, Department of Experimental Dentistry and Oral Structural Biology, Berlin Wilmersdorf, Germany
    Eur J Oral Sci 110:452-9. 2002
    ..In the future, to understand the mechanisms regulating this complex system, where a nerve and blood vessels became successively surrounded by bone, molecular biological data have to be correlated with morphological findings...
  36. ncbi request reprint A model for intramembranous ossification during fracture healing
    Zachary Thompson
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California at San Francisco, 94143 0514, USA
    J Orthop Res 20:1091-8. 2002
    ..Future studies will use this murine model of intramembranous fracture healing to explore, at a molecular level, how the mechanical environment exerts its influence on healing of a fracture...
  37. ncbi request reprint A zone of frontonasal ectoderm regulates patterning and growth in the face
    Diane Hu
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, 533 Parnassus Avenue, Suite U 453, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Development 130:1749-58. 2003
    ..We discuss these data in the context of boundary/morphogen models of patterning, and in view of the recent controversy regarding neural crest pre-patterning versus neural crest plasticity...
  38. pmc Altered fracture repair in the absence of MMP9
    Celine Colnot
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143 0514, USA
    Development 130:4123-33. 2003
    ....
  39. ncbi request reprint Molecular ontogeny of the skeleton
    B Frank Eames
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California at San Francisco, California, USA
    Birth Defects Res C Embryo Today 69:93-101. 2003
    ..In this review, we survey these molecules and the tissue interactions that may regulate their expression. What emerges is a new paradigm, by which we can explain and understand the process of normal- and abnormal-skeletal development...
  40. ncbi request reprint Distinguishing the contributions of the perichondrium, cartilage, and vascular endothelium to skeletal development
    Celine Colnot
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143 0514, USA
    Dev Biol 269:55-69. 2004
    ..Collectively, these studies clarify further the contributions of the cartilage, perichondrium, and vascular endothelium to long bone development...
  41. pmc Temporal perturbations in sonic hedgehog signaling elicit the spectrum of holoprosencephaly phenotypes
    Dwight Cordero
    University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA
    J Clin Invest 114:485-94. 2004
    ..Collectively, these data reveal one mechanism by which the variable expressivity of a disorder such as HPE can be produced through temporal disruption of a single molecular pathway...
  42. pmc Effects of delayed stabilization on fracture healing
    Theodore Miclau
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California at San Francisco, 1001 Potrero Avenue, San Francisco, California 94110, USA
    J Orthop Res 25:1552-8. 2007
    ....

Research Grants11

  1. BIOMIMETICS OF BONE REGENERATION
    Jill Helms; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..Collectively, these results on the biomimetics of bone regeneration will provide a sound scientific basis for the treatment of musculoskeletal diseases and injuries. ..
  2. MORPHOGENESIS OF CRANIOFACIAL PRIMORDIA
    Jill Helms; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Taken together, results from these experiments will provide us with new clues as to how the vertebrate face achieves its extraordinarily intricate pattern. ..
  3. Marrow-derived stem cells in cranial skeletal repair
    Jill Helms; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..This project is significant in using a novel approach to investigate regulation of fracture repair and will provide valuable insights on healing defect. ..
  4. MECHANISMS OF NORMAL AND ABNORMAL CRANIOFACIAL MORPHOGEN
    Jill Helms; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..abstract_text> ..