Geoffrey C Gurtner

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Wound repair and regeneration
    Geoffrey C Gurtner
    Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Institute of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 5148, USA
    Nature 453:314-21. 2008
  2. ncbi request reprint Age decreases endothelial progenitor cell recruitment through decreases in hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha stabilization during ischemia
    Eric I Chang
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Circulation 116:2818-29. 2007
  3. pmc Therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cutaneous wound healing
    Jerry S Chen
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University Stanford, CA, USA
    Front Immunol 3:192. 2012
  4. pmc An information theoretic, microfluidic-based single cell analysis permits identification of subpopulations among putatively homogeneous stem cells
    Jason P Glotzbach
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e21211. 2011
  5. pmc Surgical approaches to create murine models of human wound healing
    Victor W Wong
    Department of Surgery, Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University, 257 Campus Drive, GK210, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Biomed Biotechnol 2011:969618. 2011
  6. ncbi request reprint Organ-level tissue engineering using bioreactor systems and stem cells: implications for transplant surgery
    Robert C Rennert
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, 257 Campus Drive West, Hagey Building GK 201, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Curr Stem Cell Res Ther 9:2-9. 2014
  7. pmc Intraoperative laser angiography using the SPY system: review of the literature and recommendations for use
    Geoffrey C Gurtner
    Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Ann Surg Innov Res 7:1. 2013
  8. ncbi request reprint Progress and potential for regenerative medicine
    Geoffrey C Gurtner
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Med 58:299-312. 2007
  9. pmc Adipose-derived stromal cells overexpressing vascular endothelial growth factor accelerate mouse excisional wound healing
    Allison Nauta
    Hagey Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery and Institute of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Mol Ther 21:445-55. 2013
  10. pmc Mesenchymal stem cells can participate in ischemic neovascularization
    Cynthia Hamou
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 123:45S-55S. 2009

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications99

  1. doi request reprint Wound repair and regeneration
    Geoffrey C Gurtner
    Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Institute of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 5148, USA
    Nature 453:314-21. 2008
    ..Knowledge gained from studying such organisms might help to unlock latent regenerative pathways in humans, which would change medical practice as much as the introduction of antibiotics did in the twentieth century...
  2. ncbi request reprint Age decreases endothelial progenitor cell recruitment through decreases in hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha stabilization during ischemia
    Eric I Chang
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Circulation 116:2818-29. 2007
    ..Advanced age is known to impair neovascularization. Because endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) participate in this process, we examined the effects of aging on EPC recruitment and vascular incorporation...
  3. pmc Therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cutaneous wound healing
    Jerry S Chen
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University Stanford, CA, USA
    Front Immunol 3:192. 2012
    ..This review discusses the proposed biological contributions of MSCs to cutaneous repair and their clinical potential in cell-based therapies...
  4. pmc An information theoretic, microfluidic-based single cell analysis permits identification of subpopulations among putatively homogeneous stem cells
    Jason P Glotzbach
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e21211. 2011
    ..We anticipate that this analytic framework can also be applied to other cell types to elucidate the relationship between transcriptional and phenotypic variation...
  5. pmc Surgical approaches to create murine models of human wound healing
    Victor W Wong
    Department of Surgery, Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University, 257 Campus Drive, GK210, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Biomed Biotechnol 2011:969618. 2011
    ..This paper aims to highlight common surgical mouse models of cutaneous disease and to provide investigators with a better understanding of the benefits and limitations of these models for translational applications...
  6. ncbi request reprint Organ-level tissue engineering using bioreactor systems and stem cells: implications for transplant surgery
    Robert C Rennert
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, 257 Campus Drive West, Hagey Building GK 201, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Curr Stem Cell Res Ther 9:2-9. 2014
    ..These promising bioreactor-based strategies have the potential to expand the reconstructive applications of VCA, and could one day allow the fabrication of customized complex tissue grafts. ..
  7. pmc Intraoperative laser angiography using the SPY system: review of the literature and recommendations for use
    Geoffrey C Gurtner
    Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
    Ann Surg Innov Res 7:1. 2013
    ....
  8. ncbi request reprint Progress and potential for regenerative medicine
    Geoffrey C Gurtner
    Children s Surgical Research Program, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Med 58:299-312. 2007
    ....
  9. pmc Adipose-derived stromal cells overexpressing vascular endothelial growth factor accelerate mouse excisional wound healing
    Allison Nauta
    Hagey Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery and Institute of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Mol Ther 21:445-55. 2013
    ..Our results demonstrate the efficacy of using nonviral-engineered ASCs to accelerate wound healing, which may provide an alternative therapy for treating many diseases in which wound healing is impaired...
  10. pmc Mesenchymal stem cells can participate in ischemic neovascularization
    Cynthia Hamou
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 123:45S-55S. 2009
    ..The authors identify mesenchymal stem cells as a bone marrow-derived progenitor population that is able to engraft into peripheral tissue in response to ischemia...
  11. doi request reprint IFATS collection: Adipose stromal cells adopt a proangiogenic phenotype under the influence of hypoxia
    Hariharan Thangarajah
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5148, USA
    Stem Cells 27:266-74. 2009
    ....
  12. pmc The molecular basis for impaired hypoxia-induced VEGF expression in diabetic tissues
    Hariharan Thangarajah
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive, GK 201, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:13505-10. 2009
    ..These findings define molecular defects that underlie impaired VEGF production in diabetic tissues and offer a promising direction for therapeutic intervention...
  13. doi request reprint Engineered pullulan-collagen composite dermal hydrogels improve early cutaneous wound healing
    Victor W Wong
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Tissue Eng Part A 17:631-44. 2011
    ..These novel biomatrices can potentially serve as a structured delivery template for cells and biomolecules in regenerative skin applications...
  14. ncbi request reprint HIF-1alpha dysfunction in diabetes
    Hariharan Thangarajah
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Cell Cycle 9:75-9. 2010
    ..Since DFO has been in clinical use for decades, the potential of this drug to treat a variety of ischemic conditions in humans can be evaluated relatively quickly...
  15. pmc Isolation of human adipose-derived stromal cells using laser-assisted liposuction and their therapeutic potential in regenerative medicine
    Michael T Chung
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Division, Department of Surgery, and
    Stem Cells Transl Med 2:808-17. 2013
    ..05). Therefore, as laser-assisted liposuction appears to negatively impact the biology of ASCs, cell harvest using suction-assisted liposuction is preferable for tissue-engineering purposes. ..
  16. pmc Tissue engineering using autologous microcirculatory beds as vascularized bioscaffolds
    Edward I Chang
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    FASEB J 23:906-15. 2009
    ..By using the vascular network of EMBs, EMBs can be perfused ex vivo and seeded with stem cells, which can potentially be directed to differentiate into neo-organs or transfected to replace failing organs and deficient proteins...
  17. doi request reprint Focal adhesion kinase links mechanical force to skin fibrosis via inflammatory signaling
    Victor W Wong
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Nat Med 18:148-52. 2012
    ..These findings collectively indicate that physical force regulates fibrosis through inflammatory FAK-ERK-MCP-1 pathways and that molecular strategies targeting FAK can effectively uncouple mechanical force from pathologic scar formation...
  18. pmc Aging and diabetes impair the neovascular potential of adipose-derived stromal cells
    Samyra El-ftesi
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 123:475-85. 2009
    ..The authors explored the intrinsic neovascular potential of adipose-derived stromal cells in the setting of advanced age and in type 1 and type 2 diabetes...
  19. doi request reprint Pullulan hydrogels improve mesenchymal stem cell delivery into high-oxidative-stress wounds
    Victor W Wong
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Macromol Biosci 11:1458-66. 2011
    ..The results suggest that glucan hydrogel systems may prove beneficial for progenitor-cell-based approaches to skin regeneration...
  20. pmc Enhancement of human adipose-derived stromal cell angiogenesis through knockdown of a BMP-2 inhibitor
    Benjamin Levi
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Division, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 129:53-66. 2012
    ....
  21. doi request reprint SDF-1 alpha expression during wound healing in the aged is HIF dependent
    Shang A Loh
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, 257 Campus Drive, GK 201, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 123:65S-75S. 2009
    ..Thus, the authors examined the relative importance of interleukin (IL)-1 beta and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 alpha on SDF-1 alpha expression in aged wound healing...
  22. doi request reprint The basic science of vascular biology: implications for the practicing surgeon
    Jason P Glotzbach
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 126:1528-38. 2010
    ....
  23. doi request reprint Molecular analysis and differentiation capacity of adipose-derived stem cells from lymphedema tissue
    Benjamin Levi
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive West, Hagey Building, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 132:580-9. 2013
    ..Liposuction to address the adipose nature of the lymphedema has provided an opportunity for a detailed analysis of the stromal fraction of lymphedema-associated fat to clarify the molecular mechanisms for this adipogenic transformation...
  24. doi request reprint Nonintegrating knockdown and customized scaffold design enhances human adipose-derived stem cells in skeletal repair
    Benjamin Levi
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Division, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5148, USA
    Stem Cells 29:2018-29. 2011
    ..This study therefore suggests that genetic targeting of hASCs combined with custom scaffold design can optimize hASCs for skeletal regenerative medicine...
  25. pmc Enhancement of mesenchymal stem cell angiogenic capacity and stemness by a biomimetic hydrogel scaffold
    Kristine C Rustad
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University, GK 201, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Biomaterials 33:80-90. 2012
    ..Our data suggest that biomimetic hydrogels provide a functional niche capable of augmenting MSC regenerative potential and enhancing wound healing...
  26. doi request reprint Mechanical force prolongs acute inflammation via T-cell-dependent pathways during scar formation
    Victor W Wong
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, 257 Campus Dr, GK 201, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    FASEB J 25:4498-510. 2011
    ....
  27. doi request reprint Improving cutaneous scar formation by controlling the mechanical environment: large animal and phase I studies
    Geoffrey C Gurtner
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Ann Surg 254:217-25. 2011
    ..To test the hypothesis that the mechanical environment of cutaneous wounds can control scar formation...
  28. ncbi request reprint Biological therapies for the treatment of cutaneous wounds: phase III and launched therapies
    Robert C Rennert
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, 257 Campus Drive West, Hagey Building GK106, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Expert Opin Biol Ther 13:1523-41. 2013
    ..There are a variety of available and emerging technologies utilizing this approach that have demonstrated the ability to augment wound healing...
  29. pmc In vivo directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells for skeletal regeneration
    Benjamin Levi
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Division, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:20379-84. 2012
    ....
  30. doi request reprint Akt-mediated mechanotransduction in murine fibroblasts during hypertrophic scar formation
    Josemaria Paterno
    Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Wound Repair Regen 19:49-58. 2011
    ..Future studies are needed to fully elucidate the critical mechanotransduction components and pathways which activate skin fibrosis...
  31. doi request reprint Hypoxia, hormones, and endothelial progenitor cells in hemangioma
    Edward I Chang
    Stanford University Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Lymphat Res Biol 5:237-43. 2007
    ..In this model, increased stabilization of HIF-1 in concert with increased levels of estrogen create a milieu that promotes new blood vessel development, ultimately contributing to the pathogenesis of infantile hemangiomas...
  32. doi request reprint Soft tissue mechanotransduction in wound healing and fibrosis
    Victor W Wong
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Semin Cell Dev Biol 23:981-6. 2012
    ..Strategies to manipulate these biomechanical signaling networks have tremendous therapeutic potential to reduce scar formation and promote skin regeneration...
  33. ncbi request reprint Gene expression in fetal murine keratinocytes and fibroblasts
    Michael S Hu
    Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California Department of Surgery, John A Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawai i, Honolulu, Hawai i
    J Surg Res 190:344-57. 2014
    ....
  34. ncbi request reprint Adult stem cells in small animal wound healing models
    Allison C Nauta
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric and Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Institute of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 1037:81-98. 2013
    ..Finally, the chapter includes a materials and methods section that provides an in-depth description of adult tissue harvest techniques. ..
  35. ncbi request reprint The role of stem cells in aesthetic surgery: fact or fiction?
    Adrian McArdle
    Stanford, Calif From the Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, and the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University
    Plast Reconstr Surg 134:193-200. 2014
    ....
  36. pmc Evidence that mast cells are not required for healing of splinted cutaneous excisional wounds in mice
    Allison C Nauta
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e59167. 2013
    ..These data indicate that mast cells do not play a significant non-redundant role in these features of the healing of splinted full thickness excisional cutaneous wounds in mice...
  37. doi request reprint Tissue engineering for the management of chronic wounds: current concepts and future perspectives
    Victor W Wong
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Exp Dermatol 21:729-34. 2012
    ..In this viewpoint essay, we highlight the current concepts in tissue engineering for chronic wounds and speculate on areas for future research in this increasingly interdisciplinary field...
  38. pmc Antimycotic ciclopirox olamine in the diabetic environment promotes angiogenesis and enhances wound healing
    Sae Hee Ko
    Hagey Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e27844. 2011
    ..These findings offer a promising new topical pharmacologic therapy for the treatment of diabetic wounds...
  39. doi request reprint Treating chronic wound infections with genetically modified free flaps
    Shadi Ghali
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif 94305, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 123:1157-68. 2009
    ..The authors have previously demonstrated the feasibility of protein delivery via microvascular free flap gene therapy and here they examine this approach for recalcitrant infections...
  40. ncbi request reprint Using genetically modified microvascular free flaps to deliver local cancer immunotherapy with minimal systemic toxicity
    Marlese P Dempsey
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 121:1541-53. 2008
    ..The authors' laboratory has developed an ex vivo technique to genetically modify free flaps to deliver immunotherapy locally without systemic toxicity...
  41. ncbi request reprint Studies in fat grafting: part I. Effects of injection technique on in vitro fat viability and in vivo volume retention
    Michael T Chung
    Stanford, Menlo Park, and Palo Alto, Calif From the Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Division, and the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine the Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University School of Medicine and Engineering the TauTona Group and the Plastic Surgery Center of Palo Alto
    Plast Reconstr Surg 134:29-38. 2014
    ..In this study, the authors compare the biological properties of fat following injection using two methods...
  42. ncbi request reprint Mechanotransduction and fibrosis
    Dominik Duscher
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Biomech 47:1997-2005. 2014
    ..This review provides an overview of our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying scar formation, with an emphasis on the relationship between mechanotransduction pathways and their therapeutic implications. ..
  43. ncbi request reprint Tracking the elusive fibrocyte: identification and characterization of collagen-producing hematopoietic lineage cells during murine wound healing
    Hirotaka Suga
    Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Stem Cells 32:1347-60. 2014
    ....
  44. doi request reprint From germ theory to germ therapy: skin microbiota, chronic wounds, and probiotics
    Victor W Wong
    Portland, Ore and Stanford, Calif From the Department of Surgery, Oregon Health and Science University and Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University
    Plast Reconstr Surg 132:854e-861e. 2013
    ..Probiotics are bacteria or yeast that confer a health benefit on the host and may have a role in preventing and treating nonhealing wounds by modulating host-microbe interactions...
  45. pmc Stem cell recruitment after injury: lessons for regenerative medicine
    Robert C Rennert
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive West, Hagey Building GK 201, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Regen Med 7:833-50. 2012
    ..This article discusses the function and mechanisms of recruitment of important bone marrow-derived stem and progenitor cell populations following injury, as well as the emerging therapeutic applications targeting these cells...
  46. doi request reprint A novel mouse model for frostbite injury
    Lauren J Auerbach
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Wilderness Environ Med 24:94-104. 2013
    ..To screen drugs and other field therapies that might improve the outcome for a frostbite victim, it would be helpful to have a reliable and cost-effective preclinical in vivo model...
  47. pmc CD105 protein depletion enhances human adipose-derived stromal cell osteogenesis through reduction of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) signaling
    Benjamin Levi
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Division, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Biol Chem 286:39497-509. 2011
    ..These findings thus highlight a potential avenue to promote osteogenesis in adipose-derived mesenchymal cells for skeletal regeneration...
  48. pmc Stem cells: update and impact on craniofacial surgery
    Benjamin Levi
    From the Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine Research Laboratory and Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Division, Department of Surgery, and Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
    J Craniofac Surg 23:319-23. 2012
    ....
  49. ncbi request reprint Studies in Fat Grafting: Part II. Effects of Injection Mechanics on Material Properties of Fat
    David Atashroo
    Stanford, Menlo Park, and Palo Alto, Calif From the Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Division, and the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine the Departments of Materials Science and Engineering and Bioengineering, Stanford University the TauTona Group and the Plastic Surgery Center of Palo Alto
    Plast Reconstr Surg 134:39-46. 2014
    ..In this study, the authors compared physical properties of fat following injection using an automated, low-shear device or the modified Coleman technique...
  50. doi request reprint The embrace device significantly decreases scarring following scar revision surgery in a randomized controlled trial
    Angeline F Lim
    Palo Alto, Stanford, and Menlo Park, Calif From the Duet Plastic Surgery Clinic the Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine and Neodyne Biosciences, Inc
    Plast Reconstr Surg 133:398-405. 2014
    ..In this article, the authors report that the embrace device, which uses principles of mechanomodulation, significantly improves aesthetic outcomes following scar revision surgery...
  51. pmc Epidermal or Dermal Specific Knockout of PHD-2 Enhances Wound Healing and Minimizes Ischemic Injury
    Andrew S Zimmermann
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 9:e93373. 2014
    ..The roles of PHD-2 in the epidermis and dermis have not been clearly defined in wound healing...
  52. doi request reprint Wound healing: a paradigm for regeneration
    Victor W Wong
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Mayo Clin Proc 88:1022-31. 2013
    ..In this review, we highlight current concepts in cutaneous wound repair and propose that many of these evolving paradigms may underlie regenerative processes across diverse organ systems. ..
  53. pmc Enabling stem cell therapies for tissue repair: current and future challenges
    Victor W Wong
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 257 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Biotechnol Adv 31:744-51. 2013
    ..Future challenges include refining the therapeutic manipulation of stem cells, validating these technologies in randomized clinical trials, and regulating the global expansion of regenerative stem cell therapies. ..
  54. doi request reprint Stem cells
    Bjorn Behr
    Hagey Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, and Institute of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 126:1163-71. 2010
    ....
  55. doi request reprint Pushing back: wound mechanotransduction in repair and regeneration
    Victor W Wong
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Invest Dermatol 131:2186-96. 2011
    ..An improved understanding of these interactions will facilitate the development of novel biophysical materials and mechanomodulatory approaches to augment wound repair and regeneration...
  56. doi request reprint The role of stem cells in cutaneous wound healing: what do we really know?
    Sae Hee Ko
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric and Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Institute of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 127:10S-20S. 2011
    ..The rapidly developing fields of stem cell biology and skin tissue engineering create translational opportunities for the development of novel stem cell-based wound-healing therapies...
  57. ncbi request reprint Studies in Fat Grafting: Part III. Fat Grafting Irradiated Tissue-Improved Skin Quality and Decreased Fat Graft Retention
    Rebecca M Garza
    Stanford, Calif From the Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Division, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine and the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University
    Plast Reconstr Surg 134:249-57. 2014
    ..The present study evaluated the effect of fat grafting on irradiated skin, along with fat graft quality and retention rates in irradiated tissue...
  58. doi request reprint Regenerative surgery: tissue engineering in general surgical practice
    Victor W Wong
    Department of Surgery, Oregon Health and Science University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR 97239, USA
    World J Surg 36:2288-99. 2012
    ..By exploiting this intrinsic potential of the body, we can move even closer to developing functional, autologous replacement parts for a wide range of surgical diseases...
  59. pmc Strategies for organ level tissue engineering
    Kristine C Rustad
    Stanford University, Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Organogenesis 6:151-7. 2010
    ..Ultimately, the successful translation of tissue-engineered constructs into everyday clinical practice will depend upon the ability of the tissue engineer to "scale up" every aspect of the research and development process...
  60. pmc Decreasing intracellular superoxide corrects defective ischemia-induced new vessel formation in diabetic mice
    Daniel J Ceradini
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5148, USA
    J Biol Chem 283:10930-8. 2008
    ..These results provide a basis for the rational design of new therapeutics to normalize impaired ischemia-induced vasculogenesis in patients with diabetes...
  61. ncbi request reprint Comparative healing of surgical incisions created by the PEAK PlasmaBlade, conventional electrosurgery, and a scalpel
    Shang A Loh
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 124:1849-59. 2009
    ....
  62. doi request reprint The role of focal adhesion complexes in fibroblast mechanotransduction during scar formation
    Kristine C Rustad
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Differentiation 86:87-91. 2013
    ....
  63. pmc Stem cell niches for skin regeneration
    Victor W Wong
    Department of Surgery, Oregon Health and Science University, 3181 Southwest Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR 97239, USA
    Int J Biomater 2012:926059. 2012
    ..Innovative biomaterial systems that successfully recapitulate these microenvironments will facilitate progenitor cell-mediated skin repair and regeneration...
  64. doi request reprint Vascular anastomosis using controlled phase transitions in poloxamer gels
    Edward I Chang
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford, California, USA
    Nat Med 17:1147-52. 2011
    ..This new technology has potential for improving efficiency and outcomes in the surgical treatment of cardiovascular disease...
  65. ncbi request reprint Tissue engineering in plastic surgery: a review
    Victor W Wong
    Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 126:858-68. 2010
    ..This review highlights fundamental principles of bioengineering, recent progress in tissue-specific engineering, and future directions for this exciting and rapidly evolving area of medicine...
  66. doi request reprint Diabetes increases p53-mediated apoptosis following ischemia
    Leila Jazayeri
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford Calif 94305, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 121:1135-43. 2008
    ..Because increases in apoptosis have been linked to a spectrum of diabetic complications, the authors examined whether programmed cell death is involved in the pathogenesis of poor diabetic tissue responses to ischemia...
  67. ncbi request reprint Osteoblasts stimulated with pulsed electromagnetic fields increase HUVEC proliferation via a VEGF-A independent mechanism
    Richard A Hopper
    Department of Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105, USA
    Bioelectromagnetics 30:189-97. 2009
    ....
  68. pmc Reduced BMPR2 expression induces GM-CSF translation and macrophage recruitment in humans and mice to exacerbate pulmonary hypertension
    Hirofumi Sawada
    The Vera Moulton Wall Center for Pulmonary Vascular Disease, 2 Department of Pediatrics, 3 Department of Surgery, 4 Department of Microbiology and Immunology, 5 Department of Medicine, and 6 Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305
    J Exp Med 211:263-80. 2014
    ..Thus, reduced BMPR2 can subvert a stress granule response, heighten GM-CSF mRNA translation, increase inflammatory cell recruitment, and exacerbate PAH. ..
  69. pmc Paracrine mechanism of angiogenesis in adipose-derived stem cell transplantation
    Hirotaka Suga
    From the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
    Ann Plast Surg 72:234-41. 2014
    ..Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have shown potential for cell-based therapy in the field of plastic surgery. However, the fate of ASCs after transplantation and the mechanism(s) of their biologic capabilities remain unclear...
  70. pmc Hypertrophic scar formation following burns and trauma: new approaches to treatment
    Shahram Aarabi
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS Med 4:e234. 2007
  71. doi request reprint Intraoperative perfusion mapping with laser-assisted indocyanine green imaging can predict and prevent complications in immediate breast reconstruction
    Ewa Komorowska-Timek
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif 94305 5148, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 125:1065-73. 2010
    ..Aside from clinical experience, there are no reliable tools to assist the novice surgeon with intraoperative assessment of tissue viability...
  72. doi request reprint The SNaP system: biomechanical and animal model testing of a novel ultraportable negative-pressure wound therapy system
    Kenton D Fong
    Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 125:1362-71. 2010
    ..The Smart Negative Pressure (SNaP) System (Spiracur, Inc., Sunnyvale, Calif.) is a novel ultraportable negative-pressure wound therapy system that does not require an electrically powered pump...
  73. ncbi request reprint Murine models of human wound healing
    Jerry S Chen
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 1037:265-74. 2013
    ..Here we describe three reproducible murine wound healing models that recapitulate the human wound healing process. ..
  74. pmc Human skin wounds: a major and snowballing threat to public health and the economy
    Chandan K Sen
    Department of Surgery, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Wound Center, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA
    Wound Repair Regen 17:763-71. 2009
    ..The immense economic and social impact of wounds in our society calls for allocation of a higher level of attention and resources to understand biological mechanisms underlying cutaneous wound complications...
  75. ncbi request reprint Hypoxia-induced mediators of stem/progenitor cell trafficking are increased in children with hemangioma
    Mark E Kleinman
    Stanford University, Department of Surgery, PSRL, GK 201, 257 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA, 94305 5148, USA
    Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 27:2664-70. 2007
    ..We examined whether these mediators of EPC trafficking are upregulated during the proliferation of infantile hemangioma...
  76. ncbi request reprint Plastic surgical delivery systems for targeted gene therapy
    Shadi Ghali
    Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5148, USA
    Ann Plast Surg 60:323-32. 2008
    ..This delivery system achieves targeted high-level transgene expression with minimal demonstrable systemic toxicity. Advances in delivery systems are essential for translating basic research into clinical therapeutics...
  77. ncbi request reprint Mechanical load initiates hypertrophic scar formation through decreased cellular apoptosis
    Shahram Aarabi
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    FASEB J 21:3250-61. 2007
    ..We conclude that mechanical loading early in the proliferative phase of wound healing produces hypertrophic scars by inhibiting cellular apoptosis through an Akt-dependent mechanism...
  78. pmc Imaging the unfolded protein response in primary tumors reveals microenvironments with metabolic variations that predict tumor growth
    Michael T Spiotto
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5152, USA
    Cancer Res 70:78-88. 2010
    ..Finally, XBP1-luciferase activity correlated with tumor growth rates. Visualizing distinct signaling pathways in primary tumors reveals unique tumor microenvironments with distinct metabolic signatures that can predict for tumor growth...
  79. doi request reprint Statistics in medicine
    Michael Januszyk
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif 94305, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 127:437-44. 2011
    ....
  80. ncbi request reprint Homing to hypoxia: HIF-1 as a mediator of progenitor cell recruitment to injured tissue
    Daniel J Ceradini
    Laboratory of Microvascular Research and Vascular Tissue Engineering, Institute of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA
    Trends Cardiovasc Med 15:57-63. 2005
    ..As such, ischemic tissue may represent a conditional stem cell niche, with recruitment and retention of circulating progenitors regulated by hypoxia through differential expression of SDF-1...
  81. ncbi request reprint Progenitor cell trafficking is regulated by hypoxic gradients through HIF-1 induction of SDF-1
    Daniel J Ceradini
    Laboratory of Microvascular Research and Vascular Tissue Engineering, Institute of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016, USA
    Nat Med 10:858-64. 2004
    ..These data show that the recruitment of CXCR4-positive progenitor cells to regenerating tissues is mediated by hypoxic gradients via HIF-1-induced expression of SDF-1...
  82. ncbi request reprint Quantitative and reproducible murine model of excisional wound healing
    Robert D Galiano
    Laboratory of Microvascular Research and Vascular Tissue Engineering, Institute of Reconstructive Surgery, New York University Medical Center, 560 First Avenue, New York, NY 10016, USA
    Wound Repair Regen 12:485-92. 2004
    ..Given these analogies to human wound healing, we believe that this technique is a useful model for the study of wound healing mechanisms and for the evaluation of new therapeutic modalities...
  83. ncbi request reprint Endothelial progenitor cells: the promise of vascular stem cells for plastic surgery
    Oren M Tepper
    Laboratory of Microvascular Research and Vascular Tissue Engineering, Institute of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, New York University Medical Center, NY 10016, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 111:846-54. 2003
  84. ncbi request reprint Adult vasculogenesis occurs through in situ recruitment, proliferation, and tubulization of circulating bone marrow-derived cells
    Oren M Tepper
    Laboratory of Microvascular Research and Vascular Tissue Engineering, New York University Medical Center, NY, USA
    Blood 105:1068-77. 2005
    ..We conclude that BM-derived cells produce new blood vessels via localized recruitment, proliferation, and differentiation of circulating cells in a sequence of events markedly different from existing paradigms of angiogenesis...
  85. ncbi request reprint Vascularized acellular dermal matrix island flaps for the repair of abdominal muscle defects
    Seum Chung
    Laboratory for Microvascular Research and Vascular Tissue Engineering, Institute of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, New York, NY 10016, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 111:225-32. 2003
    ..OPS imaging allowed for high-contrast direct visualization of microcirculation in previously acellular tissue following prefabrication with an arteriovenous unit...
  86. ncbi request reprint Increased circulating AC133+ CD34+ endothelial progenitor cells in children with hemangioma
    Mark E Kleinman
    Laboratory of Microvascular Research and Vascular Tissue Engineering, Institute of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, New York University, New York, New York, USA
    Lymphat Res Biol 1:301-7. 2003
    ..We have attempted to determine whether circulating EPCs are increased in hemangioma patients and thereby provide insight into the role of EPCs in hemangioma growth...
  87. pmc Topical vascular endothelial growth factor accelerates diabetic wound healing through increased angiogenesis and by mobilizing and recruiting bone marrow-derived cells
    Robert D Galiano
    Laboratory for Microvascular Research and Vascular Tissue Engineering, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA
    Am J Pathol 164:1935-47. 2004
    ..Thus, VEGF therapy may be useful in the treatment of diabetic complications characterized by impaired neovascularization...
  88. ncbi request reprint Stem cells and distraction osteogenesis: endothelial progenitor cells home to the ischemic generate in activation and consolidation
    Curtis L Cetrulo
    Institute of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, New York University Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 116:1053-64; discussion 1065-7. 2005
    ..The authors sought to determine the extent of ischemia in the distraction zone and whether endothelial progenitor cells home to the distraction zone and participate in local vasculogenesis...
  89. ncbi request reprint db/db mice exhibit severe wound-healing impairments compared with other murine diabetic strains in a silicone-splinted excisional wound model
    Joseph Michaels
    Laboratory of Microvascular Research and Vascular Tissue Engineering, Institute of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, New York University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA
    Wound Repair Regen 15:665-70. 2007
    ..As such, it was not possible to directly compare the results of this study with other studies that did not use this wound model...
  90. ncbi request reprint Human endothelial progenitor cells from type II diabetics exhibit impaired proliferation, adhesion, and incorporation into vascular structures
    Oren M Tepper
    Laboratory of Microvascular Research and Vascular Tissue Engineering, Institute of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, New York University Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA
    Circulation 106:2781-6. 2002
    ..Because diabetic complications occur in conditions in which EPC contributions have been demonstrated, EPC dysfunction may be important in their pathophysiology...
  91. ncbi request reprint Vascular delay revisited
    Shadi Ghali
    Department of Plastic Surgery, Royal Free Hospital, University of London, London, United Kingdom
    Plast Reconstr Surg 119:1735-44. 2007
    ..Greater understanding of the role these cells play in new blood vessel formation will be of considerable clinical benefit to high-risk patients in future applications of delay procedures...
  92. ncbi request reprint Diabetes impairs endothelial progenitor cell-mediated blood vessel formation in response to hypoxia
    Jennifer M Capla
    Laboratory of Microvascular Research and Vascular Tissue Engineering, Institute of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, New York University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 119:59-70. 2007
    ....
  93. ncbi request reprint Overview of the role for calreticulin in the enhancement of wound healing through multiple biological effects
    Leslie I Gold
    Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016, USA
    J Investig Dermatol Symp Proc 11:57-65. 2006
    ..Thus, CRT profoundly affects the wound healing process by recruiting cells essential for repair into the wound, stimulating cell growth, and increasing extracellular matrix production...
  94. ncbi request reprint Skin graft vascularization involves precisely regulated regression and replacement of endothelial cells through both angiogenesis and vasculogenesis
    Jennifer M Capla
    Laboratory of Microvascular Research and Vascular Tissue Engineering, Institute of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, New York University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 117:836-44. 2006
    ....
  95. ncbi request reprint Hyperglycemia-induced reactive oxygen species and impaired endothelial progenitor cell function
    Matthew J Callaghan
    The Laboratory of Microvascular Research and Vascular Tissue Engineering, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA
    Antioxid Redox Signal 7:1476-82. 2005
    ..Novel strategies aimed at reducing hyperglycemia-induced ROS may be a useful adjuvant to antihyperglycemic therapies in the restoration of vasculogenesis and the prevention of diabetic complications...
  96. ncbi request reprint Topical vascular endothelial growth factor reverses delayed wound healing secondary to angiogenesis inhibitor administration
    Joseph Michaels
    Laboratory of Microvascular Research and Vascular Tissue Engineering, Institute of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, New York University Medical Center, New York 10016, USA
    Wound Repair Regen 13:506-12. 2005
    ..This study shows that the angiogenesis inhibitor endostatin delays wound healing and that topical vascular endothelial growth factor is effective in counteracting this effect...
  97. ncbi request reprint Circulating endothelial progenitor cells and vascular anomalies
    Mark E Kleinman
    Laboratory of Microvascular Research and Vascular Tissue Engineering, Institute of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, New York University, TH 169, New York, NY, USA
    Lymphat Res Biol 3:234-9. 2005
    ..In this review, we discuss early studies that have investigated stem/progenitor cell involvement in the pathophysiology of infantile hemangioma and other congenital vascular anomalies...
  98. doi request reprint Pulsed electromagnetic fields accelerate normal and diabetic wound healing by increasing endogenous FGF-2 release
    Matthew J Callaghan
    Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, Calif, USA
    Plast Reconstr Surg 121:130-41. 2008
    ....

Research Grants13

  1. Explanted Vascular Beds for Complex Tissue Engineering
    Geoffrey Gurtner; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..abstract_text> ..
  2. Progenitor Cell Dysfunction and Impaired Neovascularization in Diabetes
    GEOFFREY C contact GURTNER; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..This proposal takes an innovative approach to elucidate this dysfunction and find new ways to approach diagnosis and treatment of diabetic vascular complications. ..
  3. Impaired Stem Cell Trafficking in Complications of Aging
    Geoffrey Gurtner; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..We believe that understanding age related defects in stem cell trafficking will be important for the design of rational therapeutics to prevent and treat vascular aging. ..
  4. Inside-Out Tissue Engineering for Organ Fabrication
    Michael T Longaker; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....
  5. Impaired Stem Cell Trafficking in Complications of Aging
    Geoffrey Gurtner; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..We believe that understanding age related defects in stem cell trafficking will be important for the design of rational therapeutics to prevent and treat vascular aging. ..
  6. Progenitor Cell Dysfunction and Impaired Vasculogenesis in Diabetic Complications
    Geoffrey Gurtner; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..for the rational development of novel strategies to restore normal compensatory vasculogenesis in diabetes, thus preventing the poor outcome of cardiovascular events (Ml, stroke, amputation) associated with the disease ..
  7. Progenitor Cell Dysfunction and Impaired Vasculogenesis
    Geoffrey Gurtner; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..for the rational development of novel strategies to restore normal compensatory vasculogenesis in diabetes, thus preventing the poor outcome of cardiovascular events (Ml, stroke, amputation) associated with the disease ..
  8. Progenitor Cell Dysfunction and Impaired Vasculogenesis
    Geoffrey Gurtner; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..for the rational development of novel strategies to restore normal compensatory vasculogenesis in diabetes, thus preventing the poor outcome of cardiovascular events (Ml, stroke, amputation) associated with the disease ..
  9. Impaired Stem Cell Trafficking in Complications of Aging
    Geoffrey Gurtner; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..We believe that understanding age related defects in stem cell trafficking will be important for the design of rational therapeutics to prevent and treat vascular aging. ..