J J Gross

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Misery is not miserly: sad and self-focused individuals spend more
    Cynthia E Cryder
    Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
    Psychol Sci 19:525-30. 2008
  2. ncbi request reprint Healthy and unhealthy emotion regulation: personality processes, individual differences, and life span development
    Oliver P John
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 1650, USA
    J Pers 72:1301-33. 2004
  3. ncbi request reprint How to bite your tongue without blowing your top: implicit evaluation of emotion regulation predicts affective responding to anger provocation
    Iris B Mauss
    Department of Psychology, University of Denver, Denver, CO 80208, USA
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 32:589-602. 2006
  4. ncbi request reprint Individual differences in cognitive reappraisal: experiential and physiological responses to an anger provocation
    Iris B Mauss
    Department of Psychology, University of Denver, 2155 South Race Street, Denver, CO 80208, USA
    Int J Psychophysiol 66:116-24. 2007
  5. ncbi request reprint Cardiovascular, electrodermal, and respiratory response patterns to fear- and sadness-inducing films
    Sylvia D Kreibig
    Department of Psychology, Swiss Center for Affective Sciences, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
    Psychophysiology 44:787-806. 2007
  6. ncbi request reprint Hiding feelings: the acute effects of inhibiting negative and positive emotion
    J J Gross
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, California 94305 2130, USA
    J Abnorm Psychol 106:95-103. 1997
  7. ncbi request reprint Revealing feelings: facets of emotional expressivity in self-reports, peer ratings, and behavior
    J J Gross
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, California 94305 2130, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 72:435-48. 1997
  8. ncbi request reprint Emotion and aging: experience, expression, and control
    J J Gross
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, California 94305 2130, USA
    Psychol Aging 12:590-9. 1997
  9. ncbi request reprint Mapping the domain of expressivity: multimethod evidence for a hierarchical model
    J J Gross
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 2130, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 74:170-91. 1998
  10. ncbi request reprint Antecedent- and response-focused emotion regulation: divergent consequences for experience, expression, and physiology
    J J Gross
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 2130, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 74:224-37. 1998

Research Grants

Detail Information

Publications61

  1. doi request reprint Misery is not miserly: sad and self-focused individuals spend more
    Cynthia E Cryder
    Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
    Psychol Sci 19:525-30. 2008
    ..For example, economic theories of spending may benefit from incorporating psychological theories -- specifically, theories of emotion and the self -- into their models...
  2. ncbi request reprint Healthy and unhealthy emotion regulation: personality processes, individual differences, and life span development
    Oliver P John
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 1650, USA
    J Pers 72:1301-33. 2004
    ..e., increases in the use of reappraisal and decreases in the use of suppression)...
  3. ncbi request reprint How to bite your tongue without blowing your top: implicit evaluation of emotion regulation predicts affective responding to anger provocation
    Iris B Mauss
    Department of Psychology, University of Denver, Denver, CO 80208, USA
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 32:589-602. 2006
    ..These findings suggest that implicit positive evaluation of emotion regulation is associated with successful, automatic, and physiologically adaptive down-regulation of anger...
  4. ncbi request reprint Individual differences in cognitive reappraisal: experiential and physiological responses to an anger provocation
    Iris B Mauss
    Department of Psychology, University of Denver, 2155 South Race Street, Denver, CO 80208, USA
    Int J Psychophysiol 66:116-24. 2007
    ..These findings suggest that reappraisers are successful at down-regulating negative emotions, even in the context of a potent negative emotion such as anger...
  5. ncbi request reprint Cardiovascular, electrodermal, and respiratory response patterns to fear- and sadness-inducing films
    Sylvia D Kreibig
    Department of Psychology, Swiss Center for Affective Sciences, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
    Psychophysiology 44:787-806. 2007
    ..Findings are discussed in terms of the fight-flight and conservation-withdrawal responses and possible limitations of a valence-arousal categorization of emotion in affective space...
  6. ncbi request reprint Hiding feelings: the acute effects of inhibiting negative and positive emotion
    J J Gross
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, California 94305 2130, USA
    J Abnorm Psychol 106:95-103. 1997
    ..On the basis of these findings, we suggest several ways emotional inhibition may influence psychological functioning...
  7. ncbi request reprint Revealing feelings: facets of emotional expressivity in self-reports, peer ratings, and behavior
    J J Gross
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, California 94305 2130, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 72:435-48. 1997
    ..These studies demonstrate the importance of a multifaceted approach to emotional expressivity and have implications for the understanding of personality and emotion...
  8. ncbi request reprint Emotion and aging: experience, expression, and control
    J J Gross
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, California 94305 2130, USA
    Psychol Aging 12:590-9. 1997
    ..Results are interpreted in terms of increasingly competent emotion regulation across the life span...
  9. ncbi request reprint Mapping the domain of expressivity: multimethod evidence for a hierarchical model
    J J Gross
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 2130, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 74:170-91. 1998
    ..These findings support a hierarchical model of individual differences in emotional expressivity...
  10. ncbi request reprint Antecedent- and response-focused emotion regulation: divergent consequences for experience, expression, and physiology
    J J Gross
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 2130, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 74:224-37. 1998
    ..However, reappraisal decreased disgust experience, whereas suppression increased sympathetic activation. These results suggest that these 2 emotion regulatory processes may have different adaptive consequences...
  11. ncbi request reprint Individual differences in two emotion regulation processes: implications for affect, relationships, and well-being
    James J Gross
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, California 94305 2130, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 85:348-62. 2003
    ..Study 5 shows that using reappraisal is related positively to well-being, whereas using suppression is related negatively...
  12. ncbi request reprint Emotion regulation: affective, cognitive, and social consequences
    James J Gross
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, California 94305 2130, USA
    Psychophysiology 39:281-91. 2002
    ..Suppression also increases physiological responding for suppressors and their social partners. This review concludes with a consideration of five important directions for future research on emotion regulation processes...
  13. doi request reprint The neural bases of distraction and reappraisal
    Kateri McRae
    Stanford University, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 22:248-62. 2010
    ..Taken together, these data suggest that distraction and reappraisal differentially engage neural systems involved in attentional deployment and cognitive reframing and have different emotional consequences...
  14. pmc Bottom-up and top-down processes in emotion generation: common and distinct neural mechanisms
    Kevin N Ochsner
    Department of Psychology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA
    Psychol Sci 20:1322-31. 2009
    ..These findings provide a neural foundation for emotion theories that posit multiple kinds of appraisal processes and help to clarify mechanisms underlying clinically relevant forms of emotion dysregulation...
  15. ncbi request reprint The social consequences of expressive suppression
    Emily A Butler
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, California 94305 2130, USA
    Emotion 3:48-67. 2003
    ..In Study 2, suppression had a negative impact on the regulators' emotional experience and increased blood pressure in both regulators and their partners. Suppression also reduced rapport and inhibited relationship formation...
  16. pmc The experience of emotion
    Lisa Feldman Barrett
    Department of Psychology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02467, USA
    Annu Rev Psychol 58:373-403. 2007
    ..We then discuss the role of such experiences in the economy of the mind and behavior...
  17. ncbi request reprint For better or for worse: neural systems supporting the cognitive down- and up-regulation of negative emotion
    Kevin N Ochsner
    Department of Psychology, Columbia University, 369 Schermerhorn Hall, New York, NY 10027, USA
    Neuroimage 23:483-99. 2004
    ....
  18. doi request reprint The social costs of emotional suppression: a prospective study of the transition to college
    Sanjay Srivastava
    Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 1227, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 96:883-97. 2009
    ....
  19. pmc Self-representation in social anxiety disorder: linguistic analysis of autobiographical narratives
    Barrett Anderson
    San Jose State University, Department of Psychology, Dudley Moorehead Hall 157, One Washington Square, San Jose, CA 95192, USA
    Behav Res Ther 46:1119-25. 2008
    ..These findings support cognitive models of SAD, and suggest that autobiographical memory of social situations in SAD may influence current and future thinking, emotion, and behavioral avoidance...
  20. ncbi request reprint Sadness and amusement reactivity differentially predict concurrent and prospective functioning in major depressive disorder
    Jonathan Rottenberg
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, California 94305 2130, USA
    Emotion 2:135-46. 2002
    ..Loss of the context-appropriate modulation of emotion in depression may reflect a core feature of emotion dysregulation in this disorder...
  21. ncbi request reprint Emotion regulation and memory: the cognitive costs of keeping one's cool
    J M Richards
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 79:410-24. 2000
    ..Together, these studies suggest that the cognitive costs of keeping one's cool may vary according to how this is done...
  22. ncbi request reprint Attention and emotion: does rating emotion alter neural responses to amusing and sad films?
    C A Hutcherson
    Department of Psychology, Jordan Hall, Building 420, Stanford, CA 94305 2130, USA
    Neuroimage 27:656-68. 2005
    ....
  23. pmc The neural bases of emotion regulation: reappraisal and suppression of negative emotion
    Philippe R Goldin
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 63:577-86. 2008
    ....
  24. doi request reprint All in the mind's eye? Anger rumination and reappraisal
    Rebecca D Ray
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, CA 94305, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 94:133-45. 2008
    ..These findings provide compelling new evidence that how one thinks about an emotional event can shape the emotional response one has...
  25. ncbi request reprint Signaling threat: how situational cues affect women in math, science, and engineering settings
    Mary C Murphy
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Jordan Hall, Bldg 420, 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Psychol Sci 18:879-85. 2007
    ..Men were unaffected by this situational cue. The implications for understanding vulnerability to social identity threat, particularly among women in MSE settings, are discussed...
  26. doi request reprint The up- and down-regulation of amusement: experiential, behavioral, and autonomic consequences
    Nicole R Giuliani
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Emotion 8:714-9. 2008
    ..This finding is a critical extension of the growing literature on the voluntary regulation of emotion, and has the potential to help us better understand how people use humor in the service of coping and social goals...
  27. doi request reprint Loving-kindness meditation increases social connectedness
    Cendri A Hutcherson
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 2130, USA
    Emotion 8:720-4. 2008
    ..These results suggest that this easily implemented technique may help to increase positive social emotions and decrease social isolation...
  28. pmc Individual differences in typical reappraisal use predict amygdala and prefrontal responses
    Emily M Drabant
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 65:367-73. 2009
    ..Such spontaneous emotion regulation might play an important role in normal and pathological responses to the emotional challenges of everyday life...
  29. doi request reprint Neural bases of social anxiety disorder: emotional reactivity and cognitive regulation during social and physical threat
    Philippe R Goldin
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 2130, USA
    Arch Gen Psychiatry 66:170-80. 2009
    ....
  30. pmc Anterior cingulate cortex volume and emotion regulation: is bigger better?
    Nicole R Giuliani
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Biol Psychol 86:379-82. 2011
    ..Expressive suppression, negative affect, and age were not related to dACC volume. These findings indicate that individual differences in cognitive reappraisal are related to individual differences in dACC volume in healthy participants...
  31. pmc Experiential, autonomic, and neural responses during threat anticipation vary as a function of threat intensity and neuroticism
    Emily M Drabant
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroimage 55:401-10. 2011
    ....
  32. pmc For better or worse? Stress inoculation effects for implicit but not explicit anxiety
    Michael D Edge
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Depress Anxiety 26:831-7. 2009
    ..low) ELS is associated with greater self-reported anxiety. This study tested the hypothesis that stress inoculation effects are evident for implicit (nonconscious) but not explicit (conscious) aspects of anxiety...
  33. doi request reprint Effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) on emotion regulation in social anxiety disorder
    Philippe R Goldin
    Department of Psychology, Jordan Hall, Building 420, Stanford, CA 94305 2130, USA
    Emotion 10:83-91. 2010
    ..These changes might facilitate reduction in SAD-related avoidance behaviors, clinical symptoms, and automatic emotional reactivity to negative self-beliefs in adults with SAD...
  34. ncbi request reprint Harnessing the need for immediate gratification: cognitive reconstrual modulates the reward value of temptations
    Eran Magen
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Emotion 7:415-28. 2007
    ..These studies demonstrate that cognitive reconstrual can be used to modify reward contingencies, so that succumbing to temptation becomes less appealing, and resisting temptation becomes more appealing...
  35. ncbi request reprint Individual differences in trait rumination and the neural systems supporting cognitive reappraisal
    Rebecca D Ray
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Building 420, Stanford, CA 94305 2130, USA
    Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci 5:156-68. 2005
    ..These findings clarify relations between rumination and emotion regulation processes and may have important implications for mood and anxiety disorders...
  36. pmc Neural mechanisms of cognitive reappraisal of negative self-beliefs in social anxiety disorder
    Philippe R Goldin
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 2130, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 66:1091-9. 2009
    ..Despite its relevance, little is known about the neural bases and temporal features of cognitive reappraisal in patients with SAD...
  37. ncbi request reprint Optimism in close relationships: How seeing things in a positive light makes them so
    Sanjay Srivastava
    Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 1227, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 91:143-53. 2006
    ..In a 1-year follow-up, men's optimism predicted relationship status. Effects of optimism were mediated by the optimists' perceived support, which appears to promote a variety of beneficial processes in romantic relationships...
  38. ncbi request reprint The tie that binds? Coherence among emotion experience, behavior, and physiology
    Iris B Mauss
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 2130, USA
    Emotion 5:175-90. 2005
    ..These findings provide new evidence about response system coherence in emotions...
  39. ncbi request reprint The neural bases of amusement and sadness: a comparison of block contrast and subject-specific emotion intensity regression approaches
    Philippe R Goldin
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 2130, USA
    Neuroimage 27:26-36. 2005
    ....
  40. ncbi request reprint The cognitive control of emotion
    Kevin N Ochsner
    Department of Psychology, Columbia University, Schermerhorn Hall, 1190 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, NY 10027, USA
    Trends Cogn Sci 9:242-9. 2005
    ..Taken together, the results suggest a functional architecture for the cognitive control of emotion that dovetails with findings from other human and nonhuman research on emotion...
  41. ncbi request reprint Emotion regulation and culture: are the social consequences of emotion suppression culture-specific?
    Emily A Butler
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Emotion 7:30-48. 2007
    ..These findings suggest that many of suppression's negative social impacts may be moderated by cultural values...
  42. pmc Interdependent self-construal and neural representations of self and mother
    Rebecca D Ray
    Vanderbilt University, Department of Psychology, 204 Wilson Hall, Nashville, TN 37204, USA
    Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci 5:318-23. 2010
    ..This suggests that those with greater interdependent self-construals may rely more upon episodic memory, reflected appraisals, or theory of mind to incorporate social information to make judgments about themselves...
  43. ncbi request reprint Rethinking feelings: an FMRI study of the cognitive regulation of emotion
    Kevin N Ochsner
    Stanford University, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 14:1215-29. 2002
    ..These findings support the hypothesis that prefrontal cortex is involved in constructing reappraisal strategies that can modulate activity in multiple emotion-processing systems...
  44. ncbi request reprint Social anxiety and response to touch: incongruence between self-evaluative and physiological reactions
    F H Wilhelm
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Biol Psychol 58:181-202. 2001
    ....
  45. doi request reprint Hedonic and instrumental motives in anger regulation
    Maya Tamir
    Department of Psychology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, USA
    Psychol Sci 19:324-8. 2008
    ..These findings support a functional view of emotion regulation, and demonstrate that in certain contexts, individuals may choose to experience emotions that are instrumental, despite short-term hedonic costs...
  46. ncbi request reprint Same situation--different emotions: how appraisals shape our emotions
    Matthias Siemer
    Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33124, USA
    Emotion 7:592-600. 2007
    ..Together, these findings suggest that appraisals may be necessary and sufficient to determine different emotional reactions toward a particular situation...
  47. doi request reprint Cognitive reappraisal of negative affect: converging evidence from EMG and self-report
    Rebecca D Ray
    Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37203, USA
    Emotion 10:587-92. 2010
    ....
  48. pmc Attention and emotion influence the relationship between extraversion and neural response
    C A Hutcherson
    Stanford University, CA, USA
    Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci 3:71-9. 2008
    ..These findings suggest that attentional focus does not influence the relationship between extraversion and neural response to positive (amusing) stimuli but does impact the response to negative (sad) stimuli...
  49. ncbi request reprint Implicit theories of emotion: affective and social outcomes across a major life transition
    Maya Tamir
    Department of Psychology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 92:731-44. 2007
    ..Together, these studies demonstrate that implicit theories of emotion can have important long-term implications for socioemotional functioning...
  50. pmc Healthy young women with serotonin transporter SS polymorphism show a pro-inflammatory bias under resting and stress conditions
    Carolyn A Fredericks
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Brain Behav Immun 24:350-7. 2010
    ....
  51. ncbi request reprint Crying threshold and intensity in major depressive disorder
    Jonathan Rottenberg
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, California 94305 2130, USA
    J Abnorm Psychol 111:302-12. 2002
    ..The lack of emotional activation among clinically depressed participants who cried provides a tantalizing clue concerning how emotions are dysregulated in this disorder...
  52. ncbi request reprint Business or pleasure? Utilitarian versus hedonic considerations in emotion regulation
    Maya Tamir
    Department of Psychology, Boston College, 140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chesnut Hill, MA 02467, USA
    Emotion 7:546-54. 2007
    ..excitement) before the task. These findings demonstrate that utilitarian considerations play an important, if underappreciated, role in emotion regulation...
  53. ncbi request reprint Depression and emotional reactivity: variation among Asian Americans of East Asian descent and European Americans
    Yulia E Chentsova-Dutton
    Department of Psychology, Colby College, Waterville, Maine, USA
    J Abnorm Psychol 116:776-85. 2007
    ..Thus, although depression may influence particular aspects of emotional reactivity across cultures (e.g., crying), the specific direction of this influence may depend on prevailing cultural norms regarding emotional expression...
  54. ncbi request reprint Vagal withdrawal to a sad film predicts subsequent recovery from depression
    Jonathan Rottenberg
    Department of Psychology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 7200, USA
    Psychophysiology 42:277-81. 2005
    ..Depressed persons who exhibited a higher degree of vagal withdrawal to the sad film were more likely to recover from depression. Implications for the study of RSA in depression are discussed...
  55. ncbi request reprint Autonomic recovery and habituation in social anxiety
    Iris B Mauss
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 2130, USA
    Psychophysiology 40:648-53. 2003
    ..These results suggest minimal autonomic differences between HTSA and LTSA individuals, thus supporting theories of social anxiety that emphasize cognitive factors...
  56. ncbi request reprint Emotion context insensitivity in major depressive disorder
    Jonathan Rottenberg
    Department of Psychology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 7200, USA
    J Abnorm Psychol 114:627-39. 2005
    ..Overall, data provide partial support for the positive attenuation and ECI views. Depression may produce mood-state-dependent changes in emotional reactivity that are most pronounced in emotion experience reports...
  57. ncbi request reprint Respiratory sinus arrhythmia, emotion, and emotion regulation during social interaction
    Emily A Butler
    Family Studies and Human Development, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 0033, USA
    Psychophysiology 43:612-22. 2006
    ..Women with higher resting RSA experienced and expressed more negative emotion, and women who attempted to regulate their emotions either by suppressing or reappraising showed larger increases in RSA than controls...
  58. ncbi request reprint Implicit anxiety measure predicts cardiovascular reactivity to an evaluated speaking task
    Boris Egloff
    Department of Psychology, Johannes Gutenberg Universitat Mainz, Germany
    Emotion 2:3-11. 2002
    ..These findings encourage the broader use of implicit measures to assess cardiovascular responses to threat...
  59. ncbi request reprint Expressive suppression during an acoustic startle
    Tim Hagemann
    Department of Organizational Psychology, University of Dortmund, 44227 Dortmund, Germany
    Psychophysiology 43:104-12. 2006
    ..Results indicated that startle suppression increased sympathetic activation. These findings extend prior work on emotion suppression, and suggest that inhibiting other biologically based responses also may be physiologically taxing...
  60. ncbi request reprint Mechanisms of virtual reality exposure therapy: the role of the behavioral activation and behavioral inhibition systems
    Frank H Wilhelm
    Institute for Psychology, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland
    Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback 30:271-84. 2005
    ..Results are discussed within the framework of E. B. Foa & M. J. Kozak's (1986) emotional processing theory of fear modification, suggesting different mechanisms underlying VR and in-vivo exposure treatments...
  61. ncbi request reprint Does repressive coping promote resilience? Affective-autonomic response discrepancy during bereavement
    Karin G Coifman
    Department of Counseling and Clinical Psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 92:745-58. 2007
    ..Results are discussed in terms of recent developments in cognitive and neuroimaging research suggesting that repressive coping may serve a protective function...

Research Grants1

  1. Neural Mechanisms Underlying MBSR in Socially Phobic Individuals
    James Gross; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Aim 3 investigates whether MBSR-related changes in attentional emotion regulation mediate MBSR treatment response (decreases in anxiety and increases in well-being) at post-treatment and at the 3-month follow-up. ..