Kalanit Grill-Spector

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint The neural basis of object perception
    Kalanit Grill-Spector
    Department of Psychology, Jordan Hall Building 420, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 13:159-66. 2003
  2. ncbi request reprint The fusiform face area subserves face perception, not generic within-category identification
    Kalanit Grill-Spector
    Department of Psychology, Jordan Hall, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Neurosci 7:555-62. 2004
  3. ncbi request reprint Visual recognition: as soon as you know it is there, you know what it is
    Kalanit Grill-Spector
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, CA, USA
    Psychol Sci 16:152-60. 2005
  4. pmc Developmental neuroimaging of the human ventral visual cortex
    Kalanit Grill-Spector
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Trends Cogn Sci 12:152-62. 2008
  5. ncbi request reprint Repetition and the brain: neural models of stimulus-specific effects
    Kalanit Grill-Spector
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Trends Cogn Sci 10:14-23. 2006
  6. ncbi request reprint High-resolution imaging reveals highly selective nonface clusters in the fusiform face area
    Kalanit Grill-Spector
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, 94305, USA
    Nat Neurosci 9:1177-85. 2006
  7. pmc fMRI-adaptation and category selectivity in human ventral temporal cortex: regional differences across time scales
    Kevin S Weiner
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94306, USA
    J Neurophysiol 103:3349-65. 2010
  8. doi request reprint Representation of shapes, edges, and surfaces across multiple cues in the human visual cortex
    Joakim Vinberg
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Neurophysiol 99:1380-93. 2008
  9. pmc Electrical stimulation of human fusiform face-selective regions distorts face perception
    Josef Parvizi
    Laboratory of Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology, Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 1348 Louvain, Belgium
    J Neurosci 32:14915-20. 2012
  10. ncbi request reprint Object-selective cortex exhibits performance-independent repetition suppression
    Rory Sayres
    Neurosciences Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Neurophysiol 95:995-1007. 2006

Research Grants

  1. Development of Face Perception and Recognition
    Kalanit Grill Spector; Fiscal Year: 2007
  2. Fine-scale organization of human object-selective cortex
    Kalanit Grill Spector; Fiscal Year: 2006

Detail Information

Publications27

  1. ncbi request reprint The neural basis of object perception
    Kalanit Grill-Spector
    Department of Psychology, Jordan Hall Building 420, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Curr Opin Neurobiol 13:159-66. 2003
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint The fusiform face area subserves face perception, not generic within-category identification
    Kalanit Grill-Spector
    Department of Psychology, Jordan Hall, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Neurosci 7:555-62. 2004
    ..These results indicate that the FFA is involved in both detection and identification of faces, but that it has little involvement in within-category identification of non-face objects (including objects of expertise)...
  3. ncbi request reprint Visual recognition: as soon as you know it is there, you know what it is
    Kalanit Grill-Spector
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, CA, USA
    Psychol Sci 16:152-60. 2005
    ..These findings place powerful constraints on theories of object recognition...
  4. pmc Developmental neuroimaging of the human ventral visual cortex
    Kalanit Grill-Spector
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Trends Cogn Sci 12:152-62. 2008
    ..These results have important implications regarding the role of experience in shaping the ventral stream and the nature of the underlying representations...
  5. ncbi request reprint Repetition and the brain: neural models of stimulus-specific effects
    Kalanit Grill-Spector
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Trends Cogn Sci 10:14-23. 2006
    ..We also discuss future directions for distinguishing between these models, which will be important for understanding the neural consequences of repetition and for interpreting repetition-related effects in neuroimaging data...
  6. ncbi request reprint High-resolution imaging reveals highly selective nonface clusters in the fusiform face area
    Kalanit Grill-Spector
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, 94305, USA
    Nat Neurosci 9:1177-85. 2006
    ..These results suggest that visual processing in this region is not exclusive to faces. Overall, our approach provides a framework for understanding the fine-scale structure of neural representations in the human brain...
  7. pmc fMRI-adaptation and category selectivity in human ventral temporal cortex: regional differences across time scales
    Kevin S Weiner
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94306, USA
    J Neurophysiol 103:3349-65. 2010
    ....
  8. doi request reprint Representation of shapes, edges, and surfaces across multiple cues in the human visual cortex
    Joakim Vinberg
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Neurophysiol 99:1380-93. 2008
    ..Overall, these data suggest that integration of visual information across multiple cues is mainly achieved at the level of shape and underscore LOC's role in shape computations...
  9. pmc Electrical stimulation of human fusiform face-selective regions distorts face perception
    Josef Parvizi
    Laboratory of Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology, Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 1348 Louvain, Belgium
    J Neurosci 32:14915-20. 2012
    ..Overall, our findings reveal a striking convergence of fMRI, ECoG, and EBS, which together offer a rare causal link between functional subsets of the human FG network and face perception...
  10. ncbi request reprint Object-selective cortex exhibits performance-independent repetition suppression
    Rory Sayres
    Neurosciences Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Neurophysiol 95:995-1007. 2006
    ..We found significant RS for brief presentations (albeit with a reduced magnitude), which again persisted when controlling for performance. This suggests a substantial amount of RS occurs during recognition...
  11. pmc Relating retinotopic and object-selective responses in human lateral occipital cortex
    Rory Sayres
    Neurosciences Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Neurophysiol 100:249-67. 2008
    ..Overall these results demonstrate that retinal position exhibits strong effects on neural response in LO and indicates that these position effects may be explained by retinotopic organization...
  12. ncbi request reprint The human visual cortex
    Kalanit Grill-Spector
    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 2130, USA
    Annu Rev Neurosci 27:649-77. 2004
    ..Here we review recent findings and methods employed to uncover the functional properties of the human visual cortex focusing on two themes: functional specialization and hierarchical processing...
  13. pmc Not one extrastriate body area: using anatomical landmarks, hMT+, and visual field maps to parcellate limb-selective activations in human lateral occipitotemporal cortex
    Kevin S Weiner
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroimage 56:2183-99. 2011
    ..Instead, multiple properties are necessary in order to parcellate and understand the functional organization of high-level visual cortex...
  14. pmc The fusiform face area is enlarged in Williams syndrome
    Golijeh Golarai
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Neurosci 30:6700-12. 2010
    ..Thus, a larger FFA may play a role in face recognition proficiency among WS...
  15. pmc Differential development of high-level visual cortex correlates with category-specific recognition memory
    Golijeh Golarai
    Department of Psychology, Jordan Hall Bldg 420, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 2130, USA
    Nat Neurosci 10:512-22. 2007
    ....
  16. pmc Global similarity and pattern separation in the human medial temporal lobe predict subsequent memory
    Karen F Larocque
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Neurosci 33:5466-74. 2013
    ..These data provide novel evidence that complementary MTL encoding computations subserve declarative memory...
  17. pmc Neural representations of faces and limbs neighbor in human high-level visual cortex: evidence for a new organization principle
    Kevin S Weiner
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Psychol Res 77:74-97. 2013
    ..We conclude with a new model of high-level visual cortex consisting of ventral, lateral, and dorsal components, where multimodal processing related to vision, action, haptics, and language converges in the lateral pathway...
  18. doi request reprint The improbable simplicity of the fusiform face area
    Kevin S Weiner
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Trends Cogn Sci 16:251-4. 2012
    ..We suggest a series of constraints to aid researchers when defining any functionally specialized region with a pleasing realization: anatomy matters...
  19. pmc Face-likeness and image variability drive responses in human face-selective ventral regions
    Nicolas Davidenko
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Hum Brain Mapp 33:2334-49. 2012
    ..This indicates that controlling variability across conditions should be a critical tool in future neuroimaging studies of face and object representation...
  20. doi request reprint Deos the bairn not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe?
    Kalanit Grill-Spector
    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuron 62:161-2. 2009
    ..find higher sensitivity to changes in real words than pseudowords in the left visual word form area (VWFA). Here we discuss the implications of their findings and the constraints they impose on neural coding in the lVWFA...
  21. ncbi request reprint The representation of object viewpoint in human visual cortex
    David R Andresen
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroimage 45:522-36. 2009
    ..Overall, our findings underscore the utility of parametric approaches for studying the neural basis of object invariance and suggest that there is no complete invariance to object view in the human ventral stream...
  22. doi request reprint The mid-fusiform sulcus: a landmark identifying both cytoarchitectonic and functional divisions of human ventral temporal cortex
    Kevin S Weiner
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA Electronic address
    Neuroimage 84:453-65. 2014
    ....
  23. pmc White matter microstructure on diffusion tensor imaging is associated with conventional magnetic resonance imaging findings and cognitive function in adolescents born preterm
    Heidi M Feldman
    Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Dev Med Child Neurol 54:809-14. 2012
    ....
  24. pmc Sparsely-distributed organization of face and limb activations in human ventral temporal cortex
    Kevin S Weiner
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroimage 52:1559-73. 2010
    ..Consequently, theories of object recognition should consider the functional and spatial constraints of neural coding across a series of minimally overlapping category-selective clusters that are themselves distributed...
  25. ncbi request reprint Selectivity of adaptation in single units: implications for FMRI experiments
    Kalanit Grill-Spector
    Department of Psychology and Neuroscience Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Neuron 49:170-1. 2006
    ..Sawamura and colleagues provide a critical stepping-stone by elucidating the relation between neural adaptation and response selectivity. They find some cross-adaptation by two different stimuli that activate the same neuron...
  26. doi request reprint Synchrony upon repetition: One or multiple neural mechanisms?
    Kevin S Weiner
    a Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, USA
    Cogn Neurosci 3:243-4. 2012
    ..While synchrony is an appealing new model, we suggest that further constraints are necessary to account for qualitatively different types of RS and priming yet to be considered by the present implementation. ..
  27. pmc Differential development of the ventral visual cortex extends through adolescence
    Golijeh Golarai
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University Stanford, CA, USA
    Front Hum Neurosci 3:80. 2010
    ..These findings have important implications for theories of development and functional specialization in VTC...

Research Grants2

  1. Development of Face Perception and Recognition
    Kalanit Grill Spector; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ....
  2. Fine-scale organization of human object-selective cortex
    Kalanit Grill Spector; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..Results of these experiments will provide critical constraints on any theory of object recognition. ..