Edward E Graves

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Hypoxia in models of lung cancer: implications for targeted therapeutics
    Edward E Graves
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, California 94305 5847, USA
    Clin Cancer Res 16:4843-52. 2010
  2. doi request reprint Quantitative and qualitative analysis of [(18)F]FDG and [(18)F]FAZA positron emission tomography of head and neck cancers and associations with HPV status and treatment outcome
    Edward E Graves
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, 269 Campus Dr, CCSR South Rm 1255A, Stanford, CA, 94305 5152, USA
    Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 43:617-25. 2016
  3. ncbi request reprint Targeted therapies and hypoxia imaging
    R Ali
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Q J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 57:283-95. 2013
  4. ncbi request reprint Design and evaluation of a variable aperture collimator for conformal radiotherapy of small animals using a microCT scanner
    Edward E Graves
    Department of Radiology Oncology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Med Phys 34:4359-67. 2007
  5. ncbi request reprint Imaging tumoral hypoxia: oxygen concentrations and beyond
    Edward E Graves
    Radiation Oncology Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5847, USA
    Oncology (Williston Park) 21:368-76; discussion 377-8, 384. 2007
  6. ncbi request reprint RT_Image: an open-source tool for investigating PET in radiation oncology
    Edward E Graves
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Technol Cancer Res Treat 6:111-21. 2007
  7. ncbi request reprint Validation of in vivo fluorochrome concentrations measured using fluorescence molecular tomography
    Edward E Graves
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Biomed Opt 10:44019. 2005
  8. doi request reprint Metabolic imaging metrics correlate with survival in early stage lung cancer treated with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy
    Jonathan A Abelson
    Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Lung Cancer 78:219-24. 2012
  9. pmc Prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume and velocity in predicting head-and-neck cancer outcomes
    Karen P Chu
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA, USA
    Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 83:1521-7. 2012
  10. pmc Metabolic tumor volume is an independent prognostic factor in patients treated definitively for non-small-cell lung cancer
    Percy Lee
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, CA, USA
    Clin Lung Cancer 13:52-8. 2012

Detail Information

Publications36

  1. pmc Hypoxia in models of lung cancer: implications for targeted therapeutics
    Edward E Graves
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, California 94305 5847, USA
    Clin Cancer Res 16:4843-52. 2010
    ....
  2. doi request reprint Quantitative and qualitative analysis of [(18)F]FDG and [(18)F]FAZA positron emission tomography of head and neck cancers and associations with HPV status and treatment outcome
    Edward E Graves
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, 269 Campus Dr, CCSR South Rm 1255A, Stanford, CA, 94305 5152, USA
    Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 43:617-25. 2016
    ..In this study, we analyzed hypoxia PET images of head and neck cancer patients and compared imaging metrics with human papilloma virus (HPV) status and clinical outcome...
  3. ncbi request reprint Targeted therapies and hypoxia imaging
    R Ali
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Q J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 57:283-95. 2013
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Design and evaluation of a variable aperture collimator for conformal radiotherapy of small animals using a microCT scanner
    Edward E Graves
    Department of Radiology Oncology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Med Phys 34:4359-67. 2007
    ..This variable aperture collimator technology is therefore a feasible and flexible solution for adjustable shaping of radiation beams for use in small animal radiotherapy as well as other applications in which beam shaping is desired...
  5. ncbi request reprint Imaging tumoral hypoxia: oxygen concentrations and beyond
    Edward E Graves
    Radiation Oncology Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5847, USA
    Oncology (Williston Park) 21:368-76; discussion 377-8, 384. 2007
    ..Finally, we will evaluate the clinical potential of oxygen- and molecular-specific techniques for imaging hypoxia, and discuss how these methods will individually and collectively advance oncology...
  6. ncbi request reprint RT_Image: an open-source tool for investigating PET in radiation oncology
    Edward E Graves
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Technol Cancer Res Treat 6:111-21. 2007
    ..The development of tools such as this is critical in order to realize the potential of molecular imaging-guided radiation therapy...
  7. ncbi request reprint Validation of in vivo fluorochrome concentrations measured using fluorescence molecular tomography
    Edward E Graves
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Biomed Opt 10:44019. 2005
    ..These findings demonstrate the in vivo quantitative accuracy of fluorescence tomography, and encourage further development of this imaging modality as well as application of FMT in molecular imaging studies using fluorescent reporters...
  8. doi request reprint Metabolic imaging metrics correlate with survival in early stage lung cancer treated with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy
    Jonathan A Abelson
    Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Lung Cancer 78:219-24. 2012
    ....
  9. pmc Prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume and velocity in predicting head-and-neck cancer outcomes
    Karen P Chu
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA, USA
    Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 83:1521-7. 2012
    ..We hypothesized that increases in MTV over time would correlate with tumor growth and biology, and would predict outcome. We sought to examine tumor growth over time in serial pretreatment PET-CT scans...
  10. pmc Metabolic tumor volume is an independent prognostic factor in patients treated definitively for non-small-cell lung cancer
    Percy Lee
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, CA, USA
    Clin Lung Cancer 13:52-8. 2012
    ..We evaluated the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume (MTV), a measure of tumor burden on FDG-PET imaging, in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated definitively...
  11. pmc Kilovoltage beam Monte Carlo dose calculations in submillimeter voxels for small animal radiotherapy
    Magdalena Bazalova
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Med Phys 36:4991-9. 2009
    ..The aim of this paper is to efficiently calculate the dose delivered using our microRT system based on a microCT scanner with the Monte Carlo (MC) method and to compare the MC calculations to film measurements...
  12. pmc Postradiation metabolic tumor volume predicts outcome in head-and-neck cancer
    James D Murphy
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 80:514-21. 2011
    ..To explore the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume measured on postradiation (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in patients with head-and-neck cancer...
  13. ncbi request reprint Tumor volume as a potential imaging-based risk-stratification factor in trimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer
    Margaret M Kozak
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5847, USA
    J Thorac Oncol 6:920-6. 2011
    ....
  14. pmc Validation that metabolic tumor volume predicts outcome in head-and-neck cancer
    Chad Tang
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 83:1514-20. 2012
    ....
  15. pmc Interim-treatment quantitative PET parameters predict progression and death among patients with Hodgkin's disease
    Diane Tseng
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 875 Blake Wilbur Dr, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Radiat Oncol 7:5. 2012
    ..We hypothesized that quantitative PET parameters may have predictive value beyond that of traditional clinical factors such as the International Prognostic Score (IPS) among Hodgkin's disease (HD) patients...
  16. ncbi request reprint Oxygen sensitivity of reporter genes: implications for preclinical imaging of tumor hypoxia
    Ivana Cecic
    Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Imaging Program, Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5847, USA
    Mol Imaging 6:219-28. 2007
    ..These results demonstrate that combining beta-galactosidase with the DDAOG optical probe may be a robust reporter system for the in vivo study of tumor hypoxia...
  17. doi request reprint Metabolic tumor volume predicts disease progression and survival in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal
    Jose G Bazan
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5847, USA
    J Nucl Med 54:27-32. 2013
    ..PET imaging has become a useful diagnostic tool in patients with anal cancer. We evaluated the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume (MTV) in patients with anal cancer treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy...
  18. pmc Prognostic PET 18F-FDG uptake imaging features are associated with major oncogenomic alterations in patients with resected non-small cell lung cancer
    Viswam S Nair
    Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Cancer Res 72:3725-34. 2012
    ..Together, our findings suggest that leveraging tumor genomics with an expanded collection of PET-FDG imaging features may enhance our understanding of FDG uptake as an imaging biomarker beyond its association with glycolysis...
  19. pmc The role of tumor cell-derived connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) in pancreatic tumor growth
    Kevin L Bennewith
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Cancer Res 69:775-84. 2009
    ....
  20. pmc Metabolic tumor volume predicts for recurrence and death in head-and-neck cancer
    Trang H La
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 74:1335-41. 2009
    ....
  21. ncbi request reprint A bone composition model for Monte Carlo x-ray transport simulations
    Hu Zhou
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Med Phys 36:1008-18. 2009
    ....
  22. pmc Development of a micro-computed tomography-based image-guided conformal radiotherapy system for small animals
    Hu Zhou
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5847, USA
    Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 78:297-305. 2010
    ....
  23. pmc Investigation of the effects of treatment planning variables in small animal radiotherapy dose distributions
    Amy R Motomura
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Med Phys 37:590-9. 2010
    ....
  24. ncbi request reprint Metabolic tumor burden predicts for disease progression and death in lung cancer
    Percy Lee
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5847, USA
    Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 69:328-33. 2007
    ..However, stage may be simply a surrogate for underlying tumor burden. Our purpose was to assess the prognostic value of tumor burden measured by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging...
  25. doi request reprint Outcomes of Modestly Hypofractionated Radiation for Lung Tumors: Pre- and Mid-Treatment Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography Metrics as Prognostic Factors
    Jeremy P Harris
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
    Clin Lung Cancer 16:475-85. 2015
    ..We also report an exploratory analysis of the prognostic value of the pre- and mid-RT positron emission tomography-computed tomography...
  26. pmc Correlation between metabolic tumor volume and pathologic tumor volume in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity
    James D Murphy
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, United States
    Radiother Oncol 101:356-61. 2011
    ..To explore the relationship between pathologic tumor volume and volume estimated from different tumor segmentation techniques on (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in oral cavity cancer...
  27. pmc The importance of tissue segmentation for dose calculations for kilovoltage radiation therapy
    Magdalena Bazalova
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 USA
    Med Phys 38:3039-49. 2011
    ..The feasibility of tissue segmentation routinely done on the basis of differences in tissue mass densities was studied and a new segmentation scheme based on differences in effective atomic numbers was developed...
  28. pmc The tumor microenvironment in non-small-cell lung cancer
    Edward E Graves
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
    Semin Radiat Oncol 20:156-63. 2010
    ..Presently, there are several promising modalities to image hypoxia and the tumor vasculature; these include dynamic perfusion imaging and positron emission tomography scanning with radiolabled nitroimidazoles...
  29. pmc Modality comparison for small animal radiotherapy: a simulation study
    Magdalena Bazalova
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305
    Med Phys 41:011710. 2014
    ..The goal of this paper is to investigate dose distributions for three small animal radiation treatment modalities...
  30. pmc Cost-effectiveness landscape analysis of treatments addressing xerostomia in patients receiving head and neck radiation therapy
    Laura S Sasportas
    Department of Bioengineering, Biodesign Innovation Program, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol 116:e37-51. 2013
    ..We conclude that intensity-modulated radiation therapy is both the most widely used prevention approach and the most cost-effective existing solution and we highlight novel and promising techniques on the cost-effectiveness landscape...
  31. pmc Recruitment of circulating breast cancer cells is stimulated by radiotherapy
    Marta Vilalta
    Division of Radiation and Cancer Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Cell Rep 8:402-9. 2014
    ..Our work provides a mechanism for tumor recurrence in which RT attracts cells outside the radiation field to migrate to the site of treatment...
  32. pmc Targeting GLUT1 and the Warburg effect in renal cell carcinoma by chemical synthetic lethality
    Denise A Chan
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Sci Transl Med 3:94ra70. 2011
    ..Our results show that the Warburg effect confers distinct characteristics on tumor cells that can be selectively targeted for therapy...
  33. doi request reprint 18F-EF5 PET Is Predictive of Response to Fractionated Radiotherapy in Preclinical Tumor Models
    Rehan Ali
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 10:e0139425. 2015
    ..However, increasing the number of fractions delivered abrogates the difference in response between tumors with high and low EF5 uptake pre-treatment, in agreement with traditional radiobiology. ..
  34. pmc The potential of positron emission tomography for intratreatment dynamic lung tumor tracking: a phantom study
    Jaewon Yang
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305
    Med Phys 41:021718. 2014
    ..The authors propose a center of mass (CoM) tumor tracking algorithm using gated-PET images combined with a respiratory monitor and investigate the geometric accuracy of the proposed algorithm...
  35. ncbi request reprint Metabolic imaging of low-grade gliomas with three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopy
    Andrea Pirzkall
    Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 53:1254-64. 2002
    ..We performed a study examining the impact MRSI would have on the routine addition of 2-3-cm margins around MRI T2-weighted hyperintensity to generate the treatment planning clinical target volume (CTV) for low-grade gliomas...
  36. ncbi request reprint In vivo tomographic imaging of near-infrared fluorescent probes
    Vasilis Ntziachristos
    Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Bldg 149 13th Street 5406, Charlestown, MA 02129 2060, USA
    Mol Imaging 1:82-8. 2002
    ..This validation of FMT with FRI demonstrated the spatial congruence of fluorochrome activation as determined by the two techniques...