Deborah M Gordon

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc The regulation of ant colony foraging activity without spatial information
    Balaji Prabhakar
    Departments of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS Comput Biol 8:e1002670. 2012
  2. pmc The ecology of collective behavior
    Deborah M Gordon
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 12:e1001805. 2014
  3. pmc Does an ecological advantage produce the asymmetric lineage ratio in a harvester ant population?
    Deborah M Gordon
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305 5020, USA
    Oecologia 173:849-57. 2013
  4. pmc Harvester ant colony variation in foraging activity and response to humidity
    Deborah M Gordon
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e63363. 2013
  5. doi The rewards of restraint in the collective regulation of foraging by harvester ant colonies
    Deborah M Gordon
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5020, USA
    Nature 498:91-3. 2013
  6. pmc The dynamics of foraging trails in the tropical arboreal ant Cephalotes goniodontus
    Deborah M Gordon
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e50472. 2012
  7. doi Plant defense, herbivory, and the growth of Cordia alliodora trees and their symbiotic Azteca ant colonies
    Elizabeth G Pringle
    Biology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Oecologia 170:677-85. 2012
  8. pmc Water stress strengthens mutualism among ants, trees, and scale insects
    Elizabeth G Pringle
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America Michigan Society of Fellows, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 11:e1001705. 2013
  9. pmc The devil to pay: a cost of mutualism with Myrmelachista schumanni ants in 'devil's gardens' is increased herbivory on Duroia hirsuta trees
    Megan E Frederickson
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5020, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 274:1117-23. 2007
  10. ncbi Brood production and lineage discrimination in the red harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex barbatus)
    Veronica P Volny
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5020, USA
    Ecology 87:2194-200. 2006

Detail Information

Publications28

  1. pmc The regulation of ant colony foraging activity without spatial information
    Balaji Prabhakar
    Departments of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS Comput Biol 8:e1002670. 2012
    ..Our simple stochastic model shows how the regulation of ant colony foraging can operate without spatial information, describing a process at the level of individual ants that predicts the overall foraging activity of the colony...
  2. pmc The ecology of collective behavior
    Deborah M Gordon
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 12:e1001805. 2014
    ..Examples from ants provide a starting point for examining more generally the fit between the particular pattern of interaction that regulates activity, and the environment in which it functions. ..
  3. pmc Does an ecological advantage produce the asymmetric lineage ratio in a harvester ant population?
    Deborah M Gordon
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305 5020, USA
    Oecologia 173:849-57. 2013
    ..Our results show no ecological advantage for either lineage, indicating that differences between the lineages in sex ratio allocation may be sufficient to maintain the current asymmetry of the lineage ratio in this population...
  4. pmc Harvester ant colony variation in foraging activity and response to humidity
    Deborah M Gordon
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e63363. 2013
    ..We found that the effect of returning foragers on the rate of outgoing foragers increases with humidity. There are consistent differences among colonies in foraging activity that persist from year to year...
  5. doi The rewards of restraint in the collective regulation of foraging by harvester ant colonies
    Deborah M Gordon
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5020, USA
    Nature 498:91-3. 2013
    ..These results indicate that natural selection is shaping the collective behaviour that regulates foraging activity, and that the selection pressure, related to climate, may grow stronger if the current drought in their habitat persists...
  6. pmc The dynamics of foraging trails in the tropical arboreal ant Cephalotes goniodontus
    Deborah M Gordon
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e50472. 2012
    ..This suggests that the allocation of foragers to different trails is regulated by interactions at the nest...
  7. doi Plant defense, herbivory, and the growth of Cordia alliodora trees and their symbiotic Azteca ant colonies
    Elizabeth G Pringle
    Biology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Oecologia 170:677-85. 2012
    ..These results suggest that in this system the tree can decrease herbivory by promoting ant-colony growth, i.e., sustaining space and food investment in ants, as long as the tree continues to grow...
  8. pmc Water stress strengthens mutualism among ants, trees, and scale insects
    Elizabeth G Pringle
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America Michigan Society of Fellows, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 11:e1001705. 2013
    ..Thus, water limitation, together with the risk of herbivory, increases the strength of a carbon-based mutualism. ..
  9. pmc The devil to pay: a cost of mutualism with Myrmelachista schumanni ants in 'devil's gardens' is increased herbivory on Duroia hirsuta trees
    Megan E Frederickson
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5020, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 274:1117-23. 2007
    ..We suggest that high herbivory may limit the spread of devil's gardens, possibly explaining why devil's gardens do not overrun Amazonian rainforests...
  10. ncbi Brood production and lineage discrimination in the red harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex barbatus)
    Veronica P Volny
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5020, USA
    Ecology 87:2194-200. 2006
    ..Queens could use male cuticular hydrocarbons as cues to assess the lineage of males at the mating aggregation, and possibly keep mating until they have mated with males of both lineages...
  11. doi Effects of vegetation cover, presence of a native ant species, and human disturbance on colonization by Argentine ants
    Katherine Fitzgerald
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, 371 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 5020, USA
    Conserv Biol 26:525-38. 2012
    ..Interactions among the variables we examined were associated with low probabilities of Argentine ant colonization in the preserve...
  12. ncbi The intertwined population biology of two Amazonian myrmecophytes and their symbiotic ants
    Megan E Frederickson
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5020, USA
    Ecology 90:1595-607. 2009
    ..Positive feedback between ants and plants allowed a few plants and ant colonies to become very large; these probably produced the majority of offspring in the next generation...
  13. doi How patrollers set foraging direction in harvester ants
    Michael J Greene
    Department of Biology, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, P O Box 173364, Campus Box 171, Denver, Colorado 80211, USA
    Am Nat 170:943-8. 2007
    ..Thus, the colony's 30-50 patrollers act as gatekeepers for thousands of foragers and choose a foraging direction, but they do not recruit and lead foragers all the way to a food source...
  14. ncbi Male parentage in dependent-lineage populations of the harvester ant Pogonomyrmex barbatus
    Sevan S Suni
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5020, USA
    Mol Ecol 16:5149-55. 2007
    ..26, which is sufficiently high for workers to police those that attempt to reproduce...
  15. doi Hydrocarbons on harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex barbatus) middens guide foragers to the nest
    Shelby J Sturgis
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5020, USA
    J Chem Ecol 37:514-24. 2011
    ..The chemical environment of the nest mound contributes to the regulation of foraging behavior in harvester ants...
  16. pmc The effect of individual variation on the structure and function of interaction networks in harvester ants
    Noa Pinter-Wollman
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J R Soc Interface 8:1562-73. 2011
    ..Individual variation in connectivity, arising from variation among ants in location and spatial behaviour, creates interaction centres, which may expedite information flow...
  17. ncbi Indirect benefits of symbiotic coccoids for an ant-defended myrmecophytic tree
    Elizabeth G Pringle
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Ecology 92:37-46. 2011
    ..These results suggest that higher investment by trees in coccoids leads to more effective defense by ants against the tree's foliar herbivores...
  18. doi Diversification and phylogeographic structure in widespread Azteca plant-ants from the northern Neotropics
    Elizabeth G Pringle
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Ecol 21:3576-92. 2012
    ..Differences in population structure between the ants and their host trees may profoundly affect the evolutionary dynamics of this widespread ant-plant mutualism...
  19. ncbi Rainfall facilitates the spread, and time alters the impact, of the invasive Argentine ant
    Nicole E Heller
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Oecologia 155:385-95. 2008
    ..Instead, native ant species richness in invaded areas increased significantly over the 13 years of observation. This suggests that the impact of Argentine ants on naïve ant communities may be most severe early in the invasion process...
  20. ncbi Task-specific expression of the foraging gene in harvester ants
    Krista K Ingram
    Department of Biological Sciences, 371 Serra Mall, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Ecol 14:813-8. 2005
    ..The association between foraging behaviour and the foraging gene is conserved across social insects but ants and bees have an inverse relationship between foraging expression and behaviour...
  21. pmc Chemical defense by the native winter ant (Prenolepis imparis) against the invasive Argentine ant (Linepithema humile)
    Trevor R Sorrells
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e18717. 2011
    ..imparis workers showed that the nonpolar fraction is derived from the Dufour's gland. Based on these conclusions, we hypothesize that this chemical defense may help P. imparis to resist displacement by L. humile...
  22. ncbi Ecology: 'Devil's gardens' bedevilled by ants
    Megan E Frederickson
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5020, USA
    Nature 437:495-6. 2005
    ..By killing these other plants, M. schumanni provides its colonies with abundant nest sites--a long-lasting benefit as colonies can live for 800 years...
  23. ncbi Social insects: Cuticular hydrocarbons inform task decisions
    Michael J Greene
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nature 423:32. 2003
  24. doi Colony life history and lifetime reproductive success of red harvester ant colonies
    Krista K Ingram
    Department of Biology, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY, 13346, USA
    J Anim Ecol 82:540-50. 2013
    ..This is the starting point for future investigation asking whether variation in reproductive success is related to phenotypic variation among colonies in behavioural and ecological traits...
  25. pmc Genetic basis for queen-worker dimorphism in a social insect
    Veronica P Volny
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99:6108-11. 2002
    ..This mode of caste determination has important consequences for the evolution of multiple mating by females and for control of the sex ratio and reproductive allocation in social insect colonies...
  26. pmc Fast and flexible: argentine ants recruit from nearby trails
    Tatiana P Flanagan
    Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e70888. 2013
    ..Recruiting ants from nearby persistent trails creates a dynamic circuit, like those found in other distributed systems, which facilitates a quick response to changes in available resources. ..
  27. ncbi Genetic caste determination in harvester ants: possible origin and maintenance by cyto-nuclear epistasis
    Timothy A Linksvayer
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA
    Ecology 87:2185-93. 2006
    ..Finally, we propose experiments and observations that might help resolve the origin and maintenance of this unusual system of caste determination...
  28. ncbi Control without hierarchy
    Deborah M Gordon
    Department of Biological Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5020, USA
    Nature 446:143. 2007