Stuart B Goodman

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Local infusion of FGF-2 enhances bone ingrowth in rabbit chambers in the presence of polyethylene particles
    Stuart B Goodman
    Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, R144, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, California 94305 5341, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 65:454-61. 2003
  2. pmc Controlled release of growth factors on allograft bone in vitro
    Zhinong Huang
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Edwards Building R116, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Clin Orthop Relat Res 466:1905-11. 2008
  3. pmc High complication rate in revision total hip arthroplasty in juvenile idiopathic arthritis
    Stuart B Goodman
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center Outpatient Center, 450 Broadway Street, M C 6342, Redwood City, CA, 94063, USA
    Clin Orthop Relat Res 472:637-44. 2014
  4. pmc The future of biologic coatings for orthopaedic implants
    Stuart B Goodman
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Biomaterials 34:3174-83. 2013
  5. pmc CORR insights: do patients lose weight after joint arthroplasty surgery? A systematic review
    Stuart B Goodman
    Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Room 144, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Clin Orthop Relat Res 471:299-300. 2013
  6. pmc What questions do patients undergoing lower extremity joint replacement surgery have?
    Alex Macario
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    BMC Health Serv Res 3:11. 2003
  7. pmc Cellular chemotaxis induced by wear particles from joint replacements
    Stuart B Goodman
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, United States
    Biomaterials 31:5045-50. 2010
  8. doi request reprint Allograft alternatives: bone substitutes and beyond
    Stuart B Goodman
    Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Orthopedics 33:661. 2010
  9. pmc Wear particles, periprosthetic osteolysis and the immune system
    Stuart B Goodman
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, R153 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5326, USA
    Biomaterials 28:5044-8. 2007
  10. ncbi request reprint Effects of orthopaedic wear particles on osteoprogenitor cells
    Stuart B Goodman
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, R144, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5326, USA
    Biomaterials 27:6096-101. 2006

Detail Information

Publications118 found, 100 shown here

  1. ncbi request reprint Local infusion of FGF-2 enhances bone ingrowth in rabbit chambers in the presence of polyethylene particles
    Stuart B Goodman
    Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, R144, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, California 94305 5341, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 65:454-61. 2003
    ..g., in treating early osteolytic lesions), and facilitating osseointegration of revision total joint replacements in situations where the bone bed is suboptimal and residual particles and granulomatous tissue are present...
  2. pmc Controlled release of growth factors on allograft bone in vitro
    Zhinong Huang
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Edwards Building R116, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Clin Orthop Relat Res 466:1905-11. 2008
    ..Addition of OP-1 increased bone formation whereas FGF-2 decreased bone formation. Local delivery of growth factors over a prolonged period modulated the differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells on allograft bone...
  3. pmc High complication rate in revision total hip arthroplasty in juvenile idiopathic arthritis
    Stuart B Goodman
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center Outpatient Center, 450 Broadway Street, M C 6342, Redwood City, CA, 94063, USA
    Clin Orthop Relat Res 472:637-44. 2014
    ..The intermediate- to long-term results of these surgeries remain unknown...
  4. pmc The future of biologic coatings for orthopaedic implants
    Stuart B Goodman
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Biomaterials 34:3174-83. 2013
    ....
  5. pmc CORR insights: do patients lose weight after joint arthroplasty surgery? A systematic review
    Stuart B Goodman
    Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Room 144, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Clin Orthop Relat Res 471:299-300. 2013
    ..1007/s11999-012-2537-7 ...
  6. pmc What questions do patients undergoing lower extremity joint replacement surgery have?
    Alex Macario
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    BMC Health Serv Res 3:11. 2003
    ..This study's goal was to have patients consulting an orthopedic surgeon about undergoing either a total hip arthroplasty (THA) or a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) rate the importance of different questions concerning their care...
  7. pmc Cellular chemotaxis induced by wear particles from joint replacements
    Stuart B Goodman
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, United States
    Biomaterials 31:5045-50. 2010
    ..Modulation of the chemokine ligand-receptor axis is a potential strategy to mitigate the adverse effects of wear particles from joint replacements...
  8. doi request reprint Allograft alternatives: bone substitutes and beyond
    Stuart B Goodman
    Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Orthopedics 33:661. 2010
    ..Future basic and clinical research will define the indications and outcomes for new combination products for reconstruction of lost bone associated with revision total joint replacement...
  9. pmc Wear particles, periprosthetic osteolysis and the immune system
    Stuart B Goodman
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, R153 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5326, USA
    Biomaterials 28:5044-8. 2007
    ..These findings are worrisome, given the fact that increasing numbers of metal-on-metal joint implants are being implanted in younger more active individuals worldwide...
  10. ncbi request reprint Effects of orthopaedic wear particles on osteoprogenitor cells
    Stuart B Goodman
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, R144, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5326, USA
    Biomaterials 27:6096-101. 2006
    ..Future studies should delineate the molecular mechanisms by which particles adversely affect mesenchymal stems cells and the bone cell lineage and provide strategies to modulate these effects...
  11. ncbi request reprint Temporal effects of a COX-2-selective NSAID on bone ingrowth
    Stuart B Goodman
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305 5341, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 72:279-87. 2005
    ..This suggests that the effects of COX-2 inhibitors on bone are less profound when the drug is administered for a short period of time...
  12. ncbi request reprint Revision total hip arthroplasty in juvenile chronic arthritis: 17 revisions in 11 patients followed for 4-12 years
    Stuart B Goodman
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine Stanford, California, USA
    Acta Orthop 77:242-50. 2006
    ..We report the complications and outcome of a prospective series of 17 revision THAs in Charnley class C JCA patients...
  13. ncbi request reprint COX-2 selective inhibitors and bone
    S B Goodman
    Dept Orthopaedic Surgery and Div Immunol Rheumatol, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol 16:201-5. 2003
    ..Furthermore, whether COX-2 inhibitors and non-selective NSAIDs lead to clinically relevant adverse effects on bone healing in humans is unknown...
  14. ncbi request reprint Biocompatibility of total joint replacements: A review
    Stuart B Goodman
    The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5326, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 90:603-18. 2009
    ..A clear understanding of these important issues will facilitate the development of novel strategies to improve the longevity and function of implants for joint replacement in the future...
  15. ncbi request reprint Polymethylmethacrylate particle exposure causes changes in p38 MAPK and TGF-beta signaling in differentiating MC3T3-E1 cells
    Gene K Ma
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 94:234-40. 2010
    ..This study has demonstrated the distinct changes in the molecular profile of MC3T3-E1 cells during particle-induced inhibition of osteoblast differentiation. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res, 2010...
  16. ncbi request reprint COX-2 selective NSAID decreases bone ingrowth in vivo
    Stuart Goodman
    Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, R144, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Orthop Res 20:1164-9. 2002
    ..COX-2 inhibitors currently taken for arthritis and other conditions may potentially delay fracture healing and bone ingrowth...
  17. ncbi request reprint Modulation of bone ingrowth and tissue differentiation by local infusion of interleukin-10 in the presence of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) wear particles
    Stuart Goodman
    Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 65:43-50. 2003
    ..Local infusion of immune-modulating cytokines such as IL-10 may prove to be useful in abating particle-induced periprosthetic osteolysis...
  18. ncbi request reprint Wear particulate and osteolysis
    Stuart Goodman
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Orthop Clin North Am 36:41-8, vi. 2005
    ..Debris from several materials in sufficient quantities and physicochemical forms, however, can generate an inflammatory cascade resulting in periprosthetic bone destruction (osteolysis), jeopardizing long-term success of the implant...
  19. ncbi request reprint Effects of a p38 MAP kinase inhibitor on bone ingrowth and tissue differentiation in rabbit chambers
    S B Goodman
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 81:310-6. 2007
    ..Additional experiments are needed to establish the efficacy of p38 MAPK inhibitor administration on mitigating an established inflammatory and foreign body reaction that parallels the clinical situation more closely...
  20. ncbi request reprint UHMWPE wear debris upregulates mononuclear cell proinflammatory gene expression in a novel murine model of intramedullary particle disease
    Noah J Epstein
    Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Acta Orthop 76:412-20. 2005
    ....
  21. pmc Local effect of IL-4 delivery on polyethylene particle induced osteolysis in the murine calvarium
    Allison J Rao
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Orthopaedic Research Laboratories, Stanford University School of Medicine, Edwards R116, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 101:1926-34. 2013
    ..IL-4 delivery mitigated PE particle-induced osteolysis through macrophage polarization. Modulation of macrophage polarization is a potential treatment strategy for wear particle induced periprosthetic osteolysis...
  22. pmc Exogenous MC3T3 preosteoblasts migrate systemically and mitigate the adverse effects of wear particles
    Kate Fritton
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Tissue Eng Part A 18:2559-67. 2012
    ....
  23. pmc Effect of a CCR1 receptor antagonist on systemic trafficking of MSCs and polyethylene particle-associated bone loss
    Emmanuel Gibon
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Redwood City, CA 94063, USA
    Biomaterials 33:3632-8. 2012
    ..CCR1 appears to be a critical receptor for chemotaxis of MSCs in the presence of UHMWPE particles. Interference with CCR1 exacerbates particle-induced bone loss...
  24. pmc In vivo murine model of continuous intramedullary infusion of particles--a preliminary study
    Ting Ma
    The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 88:250-3. 2009
    ..This model demonstrated that continuous infusion of particles to the murine bone-implant interface is possible. In vivo biological processes associated using wear debris particles can be studied using this new animal model...
  25. doi request reprint Polymethylmethacrylate particles impair osteoprogenitor viability and expression of osteogenic transcription factors Runx2, osterix, and Dlx5
    Richard Chiu
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Edwards Building, R 116, Stanford, California 94305 5341, USA
    J Orthop Res 28:571-7. 2010
    ..These results indicate that PMMA particles impair osteoprogenitor viability and inhibit the expression of transcription factors that promote osteoprogenitor differentiation...
  26. pmc Continuous infusion of UHMWPE particles induces increased bone macrophages and osteolysis
    Pei Gen Ren
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Clin Orthop Relat Res 469:113-22. 2011
    ..Whether the monocyte/macrophages found at the implant interface in the presence of polyethylene particles are locally or systemically derived is unknown...
  27. ncbi request reprint Periprosthetic osteolysis: induction of vascular endothelial growth factor from human monocyte/macrophages by orthopaedic biomaterial particles
    Keita Miyanishi
    Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5341, USA
    J Bone Miner Res 18:1573-83. 2003
    ..Increased levels of angiogenic factors, such as VEGF, may be critically important in wear debris-induced implant loosening after total joint arthroplasty...
  28. pmc Stem cell attraction via SDF-1α expressing fat tissue grafts
    Stefan Zwingenberger
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 101:2067-74. 2013
    ..Thus, SDF-1α activated tissue grafts may be a strategy to enhance site-specific musculoskeletal tissue regeneration...
  29. doi request reprint Molecular profile of osteoprogenitor cells seeded on allograft bone
    Kierann E Smith
    Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University, CA, USA
    J Tissue Eng Regen Med 5:704-11. 2011
    ..Specific bone-related genes and proteins were expressed in a time-dependent manner when osteoprogenitor cells were cultured on cortico-cancellous bone discs in vitro...
  30. doi request reprint New bone formation by murine osteoprogenitor cells cultured on corticocancellous allograft bone
    Ehren R Nelson
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery R153, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, California 94305 5326, USA
    J Orthop Res 26:1660-4. 2008
    ..This model allows for the investigation of the effects of multiple growth factors, and other interventions, on OPCs seeded onto allograft bone in vitro...
  31. doi request reprint Modulating osteogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells by modifying growth factor availability
    Zhinong Huang
    Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, Edwards Building R116, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, United States
    Cytokine 51:305-10. 2010
    ..Selective, temporally specific addition of growth factors, such as BMP-2 and VEGF appears to be an important strategy to enhance osteogenesis...
  32. ncbi request reprint Ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene wear debris inhibits osteoprogenitor proliferation and differentiation in vitro
    Richard Chiu
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 89:242-7. 2009
    ..150% v/v. This study demonstrated that UHMWPE particles inhibit the osteogenic activity of osteoprogenitor cells, which may result in reduced periprosthetic bone regeneration and repair...
  33. pmc Selective inhibition of the MCP-1-CCR2 ligand-receptor axis decreases systemic trafficking of macrophages in the presence of UHMWPE particles
    Emmanuel Gibon
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Orthop Res 30:547-53. 2012
    ..Interruption of the MCP-1 ligand-receptor axis appears to be a viable strategy to mitigate trafficking of macrophages and osteolysis due to UHMWPE particles...
  34. ncbi request reprint Kinetics of polymethylmethacrylate particle-induced inhibition of osteoprogenitor differentiation and proliferation
    Richard Chiu
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, 800 Welch Road, Room 354, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Orthop Res 25:450-7. 2007
    ..This study has shown that the early phase of osteoprogenitor differentiation is a crucial time period during which exposure to PMMA particles causes irreversible inhibition of osteogenesis...
  35. ncbi request reprint Proinflammatory mediator expression in a novel murine model of titanium-particle-induced intramedullary inflammation
    Bryan A Warme
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, California, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 71:360-6. 2004
    ....
  36. ncbi request reprint Effects of tensile strain and fluid flow on osteoarthritic human chondrocyte metabolism in vitro
    Taro Mawatari
    Orthopaedic Research Laboratories, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, R105, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Orthop Res 28:907-13. 2010
    ..Although the articular chondrocytes reacted to the mechanically applied stress, it was notable that there was a differential effect of tensile strain and fluid flow on anabolic and catabolic markers...
  37. pmc Surveillance of systemic trafficking of macrophages induced by UHMWPE particles in nude mice by noninvasive imaging
    Pei Gen Ren
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 94:706-11. 2010
    ..Interference with systemic macrophage trafficking may potentially mitigate UHMWPE particle-induced periprosthetic osteolysis...
  38. ncbi request reprint Dose- and time-dependent effects of cyclic hydrostatic pressure on transforming growth factor-beta3-induced chondrogenesis by adult human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro
    Keita Miyanishi
    Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5341, USA
    Tissue Eng 12:2253-62. 2006
    ..The data suggest that tissue engineering of articular cartilage through application or recruitment of hMSCs can be facilitated by mechanical stimulation...
  39. pmc Effects of orthopedic polymer particles on chemotaxis of macrophages and mesenchymal stem cells
    Zhinong Huang
    Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 94:1264-9. 2010
    ..This effect seems to be dependent on the particle type, and may be modulated by MCP-1 and MIP-1alpha, however, more than one chemokine may be necessary for chemotaxis...
  40. ncbi request reprint Interleukin 1 receptor antagonist inhibits localized bone formation in vivo
    Ting Ma
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5341, USA
    J Rheumatol 30:2547-52. 2003
    ..To test the in vivo effects of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) on bone formation and tissue ingrowth using an implantable bone ingrowth chamber that can be infused with test solutions...
  41. ncbi request reprint Polymethylmethacrylate particles inhibit osteoblastic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 osteoprogenitor cells
    Richard Chiu
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Edwards Building, R 116, Stanford, California 94305 5341, USA
    J Orthop Res 26:932-6. 2008
    ..These results indicate that direct exposure of MC3T3-E1 osteoprogenitors to PMMA particles results in suppression of osteogenic proliferation and differentiation...
  42. pmc Recommendations and considerations for the use of biologics in orthopedic surgery
    Stefan Zwingenberger
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA, USA
    BioDrugs 26:245-56. 2012
    ..The present report examines the composition, biological properties, indications, clinical experience and regulations of several of the biotherapeutics employed for bone reconstruction...
  43. ncbi request reprint Interleukin-1 modulates periprosthetic tissue formation in an intramedullary model of particle-induced inflammation
    Noah J Epstein
    Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5341, USA
    J Orthop Res 23:501-10. 2005
    ..We hypothesized that the absence of the IL-1 type-1 receptor would mitigate the inflammatory response to titanium particles and decrease periprosthetic inflammatory tissue in a murine intramedullary rod model...
  44. pmc Role of the Toll-like receptor pathway in the recognition of orthopedic implant wear-debris particles
    Jeremy I Pearl
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, 450 Broadway Street, M C 6342, Redwood City, CA 94063, USA
    Biomaterials 32:5535-42. 2011
    ..These results indicate that the response to PMMA particles is partly dependent on MyD88, presumably as part of TLR signaling; MyD88 may represent a therapeutic target for prevention of wear debris-induced periprosthetic osteolysis...
  45. ncbi request reprint Effects of interleukin-10 on titanium particle-induced macrophage transcription factor activation and cytokine expression in vitro
    Neal Wong
    Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, R144, Stanford, California 94305 5341, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 69:40-6. 2004
    ..These data show that antiinflammatory cytokines may provide a mechanism by which particle-induced inflammatory response may be modulated in vivo...
  46. ncbi request reprint Intermittent hydrostatic pressure inhibits matrix metalloproteinase and pro-inflammatory mediator release from human osteoarthritic chondrocytes in vitro
    Michael C D Trindade
    Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5341, USA
    Osteoarthritis Cartilage 12:729-35. 2004
    ..This study tested the hypothesis that intermittent hydrostatic pressure applied to human osteoarthritic chondrocytes modulates matrix metalloproteinase and pro-inflammatory mediator release in vitro...
  47. ncbi request reprint Effect of nanofiber-coated surfaces on the proliferation and differentiation of osteoprogenitors in vitro
    Zhinong Huang
    Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Tissue Eng Part A 14:1853-9. 2008
    ..Thus, surface modification using nanofibers of various materials can alter the attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells in vitro...
  48. pmc Direct subcutaneous injection of polyethylene particles over the murine calvaria results in dramatic osteolysis
    Allison J Rao
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Orthopaedic Research Laboratories, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Int Orthop 37:1393-8. 2013
    ..We evaluated a minimally invasive modification of the calvarial model by using a direct subcutaneous injection of PE particles...
  49. pmc Enhancement of BMP-2 induced bone regeneration by SDF-1α mediated stem cell recruitment
    Stefan Zwingenberger
    1 Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California
    Tissue Eng Part A 20:810-8. 2014
    ..This study demonstrated that SDF-1α enhanced BMP-2 mediated bone healing in a critical size segmental bone defect model. Notably, both proteins alone also provided a cumulative effect on MSC attraction toward the site of injury...
  50. pmc Role of direct estrogen receptor signaling in wear particle-induced osteolysis
    Christophe Nich
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Biomaterials 34:641-50. 2013
    ..These results indicate that the response to wear particles involves estrogen receptors in female mice, as part of macrophage activation. Estrogen receptors may be considered as a future therapeutic target for particle-induced osteolysis...
  51. doi request reprint Effects of sclerostin antibody on healing of a non-critical size femoral bone defect
    Muhammad U Jawad
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University, 450 Broadway Street, Mail Code 6342 Redwood City, Stanford, California 94063, USA
    J Orthop Res 31:155-63. 2013
    ..These findings underscore the potential use of Scl-AbIII for treatment of complicated fractures, non-unions, and other clinical scenarios...
  52. pmc Revision joint replacement, wear particles, and macrophage polarization
    Allison J Rao
    Orthopaedic Research Laboratories, Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, CA, USA
    Acta Biomater 8:2815-23. 2012
    ..Wear particles induce a pro-inflammatory microenvironment that facilitates osteolysis; these events may potentially be modulated favorably by exposure to IL-4...
  53. pmc MC3T3-E1 osteoprogenitor cells systemically migrate to a bone defect and enhance bone healing
    Emmanuel Gibon
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94063, USA
    Tissue Eng Part A 18:968-73. 2012
    ..Further, BMD at the defect was significantly increased when cells were injected. Systemic cell therapy using osteoprogenitor cells may be a potential strategy to enhance bone healing...
  54. doi request reprint Continuous intramedullary polymer particle infusion using a murine femoral explant model
    Steven G Ortiz
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 87:440-6. 2008
    ..06 x 10(11) particles per mL (high concentration) UHMWPE for 4 weeks both yielded significantly higher scores for bone loss when compared with controls in which only mouse serum was infused...
  55. ncbi request reprint Polymethylmethacrylate particles inhibit osteoblastic differentiation of bone marrow osteoprogenitor cells
    Richard Chiu
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, California 94305 5341, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 77:850-6. 2006
    ..This study demonstrated that PMMA particles inhibit osteoblastic differentiation of bone marrow osteoprogenitor cells, which may contribute to periprosthetic bone loss and implant failure...
  56. doi request reprint Aseptic versus septic revision total knee arthroplasty: patient satisfaction, outcome and quality of life improvement
    Nilesh Patil
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California, USA
    Knee 17:200-3. 2010
    ..However, in the aseptic group, revision TKA for stiffness was associated with the poorest outcomes. The indication for aseptic revision is an important variable when discussing treatment and outcome with patients...
  57. ncbi request reprint How has the biologic reaction to wear particles changed with newer bearing surfaces?
    Joshua J Jacobs
    Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA
    J Am Acad Orthop Surg 16:S49-55. 2008
    ..Furthermore, optimization of these bearing systems to further diminish wear and corrosion would be highly desirable...
  58. doi request reprint Porous tantalum in hip and knee reconstructive surgery
    Nilesh Patil
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 89:242-51. 2009
    ..This review presents the biomaterial properties and clinical results of porous tantalum devices in hip and knee reconstructive surgeries...
  59. ncbi request reprint Validation and quantification of an in vitro model of continuous infusion of submicron-sized particles
    Steven G Ortiz
    The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 84:328-33. 2008
    ..This in vitro study has quantified the efficiency of a unique particle pumping system that may be used in future in vivo investigations to develop a murine model of continuous particle infusion...
  60. ncbi request reprint Coronal plane stability before and after total knee arthroplasty
    Robert A Siston
    Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Clin Orthop Relat Res 463:43-9. 2007
    ..Our data suggest immediately after implantation knees retain a greater than normal amount of varus-valgus motion, but this motion is more evenly distributed...
  61. doi request reprint OP-1 (BMP-7) stimulates osteoprogenitor cell differentiation in the presence of polymethylmethacrylate particles
    Shawn Kann
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 94:485-8. 2010
    ..Local administration of OP-1 to the site of osteolysis may be a potential adjunctive therapy to reverse the bone destruction due to wear particles...
  62. doi request reprint MI TKA: a risk factor for early revision surgery
    Robert E Mayle
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University, Redwood City, CA 94063, USA
    J Knee Surg 25:423-7. 2012
    ..These data suggest that MI TKA may be a risk factor for early revision...
  63. ncbi request reprint Intraoperative passive kinematics of osteoarthritic knees before and after total knee arthroplasty
    Robert A Siston
    Department of Bioengineering, S 321 James H Clark Center, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5450, USA
    J Orthop Res 24:1607-14. 2006
    ..Posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty does not appear to restore normal passive varus/valgus rotations or the screw motion and introduces an abnormal anterior translation of the femur during intraoperative evaluation...
  64. ncbi request reprint The high variability of tibial rotational alignment in total knee arthroplasty
    Robert A Siston
    Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Clin Orthop Relat Res 452:65-9. 2006
    ..None of the techniques consistently established tibial rotational alignment, and navigation systems that establish rotational alignment by identifying anatomic landmarks were not more reliable than traditional instrumentation...
  65. ncbi request reprint Regulation of nitric oxide and bcl-2 expression by shear stress in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes in vitro
    Mel S Lee
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Cell Biochem 90:80-6. 2003
    ..These data suggest that shear stress induced nitric oxide is associated with changes in apoptotic regulatory factors that alter chondrocyte metabolism and may contribute to joint degeneration...
  66. pmc The basic science of periprosthetic osteolysis
    Stuart B Goodman
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Redwood City, CA, USA
    Instr Course Lect 62:201-6. 2013
    ..Research continues with the hope that viable strategies for preventing and treating particle-induced osteolysis will be introduced in the future, thus mitigating the need for revision surgery...
  67. pmc Identification of a central role for complement in osteoarthritis
    Qian Wang
    Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Centers, Veteran s Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California, USA
    Nat Med 17:1674-9. 2011
    ..Our findings indicate that dysregulation of complement in synovial joints has a key role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis...
  68. pmc Thrombin-activatable carboxypeptidase B cleavage of osteopontin regulates neutrophil survival and synoviocyte binding in rheumatoid arthritis
    Shadi A Sharif
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, CA 94305, USA
    Arthritis Rheum 60:2902-12. 2009
    ..We undertook this study to investigate the roles of OPN-R and OPN-L in synoviocyte adhesion, which contributes to the formation of invasive pannus, and in neutrophil survival, which affects inflammatory infiltrates in RA...
  69. ncbi request reprint Biocompatibility of poly(ethylene glycol)/poly(acrylic acid) interpenetrating polymer network hydrogel particles in RAW 264.7 macrophage and MG-63 osteoblast cell lines
    Eugene S Yim
    Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 91:894-902. 2009
    ..In addition, the MG-63 cell line demonstrated no IL-6 response. Particles of the PEG/PAA IPN thus seem to stimulate biological responses similar to those in other biocompatible materials...
  70. ncbi request reprint Effects of hydrostatic pressure and transforming growth factor-beta 3 on adult human mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenesis in vitro
    Keita Miyanishi
    Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5341, USA
    Tissue Eng 12:1419-28. 2006
    ..This study demonstrated adjunctive effects of IHP on TGF-beta 3-induced chondrogenesis and suggests that mechanical loading can facilitate articular cartilage tissue engineering...
  71. pmc Systemic trafficking of macrophages induced by bone cement particles in nude mice
    Pei Gen Ren
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, R116, Edwards Building, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5326, USA
    Biomaterials 29:4760-5. 2008
    ..Modulation of the signaling mechanisms that regulate systemic macrophage trafficking may provide a new strategy for mitigating the chronic inflammatory response and osteolysis associated with wear debris...
  72. pmc Synovial tissue-infiltrating natural killer cells in osteoarthritis and periprosthetic inflammation
    Ryan S Huss
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Arthritis Rheum 62:3799-805. 2010
    ..The goal of this study was to characterize a newly identified population of synovial tissue-infiltrating natural killer (NK) cells obtained from patients with OA or patients with periprosthetic joint inflammation...
  73. ncbi request reprint Human serum opsonization of orthopedic biomaterial particles: protein-binding and monocyte/macrophage activation in vitro
    Doo Hoon Sun
    Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5341, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 65:290-8. 2003
    ..Alterations in the chemical and surface properties of orthopedic biomaterials to modulate protein interactions may improve implant longevity...
  74. ncbi request reprint What is the outcome of treatment for osteolysis?
    William Maloney
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Am Acad Orthop Surg 16:S26-32. 2008
    ..In general, patient age and activity level, the location and size of the osteolytic defect, and the clinical record of the implant system will dictate treatment choices...
  75. ncbi request reprint Surgical navigation for total knee arthroplasty: a perspective
    Robert A Siston
    Bioengineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Biomech 40:728-35. 2007
    ....
  76. pmc An in vivo murine model of continuous intramedullary infusion of polyethylene particles
    Ting Ma
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Biomaterials 29:3738-42. 2008
    ....
  77. doi request reprint The accuracy of preoperative templating in cementless total hip arthroplasty
    Aasis Unnanuntana
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94035, USA
    J Arthroplasty 24:180-6. 2009
    ..The mean postoperative leg length discrepancy was 0.9 +/- 6.8 mm; 93.5% had a discrepancy within 10 mm...
  78. ncbi request reprint The sequential expression profiles of growth factors from osteoprogenitors [correction of osteroprogenitors] to osteoblasts in vitro
    Zhinong Huang
    Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Tissue Eng 13:2311-20. 2007
    ..Differential expression for grouped sets of growth factors occurs during the temporal acquisition of bone-specific markers as osteoprogenitor cell maturation proceeds in vitro...
  79. ncbi request reprint Evaluation of methods that locate the center of the ankle for computer-assisted total knee arthroplasty
    Robert A Siston
    Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5450, USA
    Clin Orthop Relat Res 439:129-35. 2005
    ..Establishing the midpoint of the most medial and most lateral aspects of the malleoli was an accurate, precise, objective, and fast method for establishing the center of the ankle...
  80. ncbi request reprint Conversion total hip replacement after malunited intertrochanteric fracture: a technical note
    Aasis Unnanuntana
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94035, USA
    Am J Orthop (Belle Mead NJ) 37:506-9. 2008
    ..Therefore, recognizing the anatomical changes before and during surgery is crucial. In this article, we describe specific surgical steps and techniques by which these problems may be avoided, thus minimizing potential complications...
  81. ncbi request reprint Human interleukin-1-induced murine osteoclastogenesis is dependent on RANKL, but independent of TNF-alpha
    Ting Ma
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Edwards Building, R144, Stanford, CA 94305 5341, USA
    Cytokine 26:138-44. 2004
    ..These results show that in the absence of stromal cells, IL-1 exacerbates osteoclastogenesis by cooperating with RANKL and M-CSF, while TNF-alpha is not involved in this IL-1-stimulated osteoclast differentiation pathway...
  82. pmc Plasma carboxypeptidase B downregulates inflammatory responses in autoimmune arthritis
    Jason J Song
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Clin Invest 121:3517-27. 2011
    ..These findings suggest that CPB plays a critical role in dampening local, C5a-mediated inflammation and represents a molecular link between inflammation and coagulation in autoimmune arthritis...
  83. ncbi request reprint Patellar management in revision total knee arthroplasty: is patellar resurfacing a better option?
    Nilesh Patil
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Arthroplasty 25:589-93. 2010
    ..Satisfactory results can be achieved using a variety of methods of patellar management in revision TKA by individualizing the treatment modality depending on the clinical scenario...
  84. pmc Selective tyrosine kinase inhibition by imatinib mesylate for the treatment of autoimmune arthritis
    Ricardo T Paniagua
    Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Clin Invest 116:2633-42. 2006
    ..Imatinib-mediated inhibition of a spectrum of signal transduction pathways and the downstream pathogenic cellular responses may provide a powerful approach to treat RA and other inflammatory diseases...
  85. ncbi request reprint Biodegradable micro-osmotic pump for long-term and controlled release of basic fibroblast growth factor
    WonHyoung Ryu
    Rapid Prototyping Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering Department, 440 Escondido Mall, Bldg 530, Rm 226, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Control Release 124:98-105. 2007
    ..The proposed devices can be further miniaturized and used for the delivery of multiple therapeutic agents at the individual releasing schedules...
  86. pmc New MR imaging methods for metallic implants in the knee: artifact correction and clinical impact
    Christina A Chen
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    J Magn Reson Imaging 33:1121-7. 2011
    ....
  87. ncbi request reprint Deltoid flap combined with fascia lata autograft for rotator cuff defects: a histologic study
    Timothy R McAdams
    Division of Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, 1000 Welch Road, Suite 100, Palo Alto, CA, 94304, USA
    Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc 15:1144-9. 2007
    ..A mutually beneficial relationship may exist when an autogenous fascial graft is combined with a functional deltoid flap for reconstructing large rotator cuff defects...
  88. ncbi request reprint Dissociation of the femoral head and trunion after constrained conversion total hip arthroplasty for poliomyelitis
    Anthony Spinnickie
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Arthroplasty 22:634-7. 2007
    ..All other components were well fixated and properly positioned. The hip was revised successfully with a 40-mm femoral head and a nonconstrained liner with a 15 degrees elevated lip placed posterosuperiorly...
  89. ncbi request reprint Revision total knee arthroplasty using large distal femoral augments for severe metaphyseal bone deficiency: a preliminary study
    Jason R Werle
    Division of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, California 94305, USA
    Orthopedics 25:325-7. 2002
    ..There was no radiographic evidence of loosening, and no implants had been revised at mean 37-month follow-up. This appears to be an acceptable technique based on the intermediate-term results...
  90. doi request reprint Cell therapy for bone regeneration--bench to bedside
    Kevin Lee
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305 5326, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 89:252-63. 2009
    ..Although significant challenges remain, there exists an exceptional opportunity to translate basic research in mesenchymal stem cell technologies into viable clinical treatments for bone regeneration...
  91. ncbi request reprint Current state and future of joint replacements in the hip and knee
    Kevin Lee
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305 5326, USA
    Expert Rev Med Devices 5:383-93. 2008
    ..Long-term studies are needed to establish the efficacy of these new technologies...
  92. doi request reprint Early outcome of a modular femoral component in revision total hip arthroplasty
    Michael N Kang
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Arthroplasty 23:220-5. 2008
    ..Distal intramedullary fit helps ensure initial stability; proximal modularity further maximizes fit while optimizing hip offset and length...
  93. ncbi request reprint The variability of femoral rotational alignment in total knee arthroplasty
    Robert A Siston
    Division of Biomechanical Engineering and the Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5450, USA
    J Bone Joint Surg Am 87:2276-80. 2005
    ..The purposes of the present study were to characterize the variability associated with femoral rotational alignment techniques and to determine whether the use of a computer-assisted surgical navigation system reduced this variability...
  94. ncbi request reprint Total knee replacement in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis
    David E Rojer
    Dept of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center 300 Pasteur Dr, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Orthopedics 28:39-45; quiz 46-7. 2005
    ..Range of motion after TKA for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is usually less than that obtained in osteoarthritis, but still allows for dramatic improvements in performing activities of daily living (Figure 3)...
  95. ncbi request reprint The effects of medications on bone
    Stuart B Goodman
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5326, USA
    J Am Acad Orthop Surg 15:450-60. 2007
    ..Corticosteroids and cancer chemotherapeutic agents generally affect bone adversely and increase fracture risk...
  96. pmc Minimal incision surgery as a risk factor for early failure of total hip arthroplasty
    Bradley P Graw
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, 450 Broadway Street, Pavilion A, Redwood City, CA 94063, USA
    Clin Orthop Relat Res 468:2372-6. 2010
    ..Minimal incision total hip arthroplasty (MI THA) techniques were developed to decrease postoperative pain and recovery time. Although these techniques have increased in popularity, the long-term survivorship of these procedures is unknown...
  97. pmc What experimental approaches (eg, in vivo, in vitro, tissue retrieval) are effective in investigating the biologic effects of particles?
    Mathias Bostrom
    Weill Medical School of Cornell University, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY, USA
    J Am Acad Orthop Surg 16:S63-7. 2008
    ....
  98. ncbi request reprint Seppo Santavirta: the life and work of an orthopaedic surgeon and scientist. A tribute from his friends
    Yrjo T Konttinen
    University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
    J Am Acad Orthop Surg 16:xii-xv. 2008
  99. ncbi request reprint Rebuilding the skeleton: the intraoperative use of trabecular metal in revision total hip arthroplasty
    Allan E Gross
    Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 1X5
    J Arthroplasty 20:91-3. 2005
    ..The initial stability is via the cage, but when graft remodeling takes place, the stress will be taken by the trabecular metal relieving the stress on the cage...
  100. ncbi request reprint What potential biologic treatments are available for osteolysis?
    Edward M Schwarz
    Department of Orthopaedics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA
    J Am Acad Orthop Surg 16:S72-5. 2008
    ..Imaging advancements and an osteolysis registry would significantly enhance the potential for a successful clinical trial...
  101. ncbi request reprint What patient and surgical factors contribute to implant wear and osteolysis in total joint arthroplasty?
    Audrey K Tsao
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA
    J Am Acad Orthop Surg 16:S7-13. 2008
    ..Although these categories are interrelated and not mutually exclusive, they enable us to build a framework in which to further advance our understanding of osteolysis and apply this information in a clinically relevant manner...

Research Grants6

  1. Chemokine Directed Cell Trafficking during Continuous Infusion of Wear Particles
    Stuart B Goodman; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..This research will elucidate important mechanisms of particle-induced, chemokine-directed cell trafficking and suggest new treatment strategies. ..
  2. Infusion of Particles at Implant interfeces
    Stuart Goodman; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..abstract_text> ..
  3. Chemokine Directed Cell Trafficking during Continuous Infusion of Wear Particles
    Stuart Goodman; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..This research will elucidate important mechanisms of particle-induced, chemokine-directed cell trafficking and suggest new treatment strategies. ..
  4. Osteolysis and Implant Wear: Biological, Biomedical Engineering, and Surgical Pri
    Stuart Goodman; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ....
  5. Chemokine Directed Cell Trafficking during Continuous Infusion of Wear Particles
    Stuart Goodman; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..This research will elucidate important mechanisms of particle-induced, chemokine-directed cell trafficking and suggest new treatment strategies. ..