Guri Giaever

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint A chemical genomics approach to understanding drug action
    Guri Giaever
    Stanford Genome Technology Center, 855 California Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
    Trends Pharmacol Sci 24:444-6. 2003
  2. pmc Chemogenomic profiling: identifying the functional interactions of small molecules in yeast
    Guri Giaever
    Stanford Genome Technology Center, 855 California Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94304 1103, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:793-8. 2004
  3. pmc The chemical genomic portrait of yeast: uncovering a phenotype for all genes
    Maureen E Hillenmeyer
    Stanford Genome Technology Center, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
    Science 320:362-5. 2008
  4. doi request reprint Yeast chemical genomics and drug discovery: an update
    Shawn Hoon
    Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94305, USA
    Trends Pharmacol Sci 29:499-504. 2008
  5. doi request reprint An integrated platform of genomic assays reveals small-molecule bioactivities
    Shawn Hoon
    Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Mail Stop 5120, Palo Alto, California 94305, USA
    Nat Chem Biol 4:498-506. 2008
  6. doi request reprint The automated cell: compound and environment screening system (ACCESS) for chemogenomic screening
    Michael Proctor
    Stanford Genome Technology Center, Palo Alto, CA, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 759:239-69. 2011
  7. pmc A universal TagModule collection for parallel genetic analysis of microorganisms
    Julia Oh
    Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94305, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 38:e146. 2010
  8. ncbi request reprint Genome-wide analysis of barcoded Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene-deletion mutants in pooled cultures
    Sarah E Pierce
    Department of Genetics, Stanford Genome Technology Center, 855 S California Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
    Nat Protoc 2:2958-74. 2007
  9. ncbi request reprint Functional profiling of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome
    Guri Giaever
    Stanford Genome Technology Center, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California 94304, USA
    Nature 418:387-91. 2002
  10. pmc Systematic analysis of genome-wide fitness data in yeast reveals novel gene function and drug action
    Maureen E Hillenmeyer
    Biomedical Informatics, 251 Campus Drive, MSOB, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Genome Biol 11:R30. 2010

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications29

  1. ncbi request reprint A chemical genomics approach to understanding drug action
    Guri Giaever
    Stanford Genome Technology Center, 855 California Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
    Trends Pharmacol Sci 24:444-6. 2003
    ..In this article, some of the recent results generated from experiments that exploit the yeast deletion collection to understand mechanisms of drug action are discussed...
  2. pmc Chemogenomic profiling: identifying the functional interactions of small molecules in yeast
    Guri Giaever
    Stanford Genome Technology Center, 855 California Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94304 1103, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:793-8. 2004
    ..The ability to identify on-and-off target effects in vivo is fundamental to understanding the cellular response to small-molecule perturbants...
  3. pmc The chemical genomic portrait of yeast: uncovering a phenotype for all genes
    Maureen E Hillenmeyer
    Stanford Genome Technology Center, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
    Science 320:362-5. 2008
    ..We found that 97% of gene deletions exhibited a measurable growth phenotype, suggesting that nearly all genes are essential for optimal growth in at least one condition...
  4. doi request reprint Yeast chemical genomics and drug discovery: an update
    Shawn Hoon
    Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94305, USA
    Trends Pharmacol Sci 29:499-504. 2008
    ..In this update of an earlier review, we present a snapshot of the current state of chemical genomic approaches in yeast, propose a set of integrated chemical genomic assays to move the field forward and consider its near-term future...
  5. doi request reprint An integrated platform of genomic assays reveals small-molecule bioactivities
    Shawn Hoon
    Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Mail Stop 5120, Palo Alto, California 94305, USA
    Nat Chem Biol 4:498-506. 2008
    ..Finally, we applied this platform to 188 novel synthetic chemical compounds and identified both potential targets and structure-activity relationships...
  6. doi request reprint The automated cell: compound and environment screening system (ACCESS) for chemogenomic screening
    Michael Proctor
    Stanford Genome Technology Center, Palo Alto, CA, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 759:239-69. 2011
    ..The ACCESS system also has a diverse set of software tools to enable users to set up, run, annotate, and evaluate complex screens with minimal training...
  7. pmc A universal TagModule collection for parallel genetic analysis of microorganisms
    Julia Oh
    Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94305, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 38:e146. 2010
    ..The publicly available TagModule collection is a platform-independent resource for the functional genomics of a wide range of microbial systems in the post-genome era...
  8. ncbi request reprint Genome-wide analysis of barcoded Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene-deletion mutants in pooled cultures
    Sarah E Pierce
    Department of Genetics, Stanford Genome Technology Center, 855 S California Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
    Nat Protoc 2:2958-74. 2007
    ....
  9. ncbi request reprint Functional profiling of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome
    Guri Giaever
    Stanford Genome Technology Center, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California 94304, USA
    Nature 418:387-91. 2002
    ..Our results validate the yeast gene-deletion collection as a valuable resource for functional genomics...
  10. pmc Systematic analysis of genome-wide fitness data in yeast reveals novel gene function and drug action
    Maureen E Hillenmeyer
    Biomedical Informatics, 251 Campus Drive, MSOB, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Genome Biol 11:R30. 2010
    ..We developed an algorithm predicting protein targets of chemical compounds and verified its accuracy with experimental testing. Fitness data provide a novel, systems-level perspective on the cell...
  11. ncbi request reprint Systematic screen for human disease genes in yeast
    Lars M Steinmetz
    Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Genet 31:400-4. 2002
    ..To apply these advantages to human disorders involving mitochondria, human orthologs were identified and linked to heritable diseases using genomic map positions...
  12. ncbi request reprint "Chemogenomics: tools for protein families" and "Chemical genomics: chemical and biological integration"
    Corey Nislow
    Stanford Genome Technology Center, 855 California Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
    Pharmacogenomics 4:15-8. 2003
  13. pmc Off-target effects of psychoactive drugs revealed by genome-wide assays in yeast
    Elke Ericson
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    PLoS Genet 4:e1000151. 2008
    ....
  14. doi request reprint Yeast Barcoders: a chemogenomic application of a universal donor-strain collection carrying bar-code identifiers
    Zhun Yan
    Terrence Donnelly Center for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, University of Toronto, 160 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E1, Canada
    Nat Methods 5:719-25. 2008
    ..1% of all essential yeast genes. These experiments validate both the Barcoders and the DAmP strain collection as useful tools for genome-wide chemical-genetic assays...
  15. pmc Identification of small molecule inhibitors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S using a yeast phenotypic screen
    Anthony Arnoldo
    Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    PLoS Genet 4:e1000005. 2008
    ..Taken together, our integrated cell-based, chemical-genetic approach demonstrates that such screens can augment traditional drug screening approaches and facilitate the discovery of new compounds against a broad range of human pathogens...
  16. ncbi request reprint Chemical-genetic approaches for exploring the mode of action of natural products
    Andres Lopez
    Banting and Best Department of Medical Research and Department of Medical Genetics and Microbiology, Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, University of Toronto, 160 College Street, Toronto, Canada
    Prog Drug Res 66:237, 239-71. 2008
    ..Extensive application of chemical genetics in yeast has the potential to develop a small molecule inhibitor for the majority of all approximately 6000 yeast genes...
  17. ncbi request reprint Identification of genes involved in the toxic response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae against iron and copper overload by parallel analysis of deletion mutants
    William J Jo
    Department of Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology, Superfund Basic Research Program corrected University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, USA
    Toxicol Sci 101:140-51. 2008
    ....
  18. pmc Accelerating the discovery of biologically active small molecules using a high-throughput yeast halo assay
    Nadine C Gassner
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    J Nat Prod 70:383-90. 2007
    ..There were 46 active compounds among the NCI set. One very active extract was selected for bioactivity-guided fractionation, resulting in the identification of crambescidin 800 as a potent antifungal agent...
  19. pmc Mechanisms of haploinsufficiency revealed by genome-wide profiling in yeast
    Adam M Deutschbauer
    Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305, USA
    Genetics 169:1915-25. 2005
    ..Overall, our results suggest that the primary mechanism of haploinsufficiency in yeast is due to insufficient protein production. We discuss the relevance of our findings in yeast to human haploinsufficiency disorders...
  20. pmc Functional genomic analysis of the rates of protein evolution
    Dennis P Wall
    Department of Biological Sciences, and Stanford Genome Technology Center, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:5483-8. 2005
    ....
  21. ncbi request reprint A latent variable model for chemogenomic profiling
    Patrick Flaherty
    Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
    Bioinformatics 21:3286-93. 2005
    ..The model also incorporates the functional annotation of known genes to guide the clustering procedure...
  22. pmc Genome-wide requirements for resistance to functionally distinct DNA-damaging agents
    William Lee
    Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS Genet 1:e24. 2005
    ..Further genetic analysis allowed determination of epistasis for one of these functional groups...
  23. pmc Examining protein protein interactions using endogenously tagged yeast arrays: the cross-and-capture system
    Bernhard Suter
    Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E1, Canada
    Genome Res 17:1774-82. 2007
    ..Our studies establish the "Cross-and-Capture" assay as a novel, versatile tool that provides a valuable complement for the next generation of yeast proteomic studies...
  24. pmc Noise minimization in eukaryotic gene expression
    Hunter B Fraser
    Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, USA
    PLoS Biol 2:e137. 2004
    ..Our results support the hypothesis that noise in gene expression is a biologically important variable, is generally detrimental to organismal fitness, and is subject to natural selection...
  25. ncbi request reprint Experimental approaches to identify genetic networks
    Michael Costanzo
    Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, University of Toronto, 160 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E1, Canada
    Curr Opin Biotechnol 17:472-80. 2006
    ..Many of these experimental approaches have been adopted and adapted to study other systems, including worm, fly, fish and mammalian cultured cells, using an ingenious set of molecular tools...
  26. pmc The extensive and condition-dependent nature of epistasis among whole-genome duplicates in yeast
    Gabriel Musso
    Banting and Best Department of Medical Research, Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E1, Canada
    Genome Res 18:1092-9. 2008
    ....
  27. pmc Systematic pathway analysis using high-resolution fitness profiling of combinatorial gene deletions
    Robert P St Onge
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Genet 39:199-206. 2007
    ..Our results emphasize the utility of small molecules and multifactorial deletion mutants in uncovering functional relationships and pathway order...
  28. pmc Defining genetic interaction
    Ramamurthy Mani
    Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, 250 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:3461-6. 2008
    ..Additionally, we show that the Additive and Log definitions, each commonly used in population genetics, lead to differing conclusions related to the selective advantages of sexual reproduction...
  29. pmc Transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to DNA-damaging agents does not identify the genes that protect against these agents
    Geoff W Birrell
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99:8778-83. 2002
    ..The data also suggest that the nature of the lesions produced by DNA-damaging agents cannot easily be deduced from gene expression profiling...