Sanjiv Sam Gambhir

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Tetraphenylphosphonium as a novel molecular probe for imaging tumors
    Jung Jun Min
    Department of Radiology and the Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Nucl Med 45:636-43. 2004
  2. ncbi request reprint Oxygen sensitivity of reporter genes: implications for preclinical imaging of tumor hypoxia
    Ivana Cecic
    Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Imaging Program, Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5847, USA
    Mol Imaging 6:219-28. 2007
  3. doi request reprint Molecualr imaging of cancer: from molecules to humans. Introduction
    Sanjiv Sam Gambhir
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5427, USA
    J Nucl Med 49:1S-4S. 2008
  4. pmc A hybrid least squares and principal component analysis algorithm for Raman spectroscopy
    Dominique Van de Sompel
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS ONE 7:e38850. 2012
  5. pmc Improving image quality by accounting for changes in water temperature during a photoacoustic tomography scan
    Dominique Van de Sompel
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e45337. 2012
  6. pmc Development and validation of non-integrative, self-limited, and replicating minicircles for safe reporter gene imaging of cell-based therapies
    John A Ronald
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e73138. 2013
  7. pmc MicroRNA-regulated non-viral vectors with improved tumor specificity in an orthotopic rat model of hepatocellular carcinoma
    J A Ronald
    1 Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA 2 Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Gene Ther 20:1006-13. 2013
  8. pmc GLUT 5 is not over-expressed in breast cancer cells and patient breast cancer tissues
    Gayatri Gowrishankar
    Molecular Imaging Program, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e26902. 2011
  9. pmc A brain tumor molecular imaging strategy using a new triple-modality MRI-photoacoustic-Raman nanoparticle
    Moritz F Kircher
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, California, USA
    Nat Med 18:829-34. 2012
  10. doi request reprint Imaging circulating tumor cells in freely moving awake small animals using a miniaturized intravital microscope
    Laura Sarah Sasportas
    Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 9:e86759. 2014

Research Grants

Detail Information

Publications151 found, 100 shown here

  1. ncbi request reprint Tetraphenylphosphonium as a novel molecular probe for imaging tumors
    Jung Jun Min
    Department of Radiology and the Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Nucl Med 45:636-43. 2004
    ..In this study, we characterize the tumor accumulation of (3)H-TPP and compare it with (18)F-FDG in cell culture and in xenograft, metastatic, and inflammation models in living animals...
  2. ncbi request reprint Oxygen sensitivity of reporter genes: implications for preclinical imaging of tumor hypoxia
    Ivana Cecic
    Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Imaging Program, Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5847, USA
    Mol Imaging 6:219-28. 2007
    ..These results demonstrate that combining beta-galactosidase with the DDAOG optical probe may be a robust reporter system for the in vivo study of tumor hypoxia...
  3. doi request reprint Molecualr imaging of cancer: from molecules to humans. Introduction
    Sanjiv Sam Gambhir
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5427, USA
    J Nucl Med 49:1S-4S. 2008
  4. pmc A hybrid least squares and principal component analysis algorithm for Raman spectroscopy
    Dominique Van de Sompel
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS ONE 7:e38850. 2012
    ..The experiments consider both simulated data and experimental data acquired from in vitro solutions of Raman-enhanced gold-silica nanoparticles...
  5. pmc Improving image quality by accounting for changes in water temperature during a photoacoustic tomography scan
    Dominique Van de Sompel
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e45337. 2012
    ..Since air bubbles pose a common problem in ultrasonic and photoacoustic imaging systems, our results will be useful to future small animal imaging studies that use scanners with similarly limited heating units...
  6. pmc Development and validation of non-integrative, self-limited, and replicating minicircles for safe reporter gene imaging of cell-based therapies
    John A Ronald
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e73138. 2013
    ..This will lead to safe tools to assess treatment response at earlier time points and improve the precision of cell-based therapies...
  7. pmc MicroRNA-regulated non-viral vectors with improved tumor specificity in an orthotopic rat model of hepatocellular carcinoma
    J A Ronald
    1 Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA 2 Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Gene Ther 20:1006-13. 2013
    ..Considering the heterogeneity of miRNA expression in human HCC, this information will be important in guiding development of more personalized vectors for the treatment of this devastating disease. ..
  8. pmc GLUT 5 is not over-expressed in breast cancer cells and patient breast cancer tissues
    Gayatri Gowrishankar
    Molecular Imaging Program, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e26902. 2011
    ..Taken together these results are consistent with GLUT 5 not being essential for fructose uptake in breast cancer cells and tissues...
  9. pmc A brain tumor molecular imaging strategy using a new triple-modality MRI-photoacoustic-Raman nanoparticle
    Moritz F Kircher
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, California, USA
    Nat Med 18:829-34. 2012
    ..This new triple-modality-nanoparticle approach has promise for enabling more accurate brain tumor imaging and resection...
  10. doi request reprint Imaging circulating tumor cells in freely moving awake small animals using a miniaturized intravital microscope
    Laura Sarah Sasportas
    Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 9:e86759. 2014
    ..These data represent the first reported use we know of for a miniature mountable intravital microscopy setup for in vivo imaging of CTCs in awake animals. ..
  11. pmc A transgenic tri-modality reporter mouse
    Xinrui Yan
    Departments of Radiology, MIPS and Bio X, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS ONE 8:e73580. 2013
    ..In summary, this mouse can be used as a source of donor cells and organs in various research areas such as stem cell research, tissue engineering research, and organ transplantation. ..
  12. pmc Development and application of stable phantoms for the evaluation of photoacoustic imaging instruments
    Sarah E Bohndiek
    Bio X Program and Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e75533. 2013
    ....
  13. pmc A molecularly engineered split reporter for imaging protein-protein interactions with positron emission tomography
    Tarik F Massoud
    Department of Radiology, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, UK
    Nat Med 16:921-6. 2010
    ....
  14. pmc A c-Myc activation sensor-based high-throughput drug screening identifies an antineoplastic effect of nitazoxanide
    Hua Fan-Minogue
    Corresponding Author Sanjiv S Gambhir, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, 318 Campus Drive, East Wing, 1st Floor, Stanford, CA 94305 5427
    Mol Cancer Ther 12:1896-905. 2013
    ..Our work also demonstrated the unique advantage of molecular imaging in accelerating discovery of drugs for c-Myc-targeted cancer therapy...
  15. pmc Quantum dot imaging for embryonic stem cells
    Shuan Lin
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS and Bio X Program, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    BMC Biotechnol 7:67. 2007
    ..In this report, we aimed to evaluate in vivo multiplex imaging of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells labeled with Qtracker delivered quantum dots (QDs)...
  16. ncbi request reprint A new strategy to screen molecular imaging probe uptake in cell culture without radiolabeling using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry
    Zhen Cheng
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, and Bio X Program, Stanford University, 318 Campus Drive, Clark Center E 150, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Nucl Med 46:878-86. 2005
    ..Specifically, MALDI-TOF-MS was used to screen a small library of phosphonium cations for their ability to accumulate in cells...
  17. doi request reprint A novel high-sensitivity rapid-acquisition single-photon cardiac imaging camera
    Sanjiv S Gambhir
    Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering, Molecular Imaging Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    J Nucl Med 50:635-43. 2009
    ..The compact new camera uses a unique method for localizing gamma-photon information with a bank of 9 solid-state detector columns with tungsten collimators that rotate independently...
  18. doi request reprint 64Cu-labeled affibody molecules for imaging of HER2 expressing tumors
    Zhen Cheng
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering, Bio X Program, Stanford University, California, CA 94305 5344, USA
    Mol Imaging Biol 12:316-24. 2010
    ..The development of molecular probes based on novel engineered protein constructs is under active investigation due to the great potential of this generalizable strategy for imaging a variety of tumor targets...
  19. ncbi request reprint An improved bioluminescence resonance energy transfer strategy for imaging intracellular events in single cells and living subjects
    Abhijit De
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford and Bio X Program, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Cancer Res 67:7175-83. 2007
    ..Applications will include anticancer therapy screening in cell culture and in small living animals...
  20. doi request reprint Small-animal PET imaging of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 expression with site-specific 18F-labeled protein scaffold molecules
    Zhen Cheng
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Bio X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Nucl Med 49:804-13. 2008
    ....
  21. pmc An engineered knottin peptide labeled with 18F for PET imaging of integrin expression
    Zheng Miao
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Bio X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 20:2342-7. 2009
    ..5D allows integrin-specific PET imaging of U87MG tumors with good contrast and further demonstrates that knottins are excellent peptide scaffolds for development of PET probes with potential for clinical translation...
  22. doi request reprint Novel strategy for a cocktail 18F-fluoride and 18F-FDG PET/CT scan for evaluation of malignancy: results of the pilot-phase study
    Andrei Iagaru
    Division of Nuclear Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California, USA
    J Nucl Med 50:501-5. 2009
    ..Sodium (18)F was previously used for bone imaging and can be used as a PET/CT skeletal tracer. The combined administration of (18)F and (18)F-FDG in a single PET/CT study for cancer detection has not been reported to date...
  23. pmc Engineered knottin peptides: a new class of agents for imaging integrin expression in living subjects
    Richard H Kimura
    Department of Bioengineering, Cancer Center, Bio X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Cancer Res 69:2435-42. 2009
    ..Thus, engineered integrin-binding knottin peptides show great potential as clinical diagnostics for a variety of cancers...
  24. ncbi request reprint Small-animal PET of melanocortin 1 receptor expression using a 18F-labeled alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone analog
    Zhen Cheng
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Nucl Med 48:987-94. 2007
    ..It is a promising molecular target for diagnosis and therapy of melanomas. However, (18)F compounds have not been successfully developed for imaging the MC1R...
  25. doi request reprint Monitoring caspase-3 activation with a multimodality imaging sensor in living subjects
    Pritha Ray
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering, Bio X Program, School of Medicine, Stanford University, California 94305 5427, USA
    Clin Cancer Res 14:5801-9. 2008
    ..Herein, we applied a multimodality reporter vector to monitor caspase-3 activation indirectly in live cells and tumors of living animals undergoing apoptosis...
  26. ncbi request reprint Imaging chemically modified adenovirus for targeting tumors expressing integrin alphavbeta3 in living mice with mutant herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase PET reporter gene
    Zhengming Xiong
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, MIPS, Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5484, USA
    J Nucl Med 47:130-9. 2006
    ....
  27. pmc Near-infrared fluorescent deoxyglucose analogue for tumor optical imaging in cell culture and living mice
    Zhen Cheng
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, 94305 5344, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 17:662-9. 2006
    ..To develop NIR glucose analogues with the ability to target GLUTs/hexokinase, it is highly important to select NIR dyes with a reasonable molecular size...
  28. doi request reprint Pilot prospective evaluation of 99mTc-MDP scintigraphy, 18F NaF PET/CT, 18F FDG PET/CT and whole-body MRI for detection of skeletal metastases
    Andrei Iagaru
    Division of Nuclear Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA, USA
    Clin Nucl Med 38:e290-6. 2013
    ..The aim of this study was to compare 99mTc-MDP bone scanning, 18F NaF PET/CT, 18F FDG PET/CT, and whole-body MRI (WBMRI) for detection of known osseous metastases...
  29. doi request reprint Combined 18F-fluoride and 18F-FDG PET/CT scanning for evaluation of malignancy: results of an international multicenter trial
    Andrei Iagaru
    Division of Nuclear Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Nucl Med 54:176-83. 2013
    ..We prospectively evaluated combined (18)F(-)/(18)F-FDG as a single PET/CT examination for evaluation of cancer patients and compared it with separate (18)F(-) PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans...
  30. pmc Non-invasive imaging of cysteine cathepsin activity in solid tumors using a 64Cu-labeled activity-based probe
    Gang Ren
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e28029. 2011
    ..Overall, these results demonstrate that small molecule activity-based probes carrying radio-tracers can be used to image protease activity in living subjects...
  31. pmc BRET3: a red-shifted bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-based integrated platform for imaging protein-protein interactions from single live cells and living animals
    Abhijit De
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Bioengineering and Bio X Program, The James H Clark Center, 318 Campus Dr, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    FASEB J 23:2702-9. 2009
    ..The development of further BRET3-based assays will allow imaging of protein-protein interactions using a single assay directly scalable from intact living cells to small living subjects, allowing accelerated drug discovery...
  32. doi request reprint Direct site-specific radiolabeling of an Affibody protein with 4-[18F]fluorobenzaldehyde via oxime chemistry
    Mohammad Namavari
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bioengineering, Bio X Program, Stanford University, 318 Campus Dr, Clark Center, E 150, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Imaging Biol 10:177-81. 2008
    ..In this study, we introduce a methodology for preparing 18F-labeled Affibody protein, specifically 18F-Anti-HER2 dimeric Affibody (14 kDa), for in vivo imaging of HER2neu with positron emission tomography (PET)...
  33. ncbi request reprint Fluorescent fructose derivatives for imaging breast cancer cells
    Jelena Levi
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 18:628-34. 2007
    ..5 likely introduces big structural and electronic changes, leading to a fructose derivative that does not accurately describe the uptake of fructose in cells...
  34. ncbi request reprint Construction and validation of improved triple fusion reporter gene vectors for molecular imaging of living subjects
    Pritha Ray
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering, Bio X Program, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Cancer Res 67:3085-93. 2007
    ..This improved triple fusion reporter vector will enable high sensitivity detection of lower numbers of cells from living animals using the combined bioluminescence, fluorescence, and microPET imaging techniques...
  35. doi request reprint A hybrid least squares and principal component analysis algorithm for Raman spectroscopy
    Dominique Van de Sompel
    Stanford MIPS, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 2011:6971-4. 2011
    ..Our experiments use both simulated data and data acquired from an in vitro solution of Raman-enhanced gold nanoparticles...
  36. pmc Design, synthesis, and imaging of an activatable photoacoustic probe
    Jelena Levi
    Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California 94305, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 132:11264-9. 2010
    ..We have found that the photoacoustic signal did not correlate with the absorbance and fluorescence of the molecules, as the highest photoacoustic signal arose from the least absorbing quenchers, BHQ3 and QXL 680...
  37. doi request reprint Molecular imaging of the efficacy of heat shock protein 90 inhibitors in living subjects
    Carmel T Chan
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5427, USA
    Cancer Res 68:216-26. 2008
    ....
  38. doi request reprint Proof-of-concept study of monitoring cancer drug therapy with cerenkov luminescence imaging
    Yingding Xu
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Nucl Med 53:312-7. 2012
    ..Two common radiotracers, 3'-deoxy-3'-(18)F-fluorothymidine ((18)F-FLT) and (18)F-FDG, were used to monitor bevacizumab treatment efficacy...
  39. pmc Ultrahigh sensitivity carbon nanotube agents for photoacoustic molecular imaging in living mice
    Adam de la Zerda
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California 94305, USA
    Nano Lett 10:2168-72. 2010
    ..Finally, we show that the new contrast agent can detect approximately 20 times fewer cancer cells than previously reported SWNTs...
  40. ncbi request reprint (18)F-FDG-PET/CT evaluation of response to treatment in lymphoma: when is the optimal time for the first re-evaluation scan?
    Andrei Iagaru
    Division of Nuclear Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Dr, Room H 0101, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Hell J Nucl Med 11:153-6. 2008
    ..80 in group B. Results of PET/CT after 2 cycles of chemotherapy did not statistically differ from the results of PET/CT after 4 cycles of chemotherapy. These results need to be confirmed in larger, prospective, randomized trials...
  41. ncbi request reprint In vivo bioluminescence tumor imaging of RGD peptide-modified adenoviral vector encoding firefly luciferase reporter gene
    Gang Niu
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Mol Imaging Biol 9:126-34. 2007
    ..The goal of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of chemically modified human adenovirus (Ad) vectors for tumor retargeting...
  42. doi request reprint Stem cell-mediated accelerated bone healing observed with in vivo molecular and small animal imaging technologies in a model of skeletal injury
    Sheen Woo Lee
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive S 062B, Stanford, California 94304, USA
    J Orthop Res 27:295-302. 2009
    ..Imaging can in the future help establish therapeutic strategies including dosage and administration route...
  43. doi request reprint Positron emission tomography of 64Cu-DOTA-Rituximab in a transgenic mouse model expressing human CD20 for clinical translation to image NHL
    Arutselvan Natarajan
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Imaging Biol 14:608-16. 2012
    ..This study aims to evaluate (64)Cu-DOTA-rituximab (PETRIT) in a preclinical transgenic mouse model expressing human CD20 for potential clinical translation...
  44. pmc Crystal structures of the luciferase and green fluorescent protein from Renilla reniformis
    Andreas Markus Loening
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, The James H Clark Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, 318 Campus Drive, Clark E150, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    J Mol Biol 374:1017-28. 2007
    ..During the course of this work, the structure of the luciferase's accessory green fluorescent protein (RrGFP) was also determined and shown to be highly similar to that of Aequorea victoria GFP...
  45. ncbi request reprint Bioluminescent monitoring of NIS-mediated (131)I ablative effects in MCF-7 xenografts
    Malavika Ghosh
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Imaging 5:76-84. 2006
    ..In summary, a pattern of tumor regression occurring over the first three weeks after (131)I administration was observed in NIS-expressing breast cancer xenografts...
  46. pmc Shape matters: intravital microscopy reveals surprising geometrical dependence for nanoparticles in tumor models of extravasation
    Bryan Ronain Smith
    Radiology and Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, United States
    Nano Lett 12:3369-77. 2012
    ..This work quantitatively indicates that nanoscale extravasational competence is highly dependent on nanoparticle geometry and is heterogeneous...
  47. doi request reprint Prospective evaluation of (99m)Tc MDP scintigraphy, (18)F NaF PET/CT, and (18)F FDG PET/CT for detection of skeletal metastases
    Andrei Iagaru
    Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Imaging Biol 14:252-9. 2012
    ..There are few prospective studies comparing these three methods of detection of skeletal metastases. Thus, we were prompted to initiate this prospective pilot trial...
  48. ncbi request reprint Noninvasive imaging of molecular events with bioluminescent reporter genes in living subjects
    Pritha Ray
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Bio X Program, Stanford University, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 411:131-44. 2007
    ..Here we describe the methods and applications of firefly and renilla luciferases in molecular imaging using small animals...
  49. ncbi request reprint Noninvasive monitoring of target gene expression by imaging reporter gene expression in living animals using improved bicistronic vectors
    Yanling Wang
    The Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California, USA
    J Nucl Med 46:667-74. 2005
    ....
  50. ncbi request reprint A tracer kinetic model for 18F-FHBG for quantitating herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase reporter gene expression in living animals using PET
    Leeta Alison Green
    The Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California, USA
    J Nucl Med 45:1560-70. 2004
    ..We therefore investigated tracer kinetic models for 18F-FHBG dynamic microPET data and noninvasive methods for determining blood time-activity curves in an adenoviral gene delivery model in mice...
  51. ncbi request reprint Firefly luciferase enzyme fragment complementation for imaging in cells and living animals
    Ramasamy Paulmurugan
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology and the Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, James H Clark Center, 318 Campus Drive, East Wing, First Floor, Stanford, California 94305 5427, USA
    Anal Chem 77:1295-302. 2005
    ....
  52. pmc Multimodality imaging of tumor xenografts and metastases in mice with combined small-animal PET, small-animal CT, and bioluminescence imaging
    Christophe M Deroose
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Nucl Med 48:295-303. 2007
    ..One of the disadvantages of these imaging modalities is the lack of anatomic information. We combined small-animal PET and BLI technology with small-animal CT to obtain fusion images with both molecular and anatomic information...
  53. pmc A novel method for direct site-specific radiolabeling of peptides using [18F]FDG
    Mohammad Namavari
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering, Bio X Program, Stanford University, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 20:432-6. 2009
    ..The results have implications for radiolabeling of other macromolecules and would lead to a very simple strategy for routine preclinical and clinical use...
  54. doi request reprint Deep tissue photoacoustic imaging using a miniaturized 2-D capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer array
    Sri Rajasekhar Kothapalli
    Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94035, USA
    IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 59:1199-204. 2012
    ..Results demonstrate that CMUTs with integrated front-end amplifier circuits are an attractive choice for achieving relatively high depth sensitivity for PAI...
  55. doi request reprint Evaluation of 89Zr-rituximab tracer by Cerenkov luminescence imaging and correlation with PET in a humanized transgenic mouse model to image NHL
    Arutselvan Natarajan
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, James H Clark Center, 318 Campus Drive, E153, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Imaging Biol 15:468-75. 2013
    ....
  56. ncbi request reprint 64Cu-labeled alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone analog for microPET imaging of melanocortin 1 receptor expression
    Zhen Cheng
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5344, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 18:765-72. 2007
    ..This study demonstrates that 64Cu-DOTA-NAPamide is a promising molecular probe for alpha-MSH receptor positive melanoma PET imaging as well as MC1R expression imaging in living mice...
  57. pmc Molecular photoacoustic imaging of follicular thyroid carcinoma
    Jelena Levi
    Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California 94305, USA
    Clin Cancer Res 19:1494-502. 2013
    ..To evaluate the potential of targeted photoacoustic imaging as a noninvasive method for detection of follicular thyroid carcinoma...
  58. doi request reprint Prospective comparison of combined 18F-FDG and 18F-NaF PET/CT vs. 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging for detection of malignancy
    Frank I Lin
    Division of Nuclear Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Dr, Room H 2230, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 39:262-70. 2012
    ..In the current study, we compared the clinical usefulness of a combined (18)F-FDG/(18)F-NaF PET/CT scan with that of a separate (18)F-FDG-only PET/CT scan...
  59. doi request reprint Perspectives of molecular imaging and radioimmunotherapy in lymphoma
    Andrei Iagaru
    Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Room H 0101, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Radiol Clin North Am 46:243-52, viii. 2008
    ..Finally, we discuss advances in molecular imaging that may herald the next generation of PET radiotracers after 18F FDG...
  60. doi request reprint Simulations of virtual PET/CT 3-D bronchoscopy imaging using a physical porcine lung-heart phantom
    David Yerushalmi
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, The James H Clark Center, 318 Campus Drive, E150, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Imaging Biol 11:275-82. 2009
    ....
  61. ncbi request reprint Semiautomated radiosynthesis and biological evaluation of [18F]FEAU: a novel PET imaging agent for HSV1-tk/sr39tk reporter gene expression
    Frederick T Chin
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5484, USA
    Mol Imaging Biol 10:82-91. 2008
    ..Although further studies are needed, early results also suggest [(18)F]FEAU is a promising PET radiotracer for monitoring HSV1-tk reporter gene expression...
  62. ncbi request reprint Dual-function probe for PET and near-infrared fluorescence imaging of tumor vasculature
    Weibo Cai
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology, and Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5484, USA
    J Nucl Med 48:1862-70. 2007
    ..The development of a dual-function PET/near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) probe can allow for accurate assessment of the pharmacokinetics and tumor-targeting efficacy of QDs...
  63. pmc Functionality of androgen receptor-based gene expression imaging in hormone refractory prostate cancer
    Makoto Sato
    Department of Urology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA
    Clin Cancer Res 11:3743-9. 2005
    ....
  64. pmc Dual-targeted contrast agent for US assessment of tumor angiogenesis in vivo
    Jurgen K Willmann
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, The James H Clark Center, 318 Campus Dr, East Wing, 1st Floor, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Radiology 248:936-44. 2008
    ....
  65. ncbi request reprint microPET imaging of glioma integrin {alpha}v{beta}3 expression using (64)Cu-labeled tetrameric RGD peptide
    Yun Wu
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Nucl Med 46:1707-18. 2005
    ..Radiolabeled RGD peptides that are integrin specific can be used for noninvasive imaging of integrin expression level as well as for integrin-targeted radionuclide therapy...
  66. pmc Functional and transcriptional characterization of human embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells for treatment of myocardial infarction
    Zongjin Li
    Department of Radiology and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS ONE 4:e8443. 2009
    ..Moreover, to fully understand the beneficial effects of stem cell therapy, investigators must be able to track the functional biology and physiology of transplanted cells in living subjects over time...
  67. ncbi request reprint Reproducibility of 3'-deoxy-3'-(18)F-fluorothymidine microPET studies in tumor xenografts in mice
    Jeffrey R Tseng
    Molecular Imaging Program of Stanford, Bio X Program, and Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Nucl Med 46:1851-7. 2005
    ..The purpose of this study was to determine the reproducibility of (18)F-FLT microPET studies...
  68. ncbi request reprint PET imaging of colorectal cancer in xenograft-bearing mice by use of an 18F-labeled T84.66 anti-carcinoembryonic antigen diabody
    Weibo Cai
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    J Nucl Med 48:304-10. 2007
    ..66 diabody, a genetically engineered noncovalent dimer of single-chain variable fragments, for small-animal PET imaging of CEA expression in xenograft-bearing mice...
  69. ncbi request reprint CL1-SR39: A noninvasive molecular imaging model of prostate cancer suicide gene therapy using positron emission tomography
    Allan J Pantuck
    Department of Urology, Pharmacology and Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, USA
    J Urol 168:1193-8. 2002
    ..We developed a prostate cancer tumor model capable of being noninvasively imaged using positron emission tomography (PET) based on expression of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene...
  70. pmc Photoacoustic ocular imaging
    Adam de la Zerda
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, the Bio X Program and the Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California 94305, USA
    Opt Lett 35:270-2. 2010
    ..Such a system may be used in the future for early detection and improved management of neovascular ocular diseases, including wet age-related macular degeneration and proliferative diabetic retinopathy...
  71. ncbi request reprint Multimodality imaging of T-cell hybridoma trafficking in collagen-induced arthritic mice: image-based estimation of the number of cells accumulating in mouse paws
    Shahriar S Yaghoubi
    Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Bio X, Molecular Imaging Program, Stanford, California 94305 5427, USA
    J Biomed Opt 12:064025. 2007
    ..The procedures described in this study can be used to derive equations for cells expressing other bioluminescent RGs and in other animal models...
  72. ncbi request reprint Noninvasive imaging of protein-protein interactions from live cells and living subjects using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer
    Abhijit De
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS and Bio X Program, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    FASEB J 19:2017-9. 2005
    ..This work validates BRET as a powerful tool for interrogating and observing protein-protein interactions directly at limited depths in living mice...
  73. pmc Imaging of VEGF receptor in a rat myocardial infarction model using PET
    Martin Rodriguez-Porcel
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    J Nucl Med 49:667-73. 2008
    ..We have developed a PET tracer (64Cu-DOTA-VEGF121 [DOTA is 1,4,7,10-tetraazadodecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid]) to image VEGF receptor (VEGFR) expression after MI in the living subject...
  74. pmc Unexpected dissemination patterns in lymphoma progression revealed by serial imaging within a murine lymph node
    Ken Ito
    Molecular Imaging Program, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Cancer Res 72:6111-8. 2012
    ..Our findings argue that in NHL an efflux of tumor cells from one disease site to another, distant site in which they become established occurs in discrete bursts...
  75. ncbi request reprint 123I MIBG mapping with intraoperative gamma probe for recurrent neuroblastoma
    Andrei Iagaru
    Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Mol Imaging Biol 10:19-23. 2008
    ..Intraoperative gamma probe mapping of the liver identified areas with signal above the background, but these were prove to be hemosiderin deposits on histo-pathology examination...
  76. doi request reprint Real-time intravital imaging of RGD-quantum dot binding to luminal endothelium in mouse tumor neovasculature
    Bryan Ronain Smith
    The Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nano Lett 8:2599-606. 2008
    ..Equally vital, the work provides a platform by which to design and optimize molecularly targeted nanoparticles including quantum dots for applications in living subjects...
  77. ncbi request reprint (18)F and (18)FDG PET imaging of osteosarcoma to non-invasively monitor in situ changes in cellular proliferation and bone differentiation upon MYC inactivation
    Constadina Arvanitis
    Department of Chemical and Systems Biology, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94403, USA
    Cancer Biol Ther 7:1947-51. 2008
    ....
  78. pmc MYC phosphorylation, activation, and tumorigenic potential in hepatocellular carcinoma are regulated by HMG-CoA reductase
    Zhongwei Cao
    Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine and Pathology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Cancer Res 71:2286-97. 2011
    ..The inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase may be a useful target for the treatment of MYC-associated HCC as well as other tumors...
  79. pmc A comparison between time domain and spectral imaging systems for imaging quantum dots in small living animals
    Adam de la Zerda
    Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, The Bio X Program, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Imaging Biol 12:500-8. 2010
    ..Maestro (SI, CRi Inc.), and IVIS-Spectrum (SI, Caliper Life Sciences Inc.)...
  80. ncbi request reprint Bisdeoxycoelenterazine derivatives for improvement of bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays
    Jelena Levi
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology, Bio X Program, Stanford University, 318 Campus Drive, E 150, Stanford, California 94305 5427, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 129:11900-1. 2007
  81. doi request reprint Applications of lentiviral vectors in noninvasive molecular imaging
    Abhijit De
    Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 433:177-202. 2008
    ..The protocols described here are standardized for mouse models, which can also be adapted for other small animal models (e.g., rats)...
  82. pmc 18F-FDG PET/CT evaluation of patients with ovarian carcinoma
    Andrei H Iagaru
    Department of Radiolog, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Stanford, CA, USA
    Nucl Med Commun 29:1046-51. 2008
    ..Therefore, we were prompted to review our experience with PET/CT in the management of patients with ovarian carcinoma...
  83. ncbi request reprint Molecular imaging of drug-modulated protein-protein interactions in living subjects
    Ramasamy Paulmurugan
    Department of Radiology and the Bio X Program, James H Clark Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Cancer Res 64:2113-9. 2004
    ..Both are essential steps in the preclinical evaluation of candidate pharmaceutical agents targeting protein-protein interactions, including signaling pathways in cancer cells...
  84. ncbi request reprint Quantitative PET imaging of tumor integrin alphavbeta3 expression with 18F-FRGD2
    Xianzhong Zhang
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, MIPS, and Bio X Program, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, California 94305 5484, USA
    J Nucl Med 47:113-21. 2006
    ..We labeled the dimeric RGD peptide E[c(RGDyK)](2) with (18)F and evaluated its tumor-targeting efficacy and pharmacokinetics of (18)F-FB-E[c(RGDyK)](2) ((18)F-FRGD2)...
  85. ncbi request reprint Reproducibility of 18F-FDG microPET studies in mouse tumor xenografts
    Mangal Dandekar
    Department of Radiology and the Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Nucl Med 48:602-7. 2007
    ..However, the reproducibility of serial scans has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to determine the reproducibility of (18)F-FDG small-animal PET studies...
  86. pmc A potent, imaging adenoviral vector driven by the cancer-selective mucin-1 promoter that targets breast cancer metastasis
    Steven T Huyn
    Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, University of California at Los Angeles School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, USA
    Clin Cancer Res 15:3126-34. 2009
    ..Improvements in these areas will play a profound role in reducing mortality from breast cancer...
  87. doi request reprint A 2-helix small protein labeled with 68Ga for PET imaging of HER2 expression
    Gang Ren
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    J Nucl Med 50:1492-9. 2009
    ....
  88. ncbi request reprint Preclinical efficacy of the c-Met inhibitor CE-355621 in a U87 MG mouse xenograft model evaluated by 18F-FDG small-animal PET
    Jeffrey R Tseng
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Bio X Program, and Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5427, USA
    J Nucl Med 49:129-34. 2008
    ..The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of CE-355621, a novel antibody against c-Met, in a subcutaneous U87 MG xenograft mouse model using (18)F-FDG small-animal PET...
  89. ncbi request reprint Molecular imaging: the vision and opportunity for radiology in the future
    John M Hoffman
    Department of Radiology, University of Utah School of Medicine, 2000 Circle of Hope, Suite 2121, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 5550, USA
    Radiology 244:39-47. 2007
    ....
  90. doi request reprint US imaging of tumor angiogenesis with microbubbles targeted to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2 in mice
    Jurgen K Willmann
    Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, James H Clark Center, 318 Campus Dr, East Wing, 1st Floor, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Radiology 246:508-18. 2008
    ..To prospectively evaluate contrast material-enhanced ultrasonography (US) with microbubbles targeted to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2 (VEGFR2) for imaging tumor angiogenesis in two murine tumor models...
  91. ncbi request reprint Molecular imaging of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha and von Hippel-Lindau interaction in mice
    Clara Y H Choi
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5152, USA
    Mol Imaging 7:139-46. 2008
    ..This method represents a new approach for studying interaction of proteins involved in the regulation of protein degradation...
  92. ncbi request reprint Visualization of telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter activity using a trimodality fusion reporter construct
    Parasuraman Padmanabhan
    Department of Radiology and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    J Nucl Med 47:270-7. 2006
    ..To achieve this goal, we used radionuclide and optical methods to measure changes in human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene expression in tumor cells before and after 5-fluorouracil treatment...
  93. ncbi request reprint Molecular imaging can accelerate anti-angiogenic drug development and testing
    Andrei Iagaru
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Nat Clin Pract Oncol 4:556-7. 2007
  94. doi request reprint Imaging tumor angiogenesis: the road to clinical utility
    Andrei Iagaru
    Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Dr, Rm H 0101, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    AJR Am J Roentgenol 201:W183-91. 2013
    ..The ability to noninvasively visualize angiogenesis may provide new opportunities to more appropriately select patients for antiangiogenesis treatment and to monitor treatment efficacy...
  95. doi request reprint Immunomodulation of curcumin on adoptive therapy with T cell functional imaging in mice
    Ya Fang Chang
    Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan
    Cancer Prev Res (Phila) 5:444-52. 2012
    ..In addition, using a granzyme B-specific imaging reporter to assess T-cell function may also be applied for the development and therapeutic evaluation of new immunotherapy in preclinical studies...
  96. doi request reprint 90Y-ibritumomab therapy in refractory non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: observations from 111In-ibritumomab pretreatment imaging
    Andrei Iagaru
    Division of Nuclear Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Nucl Med 49:1809-12. 2008
    ..90Y-ibritumomab is an antibody targeting CD20 receptors on the surface of lymphocytes. We present observations from our clinical experience with 90Y-ibritumomab in the management of NHL...
  97. pmc Multimodality imaging of β-cells in mouse models of type 1 and 2 diabetes
    Jing Yong
    Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA
    Diabetes 60:1383-92. 2011
    ..This should enable the noninvasive imaging of β-cells by charge-coupled device (CCD) and micro-positron emission tomography (PET), as well as the identification of β-cells at the cellular level by fluorescent microscopy...
  98. pmc Assessing delivery and quantifying efficacy of small interfering ribonucleic acid therapeutics in the skin using a dual-axis confocal microscope
    Hyejun Ra
    Stanford University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Ginzton Laboratory, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Biomed Opt 15:036027. 2010
    ..Visualization of transdermal delivery of nucleic acids will play an important role in the development of innovative strategies for treating skin pathologies...
  99. pmc Antiangiogenic cancer therapy: monitoring with molecular US and a clinically translatable contrast agent (BR55)
    Marybeth A Pysz
    Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Dr, Room H1307, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Radiology 256:519-27. 2010
    ..To develop and test human kinase insert domain receptor (KDR)-targeted microbubbles (MBs) (MB(KDR)) for imaging KDR at the molecular level and for monitoring antiangiogenic therapy in a human colon cancer xenograft tumor model in mice...
  100. ncbi request reprint Molecular imaging of cardiovascular gene products
    Joseph C Wu
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5324, USA
    J Nucl Cardiol 11:491-505. 2004

Research Grants23

  1. Multimodality Imaging of Cell Mediated Gene Transfer
    Sanjiv Gambhir; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..Furthermore, the methodologies developed in this proposal will help other investigators to implement various models in which imaging of cell survival and cardiac gene therapy are important. ..
  2. Reporter Imaging of Protein-Protein Interactions
    Sanjiv Gambhir; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..More rapid methods to validate and translate pre-clinical models for cancer therapeutics into the clinic will likely result. ..
  3. Multimodality Imaging of Cell Mediated Gene Transfer
    Sanjiv Gambhir; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..Furthermore, the methodologies developed in this proposal will help other investigators to implement various models in which imaging of cell survival and cardiac gene therapy are important. ..
  4. Reporter Imaging of Protein-Protein Interactions
    Sanjiv Gambhir; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..More rapid methods to validate and translate pre-clinical models for cancer therapeutics into the clinic will likely result. ..
  5. Reporter Imaging of Protein-Protein Interactions
    Sanjiv Gambhir; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..More rapid methods to validate and translate pre-clinical models for cancer therapeutics into the clinic will likely result. ..
  6. Reporter Imaging of Protein-Protein Interactions
    Sanjiv Gambhir; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..More rapid methods to validate and translate pre-clinical models for cancer therapeutics into the clinic will likely result. ..
  7. Correlative Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis
    Sanjiv Gambhir; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..We plan to perform pharmacokinetics and toxicology studies with preclinical materials and prepare an agent for gamma and SPECT imaging in clinical studies and file an IRB for cancer angiogenesis evaluation. ..
  8. IMAGING REPORTER GENE EXPRESSION USING PET
    Sanjiv Gambhir; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..g., trials using suicide gene therapy to destroy brain tumors). ..
  9. Stanford Molecular Imaging Scholars (SMIS)
    Sanjiv Gambhir; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ....
  10. Imaging Cytolytic T Cells in Cancer Patients Using PET Reporter Genes/Reporter Pr
    Sanjiv S Gambhir; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Here, we propose non-invasive imaging of therapeutic immune cells that will be infused into patients with glioma brain tumors and have been shown to kill glioma brain tumor cells. ..
  11. Reporter Imaging of Protein-Protein Interactions
    Sanjiv S Gambhir; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..This will facilitate the discovery and validation of potential anti-tumor drug candidates for targeting these important protein-protein interactions in living subjects. ..
  12. IMAGING REPORTER GENE EXPRESSION USING PET
    Sanjiv Gambhir; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..g., trials using suicide gene therapy to destroy brain tumors). ..
  13. IMAGING REPORTER GENE EXPRESSION USING PET
    Sanjiv Gambhir; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ..g., trials using suicide gene therapy to destroy brain tumors). ..
  14. Multimodality Imaging of Cell Mediated Gene Transfer
    Sanjiv Gambhir; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Furthermore, the methodologies developed in this proposal will help other investigators to implement various models in which imaging of cell survival and cardiac gene therapy are important. ..
  15. Academy of Molecular Imaging 2006 Annual Meeting
    Sanjiv Gambhir; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..The annual conference is being held March 25-29, 2006 at the Gaylord Palms Resort Hotel and Convention Center in Orlando, Florida. ..
  16. Reporter Imaging of Protein-Protein Interactions
    Sanjiv Gambhir; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..More rapid methods to validate and translate pre-clinical models for cancer therapeutics into the clinic will likely result. ..
  17. Imaging Cytolytic T Cells in Cancer Patients Using PET Reporter Genes/Reporter Pr
    Sanjiv Gambhir; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..Here, we propose non-invasive imaging of therapeutic immune cells that will be infused into patients with glioma brain tumors and have been shown to kill glioma brain tumor cells. ..
  18. IMAGING REPORTER GENE EXPRESSION USING PET
    Sanjiv Gambhir; Fiscal Year: 1999
    ..g., trials using suicide gene therapy to destroy brain tumors). ..
  19. Reporter Imaging of Protein-Protein Interactions
    Sanjiv Gambhir; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..This will facilitate the discovery and validation of potential anti-tumor drug candidates for targeting these important protein-protein interactions in living subjects. ..