Scott Fendorf

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Spatial and temporal variations of groundwater arsenic in South and Southeast Asia
    Scott Fendorf
    Department of Earth System Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Science 328:1123-7. 2010
  2. ncbi request reprint Temporal changes in soil partitioning and bioaccessibility of arsenic, chromium, and lead
    Scott Fendorf
    Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 2115, USA
    J Environ Qual 33:2049-55. 2004
  3. ncbi request reprint Stability of uranium incorporated into Fe (hydr)oxides under fluctuating redox conditions
    Brandy D Stewart
    Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 43:4922-7. 2009
  4. ncbi request reprint In situ bioreduction of uranium (VI) to submicromolar levels and reoxidation by dissolved oxygen
    Wei Min Wu
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 41:5716-23. 2007
  5. ncbi request reprint Thermodynamic constraints on reductive reactions influencing the biogeochemistry of arsenic in soils and sediments
    Benjamin D Kocar
    Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 43:4871-7. 2009
  6. doi request reprint Near-surface wetland sediments as a source of arsenic release to ground water in Asia
    Matthew L Polizzotto
    School of Earth Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nature 454:505-8. 2008
  7. doi request reprint Impact of uranyl-calcium-carbonato complexes on uranium(VI) adsorption to synthetic and natural sediments
    Brandy D Stewart
    Environmental and Earth System Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 44:928-34. 2010
  8. ncbi request reprint Speciation-dependent microbial reduction of uranium within iron-coated sands
    Jim Neiss
    Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 41:7343-8. 2007
  9. pmc Processes conducive to the release and transport of arsenic into aquifers of Bangladesh
    Matthew L Polizzotto
    Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:18819-23. 2005
  10. pmc Intra-particle migration of mercury in granular polysulfide-rubber-coated activated carbon (PSR-AC)
    Eun Ah Kim
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 4020, United States
    Chemosphere 86:648-54. 2012

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications40

  1. doi request reprint Spatial and temporal variations of groundwater arsenic in South and Southeast Asia
    Scott Fendorf
    Department of Earth System Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Science 328:1123-7. 2010
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint Temporal changes in soil partitioning and bioaccessibility of arsenic, chromium, and lead
    Scott Fendorf
    Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 2115, USA
    J Environ Qual 33:2049-55. 2004
    ..They further reveal the importance of incubation time on the reactivity of such trace elements...
  3. ncbi request reprint Stability of uranium incorporated into Fe (hydr)oxides under fluctuating redox conditions
    Brandy D Stewart
    Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 43:4922-7. 2009
    ..Our results reveal that the fate of uranium is dependent on anaerobic/ aerobic conditions, aqueous uranium speciation, and the fate of iron...
  4. ncbi request reprint In situ bioreduction of uranium (VI) to submicromolar levels and reoxidation by dissolved oxygen
    Wei Min Wu
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 41:5716-23. 2007
    ..and Geobacter spp., in both sediment and groundwater. The dominant Fe(III)-reducing species were Geothrix spp...
  5. ncbi request reprint Thermodynamic constraints on reductive reactions influencing the biogeochemistry of arsenic in soils and sediments
    Benjamin D Kocar
    Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 43:4871-7. 2009
    ..Thus, on a thermodynamic basis, the general sequence of microbial reduction should be As(V) followed by Fe(III) or sulfate...
  6. doi request reprint Near-surface wetland sediments as a source of arsenic release to ground water in Asia
    Matthew L Polizzotto
    School of Earth Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nature 454:505-8. 2008
    ....
  7. doi request reprint Impact of uranyl-calcium-carbonato complexes on uranium(VI) adsorption to synthetic and natural sediments
    Brandy D Stewart
    Environmental and Earth System Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 44:928-34. 2010
    ..Our observations reveal that, in carbonate-bearing waters, neutral to slightly acidic pH values ( approximately 5) and limited dissolved calcium are optimal for uranium adsorption...
  8. ncbi request reprint Speciation-dependent microbial reduction of uranium within iron-coated sands
    Jim Neiss
    Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 41:7343-8. 2007
    ..Uranyl speciation, and in particular the formation of ternary Ca-UO2-CO3 complexes, has a profound impact on U(VI) reduction and thus transport within anaerobic systems...
  9. pmc Processes conducive to the release and transport of arsenic into aquifers of Bangladesh
    Matthew L Polizzotto
    Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:18819-23. 2005
    ....
  10. pmc Intra-particle migration of mercury in granular polysulfide-rubber-coated activated carbon (PSR-AC)
    Eun Ah Kim
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 4020, United States
    Chemosphere 86:648-54. 2012
    ..Both μ-XRF and mathematical modeling results suggest mercury removal occurs not only at the outer surface of the PSR-AC particle but also at some interior regions due to a large PSR surface area within an AC particle...
  11. pmc Changes in bacterial and archaeal community structure and functional diversity along a geochemically variable soil profile
    Colleen M Hansel
    Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 2115, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 74:1620-33. 2008
    ....
  12. ncbi request reprint Reductive processes controlling arsenic retention: revealing the relative importance of iron and arsenic reduction
    Katharine J Tufano
    School of Earth Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 42:8283-9. 2008
    ..Our results also suggest the importance of appreciating physical properties of specific Fe (hydr)oxides when predicting the potential for As desorption...
  13. doi request reprint Arsenic localization, speciation, and co-occurrence with iron on rice (Oryza sativa L.) roots having variable Fe coatings
    Angelia L Seyfferth
    Department of Environmental Earth Systems Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 44:8108-13. 2010
    ..Thus, Fe plaque does not directly intercept (and hence restrict) As supply to and uptake by rice roots but rather serves as a bulk scavenger of As predominantly near the root base...
  14. ncbi request reprint Confounding impacts of iron reduction on arsenic retention
    Katharine J Tufano
    School of Earth Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 42:4777-83. 2008
    ....
  15. ncbi request reprint Pilot-scale in situ bioremedation of uranium in a highly contaminated aquifer. 2. Reduction of u(VI) and geochemical control of u(VI) bioavailability
    Wei Min Wu
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 40:3986-95. 2006
    ..Changes in the sequence of carbonate and ethanol addition confirmed that carbonate-controlled desorption increased bioavailability of U(VI) for reduction...
  16. ncbi request reprint Thermodynamic constraints on the oxidation of biogenic UO2 by Fe(III) (Hydr)oxides
    Matthew Ginder-Vogel
    Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 40:3544-50. 2006
    ..Thus, our results demonstrate that the oxidation of UO2(biogenic) by Fe(III) (hydr)oxides may transpire under mildly reducing conditions when ferrihydrite is present...
  17. pmc Dehalogenation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and polychlorinated biphenyl by bimetallic, impregnated, and nanoscale zerovalent iron
    Yuan Zhuang
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 4020, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 45:4896-903. 2011
    ....
  18. doi request reprint Competitive microbially and Mn oxide mediated redox processes controlling arsenic speciation and partitioning
    Samantha C Ying
    Department of Environmental and Earth System Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, United States
    Environ Sci Technol 45:5572-9. 2011
    ....
  19. ncbi request reprint Arsenite retention mechanisms within estuarine sediments of Pescadero, CA
    Benjamin C Bostick
    Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 2115, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 38:3299-304. 2004
    ..Processes discerned in this study reveal the importance of sulfide minerals in As sequestration within anoxic environments...
  20. ncbi request reprint Competing Fe (II)-induced mineralization pathways of ferrihydrite
    Colleen M Hansel
    Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 39:7147-53. 2005
    ..g., lepidocrocite) that influence ensuing reaction pathways...
  21. doi request reprint Transport implications resulting from internal redistribution of arsenic and iron within constructed soil aggregates
    Yoko Masue-Slowey
    Department of Environmental Earth System Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States
    Environ Sci Technol 45:582-8. 2011
    ....
  22. ncbi request reprint Phosphate imposed limitations on biological reduction and alteration of ferrihydrite
    Thomas Borch
    Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 41:166-72. 2007
    ..Thus, deviations in iron (hydr)oxide reactivity with changes in surface composition, such as those noted here for phosphate, need to be considered within natural environments...
  23. ncbi request reprint Effect of uranium(VI) speciation on simultaneous microbial reduction of uranium(VI) and iron(III)
    Brandy D Stewart
    Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford Univ, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Environ Qual 40:90-7. 2011
    ..8 mM). The mathematical construct, implemented with the reactive transport code MIN3P, reveals predominant factors controlling rates and extent of uranium reduction in complex geochemical systems...
  24. doi request reprint Reduction of uranium(VI) by soluble iron(II) conforms with thermodynamic predictions
    Xin Du
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 45:4718-25. 2011
    ..Initiation of the reaction at a higher pH resulted in a higher final ratio of U(IV) to U(VI) at equilibrium...
  25. ncbi request reprint Contrasting effects of dissimilatory iron (III) and arsenic (V) reduction on arsenic retention and transport
    Benjamin D Kocar
    Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 40:6715-21. 2006
    ....
  26. doi request reprint Kinetic and mechanistic constraints on the oxidation of biogenic uraninite by ferrihydrite
    Matthew Ginder-Vogel
    Department of Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 44:163-9. 2010
    ..Thus, our results demonstrate that UO(2(bio)) oxidation by Fe(III) (hydr)oxides is controlled by the rate of uraninite dissolution and that this process may limit uranium(IV) sequestration in the presence of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides...
  27. ncbi request reprint Chromate reduction and retention processes within arid subsurface environments
    Matthew Ginder-Vogel
    Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 39:7833-9. 2005
    ..Thus, mineral reactivity is limited within this arid environment and appreciable reduction of Cr(VI) is restricted to highly alkaline conditions resulting near leaking radioactive waste disposal tanks...
  28. ncbi request reprint Quantifying constraints imposed by calcium and iron on bacterial reduction of uranium(VI)
    Brandy D Stewart
    Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Environ Qual 36:363-72. 2007
    ..The quantitative framework described herein helps to predict the fate and transport of uranium within anaerobic environments...
  29. ncbi request reprint Heterogeneous response to biostimulation for U(VI) reduction in replicated sediment microcosms
    Jennifer L Nyman
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, M42 Terman Engineering Center, Stanford University, 380 Panama Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 4020, USA
    Biodegradation 17:303-16. 2006
    ..These observations underscore the importance of effective chemical delivery and the role of serial and parallel processes in uranium reduction...
  30. doi request reprint Microbial and metal water quality in rain catchments compared with traditional drinking water sources in the East Sepik Province, Papua New Guinea
    Helena M Horak
    School of Medicine, Stanford University, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Water Health 8:126-38. 2010
    ..Individuals in villages using Sepik River water as their primary water source had significantly higher incidence of diarrhoea than those primarily using other water sources (streams, dug wells and catchments)...
  31. pmc Genesis of hexavalent chromium from natural sources in soil and groundwater
    Christopher Oze
    Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 2115, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:6544-9. 2007
    ..Our results demonstrate that Cr(III) within ultramafic- and serpentinite-derived soils/sediments can be oxidized and dissolved through natural processes, leading to hazardous levels of aqueous Cr(VI) in surface and groundwater...
  32. ncbi request reprint Reductive dissolution and biomineralization of iron hydroxide under dynamic flow conditions
    Shawn G Benner
    Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, California 94305 2115, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 36:1705-11. 2002
    ..These results highlight the importance of coupled flow and water chemistry in controlling the rate and solid-phase products of iron (hydr)oxide reduction...
  33. doi request reprint Immobilization of Hg(II) in water with polysulfide-rubber (PSR) polymer-coated activated carbon
    Eun Ah Kim
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 4020, USA
    Water Res 45:453-60. 2011
    ..The pH effect on mercury removal and adsorption isotherm results indicate competition between protons and mercury for binding to sulfur at low pH...
  34. ncbi request reprint Differential adsorption of molybdate and tetrathiomolybdate on pyrite (FeS2)
    Benjamin C Bostick
    Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 2115, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 37:285-91. 2003
    ....
  35. ncbi request reprint Kinetics and structural constraints of chromate reduction by green rusts
    Deborah L Bond
    Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 2115, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 37:2750-7. 2003
    ..The mole fraction of Fe(III) in the Cr(x),Fe(1-x)(OH)3 x nH2O reaction product ranged from 17% to 68%, leading to a highly stabilized (low solubility) phase...
  36. ncbi request reprint Spatial and temporal association of As and Fe species on aquatic plant roots
    Colleen M Hansel
    Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, California 94305, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 36:1988-94. 2002
    ..Root surface-associated As generally corresponds to regions of enhanced Fe levels and may therefore occur as a direct consequence of Fe phase heterogeneity and preferential As sorption reactions...
  37. ncbi request reprint Bioreduction of uranium in a contaminated soil column
    Baohua Gu
    Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P O Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 39:4841-7. 2005
    ....
  38. ncbi request reprint Reduction of Cr(VI) under acidic conditions by the facultative Fe(lll)-reducing bacterium Acidiphilium cryptum
    David E Cummings
    Biotechnology Department, The Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415, Department of Biology, Point Loma Nazarene University, San Diego, California 92106, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 41:146-52. 2007
    ..cryptum. We speculate, rather, that Cr(VI) reduction is used here as a detoxification mechanism...
  39. ncbi request reprint Metal(loid) diagenesis in mine-impacted sediments of Lake Coeur d'Alene, Idaho
    Gordon R Toevs
    Soil and Land Resources Division, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho 83844 2339, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 40:2537-43. 2006
    ..Diagenetic reactions create chemical gradients encouraging the diffusion of metal(loids) toward the sediment--water interface, thereby, increasing the potential for release into the overlying water...
  40. ncbi request reprint Inhibition of bacterial U(VI) reduction by calcium
    Scott C Brooks
    Environmental Sciences Division, P O Box 2008, MS 6038, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 6038, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 37:1850-8. 2003
    ..The results do not support Ca inhibition caused by direct interactions with the cells or with the electron donor as the reduction of fumarate or Tc(VII)O4- under identical conditions was unaffected by the presence of Ca...