Emily M Drabant

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Experiential, autonomic, and neural responses during threat anticipation vary as a function of threat intensity and neuroticism
    Emily M Drabant
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroimage 55:401-10. 2011
  2. pmc Neural mechanisms underlying 5-HTTLPR-related sensitivity to acute stress
    Emily M Drabant
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Am J Psychiatry 169:397-405. 2012
  3. pmc Emotion regulation and brain plasticity: expressive suppression use predicts anterior insula volume
    Nicole R Giuliani
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Neuroimage 58:10-5. 2011
  4. pmc For better or worse? Stress inoculation effects for implicit but not explicit anxiety
    Michael D Edge
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Depress Anxiety 26:831-7. 2009
  5. pmc Healthy young women with serotonin transporter SS polymorphism show a pro-inflammatory bias under resting and stress conditions
    Carolyn A Fredericks
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Brain Behav Immun 24:350-7. 2010
  6. pmc Anterior cingulate cortex volume and emotion regulation: is bigger better?
    Nicole R Giuliani
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Biol Psychol 86:379-82. 2011
  7. pmc Individual differences in typical reappraisal use predict amygdala and prefrontal responses
    Emily M Drabant
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 65:367-73. 2009

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications7

  1. pmc Experiential, autonomic, and neural responses during threat anticipation vary as a function of threat intensity and neuroticism
    Emily M Drabant
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroimage 55:401-10. 2011
    ....
  2. pmc Neural mechanisms underlying 5-HTTLPR-related sensitivity to acute stress
    Emily M Drabant
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Am J Psychiatry 169:397-405. 2012
    ....
  3. pmc Emotion regulation and brain plasticity: expressive suppression use predicts anterior insula volume
    Nicole R Giuliani
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Neuroimage 58:10-5. 2011
    ..These findings are consistent with the idea that trait patterns of emotion processing are related to brain structure...
  4. pmc For better or worse? Stress inoculation effects for implicit but not explicit anxiety
    Michael D Edge
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Depress Anxiety 26:831-7. 2009
    ..low) ELS is associated with greater self-reported anxiety. This study tested the hypothesis that stress inoculation effects are evident for implicit (nonconscious) but not explicit (conscious) aspects of anxiety...
  5. pmc Healthy young women with serotonin transporter SS polymorphism show a pro-inflammatory bias under resting and stress conditions
    Carolyn A Fredericks
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Brain Behav Immun 24:350-7. 2010
    ....
  6. pmc Anterior cingulate cortex volume and emotion regulation: is bigger better?
    Nicole R Giuliani
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Biol Psychol 86:379-82. 2011
    ..Expressive suppression, negative affect, and age were not related to dACC volume. These findings indicate that individual differences in cognitive reappraisal are related to individual differences in dACC volume in healthy participants...
  7. pmc Individual differences in typical reappraisal use predict amygdala and prefrontal responses
    Emily M Drabant
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 65:367-73. 2009
    ..Such spontaneous emotion regulation might play an important role in normal and pathological responses to the emotional challenges of everyday life...