M M Davis

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Dynamics of cell surface molecules during T cell recognition
    Mark M Davis
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5323, USA
    Annu Rev Biochem 72:717-42. 2003
  2. ncbi request reprint Blimp-1 over Budapest
    Mark M Davis
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Immunol 8:445-7. 2007
  3. ncbi request reprint A new trigger for T cells
    Mark M Davis
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Cell 110:285-7. 2002
  4. ncbi request reprint The evolutionary and structural 'logic' of antigen receptor diversity
    Mark M Davis
    The Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, The Howard Hughes Medical Institute, 279 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5323, USA
    Semin Immunol 16:239-43. 2004
  5. ncbi request reprint Ligand recognition by alpha beta T cell receptors
    M M Davis
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Immunol 16:523-44. 1998
  6. pmc Quantitative analysis of hepatitis C virus-specific CD8(+) T cells in peripheral blood and liver using peptide-MHC tetramers
    X S He
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 96:5692-7. 1999
  7. ncbi request reprint Differential clustering of CD4 and CD3zeta during T cell recognition
    M F Krummel
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Science 289:1349-52. 2000
  8. ncbi request reprint Frequency of class I HLA-restricted anti-HIV CD8+ T cells in individuals receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)
    C M Gray
    Center for AIDS Research, Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305
    J Immunol 162:1780-8. 1999
  9. pmc The vav exchange factor is an essential regulator in actin-dependent receptor translocation to the lymphocyte-antigen-presenting cell interface
    C Wulfing
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 97:10150-5. 2000
  10. ncbi request reprint The nature of major histocompatibility complex recognition by gamma delta T cells
    H Schild
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305
    Cell 76:29-37. 1994

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications73

  1. ncbi request reprint Dynamics of cell surface molecules during T cell recognition
    Mark M Davis
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5323, USA
    Annu Rev Biochem 72:717-42. 2003
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint Blimp-1 over Budapest
    Mark M Davis
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Immunol 8:445-7. 2007
    ..Recent work confirmed its role in the maturation of B cells into immunoglobulin-secreting plasmablasts, as well as in the control of T cell homeostasis and tolerance. What follows is a short history of how Blimp-1 was discovered...
  3. ncbi request reprint A new trigger for T cells
    Mark M Davis
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Cell 110:285-7. 2002
    ..A recent study has described a new trigger for T cell activation, involving a TCR-ligand-induced conformational change in CD3epsilon that permits binding of the adaptor protein Nck...
  4. ncbi request reprint The evolutionary and structural 'logic' of antigen receptor diversity
    Mark M Davis
    The Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, The Howard Hughes Medical Institute, 279 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5323, USA
    Semin Immunol 16:239-43. 2004
    ..Thus, the wide variations seen in V region repertoires amongst vertebrates is likely to be of lesser importance than the preservation of one or more diverse CDR3 regions...
  5. ncbi request reprint Ligand recognition by alpha beta T cell receptors
    M M Davis
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Immunol 16:523-44. 1998
    ..We conclude with an analysis of the highly diverse CDR3 loops found in all antigen receptor molecules and suggest that such regions form the core of both TCR and antibody specificity...
  6. pmc Quantitative analysis of hepatitis C virus-specific CD8(+) T cells in peripheral blood and liver using peptide-MHC tetramers
    X S He
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 96:5692-7. 1999
    ..Direct quantitation and characterization of HCV-specific CTLs should extend our understanding of the immunopathogenesis and the mechanism of clearance or persistence of HCV...
  7. ncbi request reprint Differential clustering of CD4 and CD3zeta during T cell recognition
    M F Krummel
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Science 289:1349-52. 2000
    ..Thus, the CD4 coreceptor may serve primarily to "boost" recognition of ligand by the TCR and may not be required once activation has been initiated...
  8. ncbi request reprint Frequency of class I HLA-restricted anti-HIV CD8+ T cells in individuals receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)
    C M Gray
    Center for AIDS Research, Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305
    J Immunol 162:1780-8. 1999
    ..In conclusion, this study provides evidence that persistently replicating viral populations are probably required to maintain high frequencies of HIV-1 epitope-specific CD8+ T cells in asymptomatic chronically infected individuals..
  9. pmc The vav exchange factor is an essential regulator in actin-dependent receptor translocation to the lymphocyte-antigen-presenting cell interface
    C Wulfing
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 97:10150-5. 2000
    ..These data indicate that vav is an essential regulator of cytoskeletal rearrangements during T cell activation...
  10. ncbi request reprint The nature of major histocompatibility complex recognition by gamma delta T cells
    H Schild
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305
    Cell 76:29-37. 1994
    ..These results suggest that the molecular nature of gamma delta T cell recognition is fundamentally different than that of alpha beta T cells...
  11. pmc Attributes of gammadelta intraepithelial lymphocytes as suggested by their transcriptional profile
    A M Fahrer
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98:10261-6. 2001
    ..This study provides a strong basis for further investigations of the roles of these cells as well as mucosal immune defense in general...
  12. ncbi request reprint Blimp-1, a novel zinc finger-containing protein that can drive the maturation of B lymphocytes into immunoglobulin-secreting cells
    C A Turner
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5428
    Cell 77:297-306. 1994
    ..Thus, Blimp-1 appears to be a pleiotropic regulatory factor capable of at least partially driving the terminal differentiation of B cells...
  13. ncbi request reprint Direct functional analysis of epitope-specific CD8+ T cells in peripheral blood
    X S He
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5187, USA
    Viral Immunol 14:59-69. 2001
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint A range of CD4 T cell tolerance: partial inactivation to organ-specific antigen allows nondestructive thyroiditis or insulitis
    S Akkaraju
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Beckman Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5428, USA
    Immunity 7:255-71. 1997
    ....
  15. ncbi request reprint Determination of the relationship between T cell responsiveness and the number of MHC-peptide complexes using specific monoclonal antibodies
    P A Reay
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Immunol 164:5626-34. 2000
    ..The analysis indicates that T cell activation is a stochastic process...
  16. ncbi request reprint Evidence that structural rearrangements and/or flexibility during TCR binding can contribute to T cell activation
    Michelle Krogsgaard
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Cell 12:1367-78. 2003
    ..Structural analysis shows significant changes in the central TCR contact residue of the peptide-MHC, indicating that structural rearrangements within the TCR-peptide-MHC interface can contribute to T cell activation...
  17. pmc Detection and characterization of cellular immune responses using peptide-MHC microarrays
    Yoav Soen
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS Biol 1:E65. 2003
    ....
  18. ncbi request reprint A kinetic window constricts the T cell receptor repertoire in the thymus
    P A Savage
    Program in Cancer Biology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Immunity 14:243-52. 2001
    ..These studies provide direct evidence that thymic selection biases the naive peripheral T cell repertoire toward TCR-ligand interactions that fall within a moderate half-life "window."..
  19. ncbi request reprint The adult T-cell receptor delta-chain is diverse and distinct from that of fetal thymocytes
    J F Elliott
    Department of Medical Microbiology, Stanford University, California 94305
    Nature 331:627-31. 1988
    ....
  20. ncbi request reprint T cells as a self-referential, sensory organ
    Mark M Davis
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Immunol 25:681-95. 2007
    ..With the multitude of specificities available to most T cells, they can thus be considered as a sensory organ, trained on self-peptide-MHCs and primed to detect nonself...
  21. pmc An endogenous positively selecting peptide enhances mature T cell responses and becomes an autoantigen in the absence of microRNA miR-181a
    Peter J R Ebert
    The Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Nat Immunol 10:1162-9. 2009
    ..Therefore, miR-181a helps to guarantee the clonal deletion of particular moderate-affinity clones by modulating the TCR signaling threshold of thymocytes...
  22. ncbi request reprint Modular nature of Blimp-1 in the regulation of gene expression during B cell maturation
    Roger Sciammas
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Immunol 172:5427-40. 2004
    ..Furthermore, mutagenesis of Blimp-1 reveals multiple effector domains, which regulate distinct genes. This indicates that Blimp-1 subdivides the maturation program into select and tunable pathways...
  23. ncbi request reprint CD4 enhances T cell sensitivity to antigen by coordinating Lck accumulation at the immunological synapse
    Qi jing Li
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Immunol 5:791-9. 2004
    ..We also discuss broader implications for T cell biology, including thymic selection, diversity of the repertoire of self pMHC molecules and serial triggering...
  24. ncbi request reprint The alphabeta T cell repertoire comes into focus
    Mark M Davis
    The Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Immunity 27:179-80. 2007
    ..Moon et al. (2007) report the enumeration and isolation of naive CD4(+) T cells and show their numbers could predict the size and diversity of the primary immune response...
  25. pmc A prescription for human immunology
    Mark M Davis
    The Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Immunity 29:835-8. 2008
    ..Thus, to maximize the use of immunologic approaches to improve human health, we need more strategically directed efforts in human immunology. This would also open up new opportunities for basic research...
  26. ncbi request reprint miR-181a is an intrinsic modulator of T cell sensitivity and selection
    Qi jing Li
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Cell 129:147-61. 2007
    ..Importantly, higher miR-181a expression correlates with greater T cell sensitivity in immature T cells, suggesting that miR-181a acts as an intrinsic antigen sensitivity "rheostat" during T cell development...
  27. pmc Altered peptide ligand vaccination with Flt3 ligand expanded dendritic cells for tumor immunotherapy
    L Fong
    Departments of Pathology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98:8809-14. 2001
    ..Clinical response correlated with the expansion of CD8 tetramer(+) T cells, confirming the role of CD8 T cells in this treatment strategy...
  28. ncbi request reprint Identification and sequence of a fourth human T cell antigen receptor chain
    E Y Loh
    Department of Medical Microbiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305
    Nature 330:569-72. 1987
    ....
  29. ncbi request reprint How T cells 'see' antigen
    Michelle Krogsgaard
    The Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Immunol 6:239-45. 2005
    ..Here we summarize some of the more recent work on alphabeta T cell receptor recognition and discuss the implications for activation...
  30. ncbi request reprint Costimulation and endogenous MHC ligands contribute to T cell recognition
    Christoph Wulfing
    The Howard Hughes Medical Institute and The Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Nat Immunol 3:42-7. 2002
    ..Thus, low-affinity ligands can contribute to synapse formation and T cell signaling...
  31. pmc T cell receptor antagonism interferes with MHC clustering and integrin patterning during immunological synapse formation
    Cenk Sumen
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Cell Biol 166:579-90. 2004
    ..Hence, antagonist peptides selectively disable MHC clustering and the stop signal, whereas LFA-1 valency up-regulation occurs normally...
  32. ncbi request reprint Two-step binding mechanism for T-cell receptor recognition of peptide MHC
    Lawren C Wu
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, B221 Beckman Center, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nature 418:552-6. 2002
    ....
  33. ncbi request reprint Imaging synapse formation during thymocyte selection: inability of CD3zeta to form a stable central accumulation during negative selection
    Lauren I Richie
    Program in Immunology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Immunity 16:595-606. 2002
    ..This implicates differences in synapse geometry in initiation of alternate signals downstream of the TCR...
  34. pmc Peptide-MHC heterodimers show that thymic positive selection requires a more restricted set of self-peptides than negative selection
    Jeremy Juang
    The Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Exp Med 207:1223-34. 2010
    ..Thus, both positive and negative selection can be driven by dimeric but not monomeric ligands. In addition, positive selection has much more stringent requirements for the partner self-pMHC...
  35. pmc TCR and Lat are expressed on separate protein islands on T cell membranes and concatenate during activation
    Björn F Lillemeier
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Nat Immunol 11:90-6. 2010
    ..This separation versus physical juxtapositioning of receptor domains and domains containing downstream signaling molecules in quiescent versus activated T cells may be a general feature of plasma membrane-associated signal transduction...
  36. ncbi request reprint Linking molecular and cellular events in T-cell activation and synapse formation
    Michelle Krogsgaard
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5323, USA
    Semin Immunol 15:307-15. 2003
    ..Ultimately, we want to integrate these cellular aspects of T-cell recognition with key features of the molecular interactions that drive specific events...
  37. pmc Thymic selection determines gammadelta T cell effector fate: antigen-naive cells make interleukin-17 and antigen-experienced cells make interferon gamma
    Kirk D C Jensen
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Immunity 29:90-100. 2008
    ..The swift IL-17 response mounted by antigen-naive gammadelta T cells suggests a critical role for these cells at the onset of an acute inflammatory response to novel antigens...
  38. ncbi request reprint Direct observation of ligand recognition by T cells
    Darrell J Irvine
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nature 419:845-9. 2002
    ..This sensitivity is highly dependent on CD4, because blocking this molecule with antibodies renders T cells unable to detect less than about 30 ligands...
  39. pmc Quantifying signaling-induced reorientation of T cell receptors during immunological synapse formation
    William C Moss
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99:15024-9. 2002
    ..This method should permit the quantitation of other dynamic membrane events and the associated movement of cell-surface molecules...
  40. ncbi request reprint Linker for activation of T cells, zeta-associated protein-70, and Src homology 2 domain-containing leukocyte protein-76 are required for TCR-induced microtubule-organizing center polarization
    Michelle R Kuhne
    Department of Medicine, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Rosalind Russell Center for Medical Research in Arthritis, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    J Immunol 171:860-6. 2003
    ..Moreover, our studies revealed that a calcium-dependent event not requiring calcineurin or calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase is required for TCR-induced polarization of the MTOC...
  41. pmc Low ligand requirement for deletion and lack of synapses in positive selection enforce the gauntlet of thymic T cell maturation
    Peter J R Ebert
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Immunity 29:734-45. 2008
    ....
  42. pmc Resting and anergic B cells are defective in CD28-dependent costimulation of naive CD4+ T cells
    W Y Ho
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305
    J Exp Med 179:1539-49. 1994
    ....
  43. ncbi request reprint Spatial and temporal dynamics of T cell receptor signaling with a photoactivatable agonist
    Morgan Huse
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Immunity 27:76-88. 2007
    ..These results establish the speed and localization of early signaling steps, and have important implications regarding the overall structure of the network...
  44. ncbi request reprint Molecular and functional analysis using live cell microarrays
    Daniel S Chen
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Curr Opin Chem Biol 10:28-34. 2006
    ..This review focuses on the use of cellular microarrays to detect antigen-specific T cells and their responsiveness, analyze cancer cell types and behavior and to investigate the control of stem cell differentiation...
  45. ncbi request reprint Dynamics of p56lck translocation to the T cell immunological synapse following agonist and antagonist stimulation
    Lauren I Richie Ehrlich
    Program in Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Immunity 17:809-22. 2002
    ..Most surprisingly, we find an intracellular pool of lck associated with recycling endosomes that translocates to mature synapses within 10 min of calcium flux. This bolus of lck may contribute to intermediate-late signal transduction...
  46. ncbi request reprint Agonist/endogenous peptide-MHC heterodimers drive T cell activation and sensitivity
    Michelle Krogsgaard
    The Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nature 434:238-43. 2005
    ....
  47. pmc Quantitative imaging of lymphocyte membrane protein reorganization and signaling
    Peter M Kasson
    Biophysics Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Biophys J 88:579-89. 2005
    ..Our methods can be generalized to a range of cell-signaling phenomena and enable novel applications not feasible with single-particle studies, such as analysis of subcellular protein localization in live organ culture...
  48. pmc A blood-borne antigen induces rapid T-B cell contact: a potential mechanism for tolerance induction
    Ines Gütgemann
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Immunology 107:420-5. 2002
    ..In addition, B cells gain the ability to present antigen. Our results suggest a way for T cells to be stimulated by blood-borne antigen presented by naïve B cells, a potential mechanism of tolerance induction...
  49. pmc Evidence for a functional sidedness to the alphabetaTCR
    Michael S Kuhns
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate Program in Immunology, The Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:5094-9. 2010
    ..These data reveal a "functional-sidedness" to the alphabetaTCR constant region, with dimerization occurring on the side of the TCR opposite from where the CD3 heterodimers are located...
  50. ncbi request reprint Continuous T cell receptor signaling required for synapse maintenance and full effector potential
    Johannes B Huppa
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Beckman Center B221, 279 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Immunol 4:749-55. 2003
    ..Thus TCR signaling persists for hours, has a cumulative effect and is necessary for the maintenance of the immunological synapse...
  51. pmc TCR-peptide-MHC interactions in situ show accelerated kinetics and increased affinity
    Johannes B Huppa
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford School of Medicine, California 94305 5323, USA
    Nature 463:963-7. 2010
    ..However, CD4 blockade had no effect on the synaptic TCR affinity, nor did it destabilize TCR-pMHC complexes, indicating that the TCR binds pMHC independently of CD4...
  52. ncbi request reprint A human T cell-specific molecule is a member of a new gene family
    T J Schall
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305
    J Immunol 141:1018-25. 1988
    ..There is significant homology between the RANTES sequence and several other T cell genes, suggesting that they comprise a previously undescribed family of small T cell molecules...
  53. doi request reprint Functional development of the T cell receptor for antigen
    Peter J R Ebert
    The Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Prog Mol Biol Transl Sci 92:65-100. 2010
    ..Here, we discuss our recent findings relating to T cell antigen recognition and how this leads to the thymic development of foreign-antigen-responsive alphabetaT cells...
  54. pmc Isolating highly enriched populations of circulating epithelial cells and other rare cells from blood using a magnetic sweeper device
    AmirAli H Talasaz
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:3970-5. 2009
    ..In contrast, we could not find any circulating epithelial cells in samples from 5 healthy donors. The isolated CEpCs are all stored individually for further molecular analysis...
  55. ncbi request reprint Disruption of extracellular interactions impairs T cell receptor-CD3 complex stability and signaling
    Michael S Kuhns
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Immunity 26:357-69. 2007
    ..These data demonstrate that extracellular TCR-CD3 subunit interactions contribute to the structural integrity and function of this multisubunit receptor...
  56. pmc The safety on the TCR trigger
    Michael S Kuhns
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Cell 135:594-6. 2008
    ..Prior to activation, basic residues in the cytoplasmic domain of the signaling subunits of the T cell receptor associate with the plasma membrane such that the key signaling tyrosines are sequestered in the bilayer...
  57. ncbi request reprint T-cell-antigen recognition and the immunological synapse
    Johannes B Huppa
    The Howard Hughes Medical Institute and The Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Rev Immunol 3:973-83. 2003
  58. ncbi request reprint A hybrid machine-learning approach for segmentation of protein localization data
    Peter M Kasson
    Biophysics Program, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Bioinformatics 21:3778-86. 2005
    ....
  59. ncbi request reprint Deconstructing the form and function of the TCR/CD3 complex
    Michael S Kuhns
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Immunity 24:133-9. 2006
    ..Here, we review the current state of our understanding of the structure and organization of the TCR/CD3 complex...
  60. ncbi request reprint T cell killing does not require the formation of a stable mature immunological synapse
    Marco A Purbhoo
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Immunol 5:524-30. 2004
    ..Furthermore, only three pMHC complexes were required for killing, showing that stable synapse formation and complete signaling are not required for cytotoxicity...
  61. pmc Plasma membrane-associated proteins are clustered into islands attached to the cytoskeleton
    Björn F Lillemeier
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:18992-7. 2006
    ..Abundant actin staining and inhibitor studies show that these structures are connected to the cytoskeleton and at least partially depend on it for their formation and/or maintenance...
  62. pmc Immunosuppressive therapy mitigates immunological rejection of human embryonic stem cell xenografts
    Rutger Jan Swijnenburg
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:12991-6. 2008
    ..This process can be mitigated by a combined immunosuppressive regimen as assessed by molecular imaging approaches...
  63. pmc Restricted islet-cell reactive T cell repertoire of early pancreatic islet infiltrates in NOD mice
    Felix J Baker
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99:9374-9. 2002
    ..Thus, autoimmune diabetes in NOD may be initiated by a limited number of antigens distinct from GAD65 and insulin...
  64. pmc Cell type-specific gene expression differences in complex tissues
    Shai S Shen-Orr
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Nat Methods 7:287-9. 2010
    ....
  65. doi request reprint MHC-peptide tetramers to visualize antigen-specific T cells
    John D Altman
    Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
    Curr Protoc Immunol . 2003
    ....
  66. pmc A large T cell invagination with CD2 enrichment resets receptor engagement in the immunological synapse
    Kentner Singleton
    Center for Immunology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390, USA
    J Immunol 177:4402-13. 2006
    ..Based on this characterization, we speculate that the T cell invagination, aided by CD2 enrichment, internalizes parts of the TCR signaling machinery to reset T cell signaling upon agonist-mediated, stable APC contact...
  67. pmc A role for "self" in T-cell activation
    Michelle Krogsgaard
    Department of Pathology and NYU Cancer Institute, NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA
    Semin Immunol 19:236-44. 2007
    ..Here, we highlight recent experimental data that provides insights into the initiation of T-cell activation and also discuss the main controversies and uncertainties in this area...
  68. pmc Shouts, whispers and the kiss of death: directional secretion in T cells
    Morgan Huse
    Immunology Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA
    Nat Immunol 9:1105-11. 2008
    ..Thus, the mode of secretion seems to be tailored to the intended function of the secreted molecule...
  69. ncbi request reprint The zinc finger transcriptional repressor Blimp1/Prdm1 is dispensable for early axis formation but is required for specification of primordial germ cells in the mouse
    Stephane D Vincent
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
    Development 132:1315-25. 2005
    ..Thus Blimp1 probably acts to turn off the default pathway that allows epiblast cells to adopt a somatic cell fate, and shifts the transcriptional program so that they become exclusively allocated into the germ cell lineage...
  70. ncbi request reprint Distinct molecular mechanisms account for the specificity of two different T-cell receptors
    Nadja Anikeeva
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology and Kimmel Cancer Institute, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107, USA
    Biochemistry 42:4709-16. 2003
    ..The use of these different mechanisms by TCRs to recognize ligands might be an important means augmenting their inherent cross-reactivity...
  71. ncbi request reprint A single class II myosin modulates T cell motility and stopping, but not synapse formation
    Jordan Jacobelli
    Department of Pathology, University of California at San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Ave, San Francisco, California 93143, USA
    Nat Immunol 5:531-8. 2004
    ..Phosphorylation of MyH9 in its multimerization domain by T cell receptor-generated signals indicates that inactivation of this motor may be a key step in the 'stop' response during antigen recognition...
  72. pmc Molecular flexibility can influence the stimulatory ability of receptor-ligand interactions at cell-cell junctions
    Shuyan Qi
    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:4416-21. 2006
    ....
  73. ncbi request reprint Dynamics of the immunological synapse: finding, establishing and solidifying a connection
    Matthew F Krummel
    Department of Pathology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143 0511, USA
    Curr Opin Immunol 14:66-74. 2002
    ..This unexpected level of complexity of co-clustering and exclusion in the interface has generated much interest in the functional consequences of signaling and/or immune effector function...