Jeffrey C Cooper

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Valence and salience contribute to nucleus accumbens activation
    Jeffrey C Cooper
    Department of Psychology, Jordan Hall, 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroimage 39:538-47. 2008
  2. pmc Available alternative incentives modulate anticipatory nucleus accumbens activation
    Jeffrey C Cooper
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Jordan Hall, 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci 4:409-16. 2009
  3. pmc Bottom-up and top-down processes in emotion generation: common and distinct neural mechanisms
    Kevin N Ochsner
    Department of Psychology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA
    Psychol Sci 20:1322-31. 2009
  4. doi request reprint Neural systems supporting the control of affective and cognitive conflicts
    Kevin N Ochsner
    Department of Psychology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 21:1842-55. 2009
  5. ncbi request reprint Individual differences in trait rumination and the neural systems supporting cognitive reappraisal
    Rebecca D Ray
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Building 420, Stanford, CA 94305 2130, USA
    Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci 5:156-68. 2005
  6. ncbi request reprint The neural correlates of direct and reflected self-knowledge
    Kevin N Ochsner
    Department of Psychology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA
    Neuroimage 28:797-814. 2005
  7. ncbi request reprint Functional magnetic resonance imaging of reward prediction
    Brian Knutson
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Curr Opin Neurol 18:411-7. 2005
  8. pmc When giving is good: ventromedial prefrontal cortex activation for others' intentions
    Jeffrey C Cooper
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuron 67:511-21. 2010
  9. ncbi request reprint For better or for worse: neural systems supporting the cognitive down- and up-regulation of negative emotion
    Kevin N Ochsner
    Department of Psychology, Columbia University, 369 Schermerhorn Hall, New York, NY 10027, USA
    Neuroimage 23:483-99. 2004
  10. ncbi request reprint Comparison of spiral-in/out and spiral-out BOLD fMRI at 1.5 and 3 T
    Alison R Preston
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroimage 21:291-301. 2004

Detail Information

Publications11

  1. pmc Valence and salience contribute to nucleus accumbens activation
    Jeffrey C Cooper
    Department of Psychology, Jordan Hall, 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroimage 39:538-47. 2008
    ..These findings suggest that NAcc activation separately represents both valence and salience, consistent with its hypothesized role in appetitive motivation...
  2. pmc Available alternative incentives modulate anticipatory nucleus accumbens activation
    Jeffrey C Cooper
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Jordan Hall, 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci 4:409-16. 2009
    ..These findings imply that NAcc activation represents anticipated incentive value relative to the current context of available alternative gains and losses...
  3. pmc Bottom-up and top-down processes in emotion generation: common and distinct neural mechanisms
    Kevin N Ochsner
    Department of Psychology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA
    Psychol Sci 20:1322-31. 2009
    ..These findings provide a neural foundation for emotion theories that posit multiple kinds of appraisal processes and help to clarify mechanisms underlying clinically relevant forms of emotion dysregulation...
  4. doi request reprint Neural systems supporting the control of affective and cognitive conflicts
    Kevin N Ochsner
    Department of Psychology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 21:1842-55. 2009
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Individual differences in trait rumination and the neural systems supporting cognitive reappraisal
    Rebecca D Ray
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Building 420, Stanford, CA 94305 2130, USA
    Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci 5:156-68. 2005
    ..These findings clarify relations between rumination and emotion regulation processes and may have important implications for mood and anxiety disorders...
  6. ncbi request reprint The neural correlates of direct and reflected self-knowledge
    Kevin N Ochsner
    Department of Psychology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA
    Neuroimage 28:797-814. 2005
    ..These results support models suggesting that MPFC mediates meta-cognitive processes that may be recruited for direct and reflected self appraisals depending upon the demands of a specific task...
  7. ncbi request reprint Functional magnetic resonance imaging of reward prediction
    Brian Knutson
    Psychology Department, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Curr Opin Neurol 18:411-7. 2005
    ....
  8. pmc When giving is good: ventromedial prefrontal cortex activation for others' intentions
    Jeffrey C Cooper
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuron 67:511-21. 2010
    ..These results demonstrate that neural responses to others' generosity or selfishness depend not only on their actions but also on their perceived intentions...
  9. ncbi request reprint For better or for worse: neural systems supporting the cognitive down- and up-regulation of negative emotion
    Kevin N Ochsner
    Department of Psychology, Columbia University, 369 Schermerhorn Hall, New York, NY 10027, USA
    Neuroimage 23:483-99. 2004
    ....
  10. ncbi request reprint Comparison of spiral-in/out and spiral-out BOLD fMRI at 1.5 and 3 T
    Alison R Preston
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroimage 21:291-301. 2004
    ..It is concluded the spiral-in/out sequence may provide significant advantages over conventional spiral methods, especially at 3 T...
  11. ncbi request reprint The lure of the unknown
    Brian Knutson
    Department of Psychology, Stanford University
    Neuron 51:280-2. 2006
    ..These findings indicate that midbrain regions preferentially respond to novelty and suggest that novelty can serve as its own reward...