Christopher Contag

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Sustained release of drugs dispersed in polymer nanoparticles
    Gunilla B Jacobson
    Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, 333 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5080, USA
    Angew Chem Int Ed Engl 47:7880-2. 2008
  2. ncbi request reprint Molecular imaging using visible light to reveal biological changes in the brain
    Christopher H Contag
    Departments of Pediatrics, Microbiology and Immunology and Radiology, E150 Clark Center, MC 5427, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroimaging Clin N Am 16:633-54, ix. 2006
  3. pmc Heme oxygenase-1 deletion affects stress erythropoiesis
    Yu An Cao
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e20634. 2011
  4. pmc Role of nitric oxide in Salmonella typhimurium-mediated cancer cell killing
    Yoram Barak
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Sherman Fairchild Science Building, Stanford University School of Medicine, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    BMC Cancer 10:146. 2010
  5. ncbi request reprint In vivo pathology: seeing with molecular specificity and cellular resolution in the living body
    Christopher H Contag
    Department of Pediatrics, Radiology, and Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Pathol 2:277-305. 2007
  6. ncbi request reprint Effects of metalloporphyrins on heme oxygenase-1 transcription: correlative cell culture assays guide in vivo imaging
    Monica Hajdena-Dawson
    Stanford University School of Medicine, USA
    Mol Imaging 2:138-49. 2003
  7. ncbi request reprint Delivery and inhibition of reporter genes by small interfering RNAs in a mouse skin model
    Qian Wang
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, and Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Invest Dermatol 127:2577-84. 2007
  8. ncbi request reprint Emission spectra of bioluminescent reporters and interaction with mammalian tissue determine the sensitivity of detection in vivo
    Hui Zhao
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford, California 94305 5427, USA
    J Biomed Opt 10:41210. 2005
  9. doi request reprint In vivo analysis of heat-shock-protein-70 induction following pulsed laser irradiation in a transgenic reporter mouse
    Caitlin E O'Connell-Rodwell
    Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Biomed Opt 13:030501. 2008
  10. pmc Shifting foci of hematopoiesis during reconstitution from single stem cells
    Yu An Cao
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:221-6. 2004

Research Grants

  1. SPATIOTEMPORAL ANALYSES OF NEONATAL HOST RESPONSE
    Christopher Contag; Fiscal Year: 1999
  2. SPATIOTEMPORAL ANALYSES OF NEONATAL HOST RESPONSE
    Christopher Contag; Fiscal Year: 2000
  3. Extracellular Replication of Listeria in Vivo
    Christopher Contag; Fiscal Year: 2009
  4. Spatiotemporal Analysis of Neoplasia in Animal Models
    Christopher Contag; Fiscal Year: 2006
  5. VISUALIZING INSULITIS--IDDM PATHOGENESIS AND THERAPY
    Christopher Contag; Fiscal Year: 2003
  6. IN VIVO MULTIMODALITY IMAGING OF NEOPLASTIC DISEASE
    Christopher Contag; Fiscal Year: 2002
  7. VISIBLE ANIMAL MODELS OF NEOPLASTIC DISEASE
    Christopher Contag; Fiscal Year: 2002
  8. Imaging Spontaneous Breast Cancer in Mouse Models
    Christopher Contag; Fiscal Year: 2002
  9. SPATIOTEMPORAL ANALYSES OF NEONATAL HOST RESPONSE
    Christopher Contag; Fiscal Year: 2002
  10. VISUALIZING INSULITIS--IDDM PATHOGENESIS AND THERAPY
    Christopher Contag; Fiscal Year: 2001

Detail Information

Publications80

  1. pmc Sustained release of drugs dispersed in polymer nanoparticles
    Gunilla B Jacobson
    Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, 333 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5080, USA
    Angew Chem Int Ed Engl 47:7880-2. 2008
  2. ncbi request reprint Molecular imaging using visible light to reveal biological changes in the brain
    Christopher H Contag
    Departments of Pediatrics, Microbiology and Immunology and Radiology, E150 Clark Center, MC 5427, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroimaging Clin N Am 16:633-54, ix. 2006
    ....
  3. pmc Heme oxygenase-1 deletion affects stress erythropoiesis
    Yu An Cao
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e20634. 2011
    ..We have previously demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) deficiency leads to disrupted stress hematopoiesis. Here, we describe the specific effects of HO-1 deficiency on stress erythropoiesis...
  4. pmc Role of nitric oxide in Salmonella typhimurium-mediated cancer cell killing
    Yoram Barak
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Sherman Fairchild Science Building, Stanford University School of Medicine, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    BMC Cancer 10:146. 2010
    ..Whether NO generation by the bacteria has a role in SL7838 lethality to cancer cells is explored. This bacterium has the mechanism for generating NO, but also for decomposing it...
  5. ncbi request reprint In vivo pathology: seeing with molecular specificity and cellular resolution in the living body
    Christopher H Contag
    Department of Pediatrics, Radiology, and Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Pathol 2:277-305. 2007
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint Effects of metalloporphyrins on heme oxygenase-1 transcription: correlative cell culture assays guide in vivo imaging
    Monica Hajdena-Dawson
    Stanford University School of Medicine, USA
    Mol Imaging 2:138-49. 2003
    ..Thus, this study serves as a model for understanding the effects of specific compounds in relation to defined targets using an integrated approach...
  7. ncbi request reprint Delivery and inhibition of reporter genes by small interfering RNAs in a mouse skin model
    Qian Wang
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, and Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Invest Dermatol 127:2577-84. 2007
    ..These results indicate that small interfering RNA, delivered locally as RNA directly or expressed from viral or non-viral vectors, may be effective agents for treating skin disorders...
  8. ncbi request reprint Emission spectra of bioluminescent reporters and interaction with mammalian tissue determine the sensitivity of detection in vivo
    Hui Zhao
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford, California 94305 5427, USA
    J Biomed Opt 10:41210. 2005
    ..These spectral measurement data allow for improved understanding of how these reporters can be used in vivo and what they can reveal about biological processes in living subjects...
  9. doi request reprint In vivo analysis of heat-shock-protein-70 induction following pulsed laser irradiation in a transgenic reporter mouse
    Caitlin E O'Connell-Rodwell
    Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Biomed Opt 13:030501. 2008
    ..This model can be used to noninvasively reveal levels of Hsp70 transcription in living tissues, and has utility in studies of the predictive and protective effects of Hsp70 expression, and of various stress responses in tissues...
  10. pmc Shifting foci of hematopoiesis during reconstitution from single stem cells
    Yu An Cao
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:221-6. 2004
    ....
  11. ncbi request reprint Multi-modality imaging identifies key times for annexin V imaging as an early predictor of therapeutic outcome
    Stefanie J Mandl
    Stanford University, School of Medicine, CA 94305 5208, USA
    Mol Imaging 3:1-8. 2004
    ..Multimodality imaging revealed the temporal patterns of tumor cell loss and annexin V uptake revealing a better understanding of the timing of radiolabeled annexin V uptake for its development as a marker of therapeutic efficacy...
  12. ncbi request reprint In vivo bioluminescence imaging for integrated studies of infection
    Timothy C Doyle
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Clark Center, Bio X Program, 318 Campus Drive, Room E 150, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Cell Microbiol 6:303-17. 2004
    ....
  13. ncbi request reprint Advancing molecular therapies through in vivo bioluminescent imaging
    Anton McCaffrey
    Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Mol Imaging 2:75-86. 2003
    ..BLI can be used to accelerate the evaluation of experimental therapeutic strategies and whole body imaging offers the opportunity of revealing the effects of novel approaches on key steps in disease processes...
  14. pmc Timing of bone marrow cell delivery has minimal effects on cell viability and cardiac recovery after myocardial infarction
    Rutger Jan Swijnenburg
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Circ Cardiovasc Imaging 3:77-85. 2010
    ..We compared the viability and effects of transplanted BMCs on cardiac function in the acute and subacute inflammatory phases of myocardial infarction...
  15. ncbi request reprint Molecular imaging using labeled donor tissues reveals patterns of engraftment, rejection, and survival in transplantation
    Yu An Cao
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Transplantation 80:134-9. 2005
    ..This imaging approach is sensitive and reproducible, permits study of the dynamic range of the entire process of transplantation, and will greatly enhance studies across various disciplines involving transplantation...
  16. pmc Detection of colonic dysplasia in vivo using a targeted heptapeptide and confocal microendoscopy
    Pei Lin Hsiung
    Department of Pediatrics, Radiology and Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 318 Campus Dr, Rm E 150, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Med 14:454-8. 2008
    ..This methodology represents a promising diagnostic imaging approach for the early detection of colorectal cancer and potentially of other epithelial malignancies...
  17. pmc Molecular imaging of bone marrow mononuclear cell homing and engraftment in ischemic myocardium
    Ahmad Y Sheikh
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Edwards Building R354, Stanford, California 94305 5344, USA
    Stem Cells 25:2677-84. 2007
    ..Specifically, we have demonstrated that systemically delivered BMMCs preferentially home to and are retained by injured myocardium. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article...
  18. ncbi request reprint Tumor imaging using a standardized radiolabeled adapter protein docked to vascular endothelial growth factor
    Francis G Blankenberg
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94304, USA
    J Nucl Med 45:1373-80. 2004
    ..The assembly of this complex is based on interactions between human 109-amino acid (HuS) and 15-amino acid (Hu-tag) fragments of ribonuclease I, which serve as an "Adapter protein" and a Docking tag, respectively...
  19. pmc Dual-axis confocal microscope for high-resolution in vivo imaging
    Thomas D Wang
    Stanford University School of Medicine, 269 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 5187, USA
    Opt Lett 28:414-6. 2003
    ..3 and 2.1 microm, respectively, in free space, and confirm subcellular resolution in excised esophageal mucosa. The optics may be scaled to millimeter dimensions and fiber coupled for collection of high-resolution images in vivo...
  20. ncbi request reprint Expression and regulation of heme oxygenase isozymes in the developing mouse cortex
    Hui Zhao
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5208, USA
    Pediatr Res 60:518-23. 2006
    ..Therefore, we conclude that HO-1 gene expression in the cortex is developmentally-regulated and that methylation of the HO-1 CpG island is not associated with the down-regulation of the gene...
  21. pmc Three-dimensional in vivo imaging by a handheld dual-axes confocal microscope
    Hyejun Ra
    Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Opt Express 16:7224-32. 2008
    ..The transverse and axial resolutions of the handheld probe are 1.7 microm and 5.8 microm, respectively. Capability to perform real time small animal imaging is demonstrated in vivo in transgenic mice...
  22. ncbi request reprint The potential Salmonella aroA- vaccine strain is safe and effective in young BALB/c mice
    Stacy M Burns-Guydish
    Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5208, USA
    Neonatology 91:114-20. 2007
    ..Due to the increased susceptibility of neonates to pathogens including those with mutations, the use of live vaccine strategies in the human population may present a potential risk to the young...
  23. pmc Lymphoid-tissue-specific homing of bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells
    Remi J Creusot
    Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Blood 113:6638-47. 2009
    ....
  24. pmc Ex vivo expanded dendritic cells home to T-cell zones of lymphoid organs and survive in vivo after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation
    Christoph H Schimmelpfennig
    Division of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Center for Clinical Science Building, Room 2205, 269 West Campus Dr, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Am J Pathol 167:1321-31. 2005
    ..These findings are important for adoptive immunotherapies because they indicate that eDCs migrate efficiently in vivo and are capable of surviving long term...
  25. pmc Real-time analysis of uptake and bioactivatable cleavage of luciferin-transporter conjugates in transgenic reporter mice
    Paul A Wender
    Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5080, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:10340-5. 2007
    ....
  26. ncbi request reprint In vivo imaging using bioluminescence: a tool for probing graft-versus-host disease
    Robert S Negrin
    Department of Medicine, Center for Clinical Research Building, 269 West Campus Drive, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Rev Immunol 6:484-90. 2006
    ..This strategy could be useful for the study of a wide range of biological processes, such as the pathophysiology of graft-versus-host and graft-versus-leukaemia reactions...
  27. pmc Functional imaging of colonic mucosa with a fibered confocal microscope for real-time in vivo pathology
    Thomas D Wang
    Division of Gastroenterology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 5:1300-5. 2007
    ..The aim of this study was to show the use of functional optical imaging of viable mucosa for quantitative evaluation of colonic neoplasia in real time...
  28. ncbi request reprint Regulation of maternal and fetal hemodynamics by heme oxygenase in mice
    Hui Zhao
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5208, USA
    Biol Reprod 78:744-51. 2008
    ....
  29. pmc Dual-axes confocal reflectance microscope for distinguishing colonic neoplasia
    Jonathan T C Liu
    Ginzton Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Biomed Opt 11:054019. 2006
    ..This design is scalable to millimeter dimensions, and the results demonstrate the potential for a miniature instrument to detect precancerous tissues, and hence to perform in vivo histopathology...
  30. ncbi request reprint Design and evaluation of a variable aperture collimator for conformal radiotherapy of small animals using a microCT scanner
    Edward E Graves
    Department of Radiology Oncology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Med Phys 34:4359-67. 2007
    ..This variable aperture collimator technology is therefore a feasible and flexible solution for adjustable shaping of radiation beams for use in small animal radiotherapy as well as other applications in which beam shaping is desired...
  31. ncbi request reprint Global analysis of Smad2/3-dependent TGF-beta signaling in living mice reveals prominent tissue-specific responses to injury
    Amy H Lin
    Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Immunol 175:547-54. 2005
    ....
  32. ncbi request reprint It's not just about anatomy: in vivo bioluminescence imaging as an eyepiece into biology
    Christopher H Contag
    Departments of Pediatrics, Radiology, and Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5308, USA
    J Magn Reson Imaging 16:378-87. 2002
    ....
  33. ncbi request reprint Revealing lymphoma growth and the efficacy of immune cell therapies using in vivo bioluminescence imaging
    Matthias Edinger
    Division of Bone Marrow Transplantation, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA, USA
    Blood 101:640-8. 2003
    ..The complex cellular processes in bone marrow transplantation and antitumor immunotherapy, previously inaccessible to investigation, can now be revealed in real time in living animals...
  34. ncbi request reprint Selection of potential therapeutics based on in vivo spatiotemporal transcription patterns of heme oxygenase-1
    Weisheng Zhang
    Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5208, USA
    J Mol Med (Berl) 80:655-64. 2002
    ..Among the known inhibitors of HO enzyme activity that were evaluated in this study, ZnBG did not significantly affect HO-1 transcription and therefore may be well suited for the prevention of neonatal jaundice...
  35. doi request reprint In vivo micro-image mosaicing
    Kevin E Loewke
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, StanfordUniversity, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 58:159-71. 2011
    ....
  36. pmc Assessing delivery and quantifying efficacy of small interfering ribonucleic acid therapeutics in the skin using a dual-axis confocal microscope
    Hyejun Ra
    Stanford University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Ginzton Laboratory, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Biomed Opt 15:036027. 2010
    ..Visualization of transdermal delivery of nucleic acids will play an important role in the development of innovative strategies for treating skin pathologies...
  37. ncbi request reprint Gene transfer via reversible plasmid condensation with cysteine-flanked, internally spaced arginine-rich peptides
    Zurab Siprashvili
    VA Palo Alto Healthcare System, Palo Alto, CA 94305, USA
    Hum Gene Ther 14:1225-33. 2003
    ..Thus, cysteine-flanked, internally spaced arginine-rich (CFIS-R) peptides represent a new approach to efficient nonviral plasmid delivery using rationally designed protein transduction domains...
  38. pmc Silencing of reporter gene expression in skin using siRNAs and expression of plasmid DNA delivered by a soluble protrusion array device (PAD)
    Emilio Gonzalez-Gonzalez
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Mol Ther 18:1667-74. 2010
    ..These results support the use of PADs for delivery of functional nucleic acids to cells in the skin with an efficiency that may support clinical translation...
  39. pmc Confocal fluorescence microscope with dual-axis architecture and biaxial postobjective scanning
    Thomas D Wang
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Biomed Opt 9:735-42. 2004
    ..Furthermore, the scanning mechanism produces only small differences in aberrations over the image FOV. These results demonstrate proof of concept of the dual-axis confocal architecture for in vivo molecular and cellular imaging...
  40. pmc Dual-axes confocal microscopy with post-objective scanning and low-coherence heterodyne detection
    Thomas D Wang
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Opt Lett 28:1915-7. 2003
    ..This architecture can be scaled down to millimeter dimensions with microelectromechanical systems technology for performance of in vivo optical biopsy...
  41. ncbi request reprint Small hairpin RNAs efficiently inhibit hepatitis C IRES-mediated gene expression in human tissue culture cells and a mouse model
    Qian Wang
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Ther 12:562-8. 2005
    ..These results indicate that shRNAs, delivered as RNA or expressed from viral or nonviral vectors, may be effective agents for the control of HCV and related viruses...
  42. ncbi request reprint Adoptive transfer of mast cells does not enhance the impaired survival of Kit(W)/Kit(W-v) mice in a model of low dose intraperitoneal infection with bioluminescent Salmonella typhimurium
    Devavani Chatterjea
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Ave, L 235, Stanford, CA 94305 5324, USA
    Immunol Lett 99:122-9. 2005
    ....
  43. doi request reprint Efficient rejection of scattered light enables deep optical sectioning in turbid media with low-numerical-aperture optics in a dual-axis confocal architecture
    Jonathan T C Liu
    Stanford University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Ginzton Laboratory, and School of Medicine, James H Clark Center for Biomedical Engineering and Science, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Biomed Opt 13:034020. 2008
    ..Our results demonstrate efficient rejection of scattered light in a DACM, which enables deep optical sectioning in tissue with subcellular resolution that can distinguish between normal and premalignant pathologies...
  44. ncbi request reprint Monitoring age-related susceptibility of young mice to oral Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection using an in vivo murine model
    Stacy M Burns-Guydish
    Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Pediatr Res 58:153-8. 2005
    ..Thus, this model of age-related susceptibility to S. typhimurium using BLI can be used to advance our understanding of the mechanisms involved in newborn susceptibility to infection...
  45. ncbi request reprint Advances in in vivo bioluminescence imaging of gene expression
    Christopher H Contag
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5208, USA
    Annu Rev Biomed Eng 4:235-60. 2002
    ..Such studies will greatly facilitate the functional analysis of a wide range of genes for their roles in health and disease...
  46. doi request reprint Biodegradable nanoparticles with sustained release of functional siRNA in skin
    Gunilla B Jacobson
    Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Pharm Sci 99:4261-6. 2010
    ..In vivo gene silencing experiments were also performed, showing reduction of GFP signal in the epidermis of a reporter transgenic mouse model, which demonstrates that the siRNA retained activity following release from the polymer NPs...
  47. pmc Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency leads to disrupted response to acute stress in stem cells and progenitors
    Yu An Cao
    Departments of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA, USA
    Blood 112:4494-502. 2008
    ..Control of stem cell stress response by HO-1 presents opportunities for metabolic manipulation of stem cell-based therapies...
  48. pmc Quantifying cell-surface biomarker expression in thick tissues with ratiometric three-dimensional microscopy
    Jonathan T C Liu
    Ginzton Labs, Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Biophys J 96:2405-14. 2009
    ..This strategy enables rapid, quantitative, and unambiguous volumetric microscopy of biomarker expression in thick tissues, including whole biopsies, and will enable real-time optical assessment of disease markers in the living body...
  49. pmc Mast cell-derived TNF can exacerbate mortality during severe bacterial infections in C57BL/6-KitW-sh/W-sh mice
    Adrian M Piliponsky
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5324, USA
    Am J Pathol 176:926-38. 2010
    ..typhimurium...
  50. pmc Miniature near-infrared dual-axes confocal microscope utilizing a two-dimensional microelectromechanical systems scanner
    Jonathan T C Liu
    Edward L Ginzton Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Opt Lett 32:256-8. 2007
    ..Reflectance and fluorescence images are obtained with a laser source at 785 nm, demonstrating the ability to perform real-time optical biopsy...
  51. ncbi request reprint Understanding immune cell trafficking patterns via in vivo bioluminescence imaging
    Stefanie Mandl
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Cell Biochem Suppl 39:239-48. 2002
    ..Such rapid assays that reveal cell fates in vivo will increase our basic understanding of the molecular signals that control these migratory pathways and will substantially speed up the development and evaluation of therapies...
  52. ncbi request reprint Characterization of coelenterazine analogs for measurements of Renilla luciferase activity in live cells and living animals
    Hui Zhao
    Stanford University School of Medicine, USA
    Mol Imaging 3:43-54. 2004
    ....
  53. ncbi request reprint Luciferin derivatives for enhanced in vitro and in vivo bioluminescence assays
    Rajesh Shinde
    Department of Pediatrics, Radiology, and Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Clark Center, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Biochemistry 45:11103-12. 2006
    ..The ability to assay luciferase in vitro and in vivo using these substrates, which exhibit different pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, will provide flexibility and improve current imaging capabilities...
  54. ncbi request reprint Real-time in vivo imaging of stem cells following transgenesis by transposition
    Jakub Tolar
    Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology, Oncology, Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
    Mol Ther 12:42-8. 2005
    ..This novel dual-reporter imaging approach based on the transgenesis of MAPC with Sleeping Beauty transposons sheds light on the homing patterns of MAPC and paves the way for quantification of MAPC engraftment in real time in vivo...
  55. ncbi request reprint Releasable luciferin-transporter conjugates: tools for the real-time analysis of cellular uptake and release
    Lisa R Jones
    Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5080, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 128:6526-7. 2006
    ..The process provides a method to assay uptake and release of free luciferin as a function of variations in the releasable linker and in the transporter...
  56. ncbi request reprint Methods for imaging cell fates in hematopoiesis
    Jennifer Duda
    Program in Molecular Imaging at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Methods Mol Med 134:17-34. 2007
    ..The goal of this chapter is to provide adequate background information to allow the design and implementation of an experimental system for in vivo imaging in mice...
  57. ncbi request reprint Systemic effects of orally-administered zinc and tin (IV) metalloporphyrins on heme oxygenase expression in mice
    Ichiro Morioka
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5208, USA
    Pediatr Res 59:667-72. 2006
    ..We conclude that the three Mps are absorbed at different rates in the mouse and affect bilirubin production and HO-1 expression in a tissue- and time-dependent manner...
  58. doi request reprint Stem cell-mediated accelerated bone healing observed with in vivo molecular and small animal imaging technologies in a model of skeletal injury
    Sheen Woo Lee
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive S 062B, Stanford, California 94304, USA
    J Orthop Res 27:295-302. 2009
    ..Imaging can in the future help establish therapeutic strategies including dosage and administration route...
  59. pmc Comparison of transplantation of adipose tissue- and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in the infarcted heart
    Koen E A van der Bogt
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5324, USA
    Transplantation 87:642-52. 2009
    ..However, the in vivo fate and function of adipose stromal cells (ASC) in the infarcted heart has never been compared directly to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells (MSC)...
  60. ncbi request reprint A genetic reporter of thermal stress defines physiologic zones over a defined temperature range
    Caitlin E O'Connell-Rodwell
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94035 5208, USA
    FASEB J 18:264-71. 2004
    ..This Hsp70-luc reporter gene construct may be useful for defining zones of physiologic responses and assessing collateral thermal damage generated during treatment of biological tissue with lasers and other sources of heat...
  61. ncbi request reprint MYC inactivation uncovers pluripotent differentiation and tumour dormancy in hepatocellular cancer
    Catherine M Shachaf
    Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, California 94305, USA
    Nature 431:1112-7. 2004
    ....
  62. pmc CNOB/ChrR6, a new prodrug enzyme cancer chemotherapy
    Steve H Thorne
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Cancer Ther 8:333-41. 2009
    ..This feature may simplify exploration of barriers to the penetration of MCHB in tumors and their amelioration...
  63. ncbi request reprint Regulation of intestine-specific spatiotemporal expression by the rat lactase promoter
    So Young Lee
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Biol Chem 277:13099-105. 2002
    ..In addition, we have demonstrated that in vivo bioluminescence imaging can be utilized for assessment of intestinal expression patterns of a luciferase reporter gene driven by lactase promoter regions in transgenic mice...
  64. ncbi request reprint The effectiveness of oral tin mesoporphyrin prophylaxis in reducing bilirubin production after an oral heme load in a transgenic mouse model
    Glenn H DeSandre
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94306, USA
    Biol Neonate 89:139-46. 2006
    ..The use of tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP) has been proposed for interdicting the development of severe hyperbilirubinemia in a variety of conditions...
  65. ncbi request reprint New enzyme for reductive cancer chemotherapy, YieF, and its improvement by directed evolution
    Yoram Barak
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Sherman Fairchild Science Building, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Cancer Ther 5:97-103. 2006
    ..Thus, Y6 is a promising enzyme for use in cancer chemotherapy, and Salmonella strain SL 7838, which specifically targets tumors, may be used to deliver the prodrug-activating enzymes to tumors...
  66. ncbi request reprint Trafficking mesenchymal stem cell engraftment and differentiation in tumor-bearing mice by bioluminescence imaging
    Hui Wang
    Department of Radiology, Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    Stem Cells 27:1548-58. 2009
    ..The MSCs-R migrated to lung tumor differentiated into osteoblasts, whereas the MSCs-R targeting subcutaneous tumor differentiated into adipocytes...
  67. doi request reprint Molecular imaging of inflammation and carcinogenesis
    David A Ostrov
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, USA
    Cancer Prev Res (Phila) 4:1523-6. 2011
    ..These probes will enable the detection and localization of regions of inflammation and a wide variety of premalignant lesions and cancers, with utility in monitoring the effects of cancer prevention and therapy...
  68. ncbi request reprint Comparison of gene expression after intraperitoneal delivery of AAV2 or AAV5 in utero
    Gerald S Lipshutz
    Department of Surgery, San Francisco, California 94143 0793, USA
    Mol Ther 8:90-8. 2003
    ..The efficacy of rAAV-mediated gene delivery in utero supports the potential of these vectors for future therapies...
  69. ncbi request reprint In vivo activation of the human CYP3A4 promoter in mouse liver and regulation by pregnane X receptors
    Weisheng Zhang
    Xenogen Corporation, 860 Atlantic Avenue, Alameda, CA 94501, USA
    Biochem Pharmacol 65:1889-96. 2003
    ..The approach described here will be of general use in studying the regulation of nuclear receptors in vivo...
  70. pmc Optical monitoring and treatment of potentially lethal wound infections in vivo
    Michael R Hamblin
    Wellman Laboratories of Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA
    J Infect Dis 187:1717-25. 2003
    ..PDT-treated wounds healed significantly faster than did silver nitrate-treated wounds, and this was not due to either inhibition of healing by silver nitrate or stimulation of healing by PDT...
  71. ncbi request reprint Spatiotemporal expression of heme oxygenase-1 detected by in vivo bioluminescence after hepatic ischemia in HO-1/Luc mice
    Huawei Su
    Surgical Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
    Liver Transpl 12:1634-9. 2006
    ..The capability of whole-body temporal imaging of HO-1 expression provides a valuable tool in the development of novel strategies to modulate HO-1 expression in liver transplantation...
  72. ncbi request reprint Evaluation of effector cell fate and function by in vivo bioluminescence imaging
    Matthias Edinger
    Department of Hematology and Oncology, University of Regensburg, 93042 Regensburg, Germany
    Methods 31:172-9. 2003
    ..Here, we highlight one of the newer modalities, in vivo bioluminescence imaging, as a method for evaluating effector T cell proliferation, migration, and function in model systems of malignant and non-malignant diseases...
  73. ncbi request reprint In vivo imaging of engrafted neural stem cells: its application in evaluating the optimal timing of transplantation for spinal cord injury
    Seiji Okada
    Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan
    FASEB J 19:1839-41. 2005
    ..Optimization of cell therapies can be greatly accelerated and refined by imaging, and the methods in the present study can be widely applied to various research fields of regeneration medicine, including transplantation study...
  74. ncbi request reprint Options for visualizing metastatic disease in the living body
    Mike W Helms
    Institute of Pathology, University of Muenster, Muenster, Germany
    Contrib Microbiol 13:209-31. 2006
    ..The objective is to provide the cancer researcher with information that will help solve the dilemma of how best to apply the latest imaging tools for studying biological questions in the context of the living body...
  75. ncbi request reprint Single-nucleotide-specific siRNA targeting in a dominant-negative skin model
    Robyn P Hickerson
    TransDerm Inc, Santa Cruz, California, USA
    J Invest Dermatol 128:594-605. 2008
    ..These results suggest that efficient delivery of these "designer siRNAs" may allow effective treatment of numerous genetic disorders including PC...
  76. pmc Prevention of acute graft-versus-host disease by blocking T-cell entry to secondary lymphoid organs
    Andreas Beilhack
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University, 269 W Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Blood 111:2919-28. 2008
    ..Thus, we demonstrate redundancy of SLOs at different anatomical sites in aGVHD initiation. Only prevention of T-cell entry to all SLOs could completely abrogate the onset of aGVHD...
  77. ncbi request reprint Image-guided analyses reveal that non-CD4 splenocytes contribute to CD4+ T cell-mediated inflammation leading to islet destruction by altering their local function and not systemic trafficking patterns
    Mi Heon Lee
    Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010, USA
    Mol Imaging 6:369-83. 2007
    ....
  78. pmc Hemin-activated macrophages home to the pancreas and protect from acute pancreatitis via heme oxygenase-1 induction
    Ikuo Nakamichi
    Department of Medicine, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California, USA
    J Clin Invest 115:3007-14. 2005
    ..Therefore, hemin-like compounds or hemin-activated macrophages may offer novel therapeutic approaches for preventing acute pancreatitis and its pulmonary complication via upregulation of HO-1...
  79. pmc In vivo analyses of early events in acute graft-versus-host disease reveal sequential infiltration of T-cell subsets
    Andreas Beilhack
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Blood 106:1113-22. 2005
    ..These findings underline the potential of T-cell subsets with defined trafficking patterns for immune reconstitution without the risk of GVHD...
  80. doi request reprint Enhancing poxvirus oncolytic effects through increased spread and immune evasion
    David H Kirn
    Jennerex Biotherapeutics, Ltd, San Francisco, California, USA
    Cancer Res 68:2071-5. 2008
    ..Safety was unaffected. The incorporation of EEV-enhancing mutations into next generation oncolytic vaccinia strains may improve the potency of these viruses without sacrificing safety...

Research Grants16

  1. SPATIOTEMPORAL ANALYSES OF NEONATAL HOST RESPONSE
    Christopher Contag; Fiscal Year: 1999
    ..Since homologues of Nramp1 have been found in humans, studying this mode of resistance to microbial infection is significant for understanding disease and minimizing human infections. ..
  2. SPATIOTEMPORAL ANALYSES OF NEONATAL HOST RESPONSE
    Christopher Contag; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ..Since homologues of Nramp1 have been found in humans, studying this mode of resistance to microbial infection is significant for understanding disease and minimizing human infections. ..
  3. Extracellular Replication of Listeria in Vivo
    Christopher Contag; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..We propose to use molecular imaging techniques to learn how this bacterium colonizes the gallbladder, constituting the only current animal model of the human carrier state of typhoid fever. ..
  4. Spatiotemporal Analysis of Neoplasia in Animal Models
    Christopher Contag; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..These goals will be met by generating a shared imaging research resource at Stanford University with the ability of spatiotemporal analyses of both structure and function in neoplastic disease models. ..
  5. VISUALIZING INSULITIS--IDDM PATHOGENESIS AND THERAPY
    Christopher Contag; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..Positive results raise the possibility of transferring this technology from the NOD mouse model to human disease. ..
  6. IN VIVO MULTIMODALITY IMAGING OF NEOPLASTIC DISEASE
    Christopher Contag; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..This will provide us with a unique opportunity for a multifaceted study of neoplasia that will identify novel therapeutic targets and reveal basic mechanisms of disease through state of the art imaging. ..
  7. VISIBLE ANIMAL MODELS OF NEOPLASTIC DISEASE
    Christopher Contag; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..1 R33 CA88303-01 -3- Christopher Contag, Ph.D.
  8. Imaging Spontaneous Breast Cancer in Mouse Models
    Christopher Contag; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..These studies are likely to provide basic biological insights and therapeutic strategies useful for more effective treatment of patients. ..
  9. SPATIOTEMPORAL ANALYSES OF NEONATAL HOST RESPONSE
    Christopher Contag; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..Since homologues of Nramp1 have been found in humans, studying this mode of resistance to microbial infection is significant for understanding disease and minimizing human infections. ..
  10. VISUALIZING INSULITIS--IDDM PATHOGENESIS AND THERAPY
    Christopher Contag; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..Positive results raise the possibility of transferring this technology from the NOD mouse model to human disease. ..
  11. VISUALIZING INSULITIS--IDDM PATHOGENESIS AND THERAPY
    Christopher Contag; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ..Positive results raise the possibility of transferring this technology from the NOD mouse model to human disease. ..
  12. Extracellular Replication of Listeria in Vivo
    Christopher H Contag; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..We propose to use molecular imaging techniques to learn how this bacterium colonizes the gallbladder, constituting the only current animal model of the human carrier state of typhoid fever. ..
  13. VISUALIZING INSULITIS--IDDM PATHOGENESIS AND THERAPY
    Christopher Contag; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..Positive results raise the possibility of transferring this technology from the NOD mouse model to human disease. ..
  14. SPATIOTEMPORAL ANALYSES OF NEONATAL HOST RESPONSE
    Christopher Contag; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..Since homologues of Nramp1 have been found in humans, studying this mode of resistance to microbial infection is significant for understanding disease and minimizing human infections. ..