KARLENE CIMPRICH

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Opposing effects of the UV lesion repair protein XPA and UV bypass polymerase eta on ATR checkpoint signaling
    Ryan D Bomgarden
    Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5174, USA
    EMBO J 25:2605-14. 2006
  2. ncbi request reprint Probing ATR activation with model DNA templates
    Karlene A Cimprich
    Stanford University, Department of Chemical and Systems Biology, Stanford, California 94305 5441, USA
    Cell Cycle 6:2348-54. 2007
  3. pmc ATR: an essential regulator of genome integrity
    Karlene A Cimprich
    Department of Chemical and Systems Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Clark Center, 318 Campus Drive, W350B, Stanford, California 94305 5441, USA
    Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 9:616-27. 2008
  4. ncbi request reprint Fragile sites: breaking up over a slowdown
    Karlene A Cimprich
    Stanford University, Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Stanford, CA 94305 5174, USA
    Curr Biol 13:R231-3. 2003
  5. pmc A requirement for replication in activation of the ATR-dependent DNA damage checkpoint
    Patrick J Lupardus
    Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5174, USA
    Genes Dev 16:2327-32. 2002
  6. ncbi request reprint The ATR pathway: fine-tuning the fork
    Renee D Paulsen
    Department of Chemical and Systems Biology, Stanford University, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5441, USA
    DNA Repair (Amst) 6:953-66. 2007
  7. pmc The structural determinants of checkpoint activation
    Christina A MacDougall
    Department of Chemical and Systems Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Genes Dev 21:898-903. 2007
  8. pmc Functional uncoupling of MCM helicase and DNA polymerase activities activates the ATR-dependent checkpoint
    Tony S Byun
    Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Genes Dev 19:1040-52. 2005
  9. ncbi request reprint ATR kinase activity regulates the intranuclear translocation of ATR and RPA following ionizing radiation
    Sharon M Barr
    Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Stanford University, California 94305 5174, USA
    Curr Biol 13:1047-51. 2003
  10. pmc A genome-wide siRNA screen reveals diverse cellular processes and pathways that mediate genome stability
    Renee D Paulsen
    Department of Chemical and Systems Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Cell 35:228-39. 2009

Research Grants

  1. Regulation of the DNA damage Response
    KARLENE CIMPRICH; Fiscal Year: 2009
  2. Regulation of the DNA damage Response
    KARLENE CIMPRICH; Fiscal Year: 2007
  3. Role of ATR in the DNA Damage Response
    KARLENE CIMPRICH; Fiscal Year: 2006
  4. Development of Assays for DNA Damage Checkpoints
    KARLENE CIMPRICH; Fiscal Year: 2003
  5. Regulation of the DNA damage Response
    Karlene A Cimprich; Fiscal Year: 2010

Collaborators

  • DAVID K contact CORTEZ
  • W Wang
  • Matthew J O'Connell
  • JAMES FERRELL
  • James Ford
  • Shou Waga
  • Maureen E Hoatlin
  • David Shechter
  • Patrick J Lupardus
  • Muh Ching Yee
  • Christopher Van
  • Renee D Paulsen
  • Debbie J Chang
  • Ryan D Bomgarden
  • Tony S Byun
  • Vincenzo Costanzo
  • Robert Driscoll
  • Deena V Soni
  • Christina A MacDougall
  • Alexandra Sobeck
  • Jean Gautier
  • Sharon M Barr
  • W Matthew Michael
  • Shan Yan
  • Angela T Hahn
  • Anna Guan
  • David E Solow-Cordero
  • Jayne A Hesley
  • STEVEN C MILLER
  • Tobias Meyer
  • Evan F Cromwell
  • Roy Wollman
  • Bendert de Graaf
  • Susan Olson
  • Jan L Christian
  • Tanja Reuter
  • Michael Wallisch
  • Stacie Stone
  • Hans Joenje
  • Johan de Winter
  • Yassmine Akkari
  • Stefanie C Fas
  • Johannes C Walter
  • Michelle M Stohlmeyer
  • Thomas J Wandless
  • Marcin Pacek
  • Dawn Yean
  • Max Gottesman
  • Cindy G Leung
  • Elbert E Chang
  • Mohammad Hekmat-Nejad
  • Tony Byun

Detail Information

Publications23

  1. pmc Opposing effects of the UV lesion repair protein XPA and UV bypass polymerase eta on ATR checkpoint signaling
    Ryan D Bomgarden
    Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5174, USA
    EMBO J 25:2605-14. 2006
    ..Taken together, these results suggest that lesion bypass and not lesion repair may raise the level of UV damage that can be tolerated before checkpoint activation, and that XPA plays a critical role in this activation...
  2. ncbi request reprint Probing ATR activation with model DNA templates
    Karlene A Cimprich
    Stanford University, Department of Chemical and Systems Biology, Stanford, California 94305 5441, USA
    Cell Cycle 6:2348-54. 2007
    ..Here we discuss the implications of our findings, in the context of other recent work in the field, on our understanding of checkpoint signaling...
  3. pmc ATR: an essential regulator of genome integrity
    Karlene A Cimprich
    Department of Chemical and Systems Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Clark Center, 318 Campus Drive, W350B, Stanford, California 94305 5441, USA
    Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 9:616-27. 2008
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Fragile sites: breaking up over a slowdown
    Karlene A Cimprich
    Stanford University, Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Stanford, CA 94305 5174, USA
    Curr Biol 13:R231-3. 2003
    ..Recent data suggest that these sites depend on the checkpoint kinase ATR to maintain their stability...
  5. pmc A requirement for replication in activation of the ATR-dependent DNA damage checkpoint
    Patrick J Lupardus
    Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5174, USA
    Genes Dev 16:2327-32. 2002
    ..These data indicate that replication is required for activation of the DNA damage checkpoint and suggest a unifying model for ATR activation by diverse lesions during S phase...
  6. ncbi request reprint The ATR pathway: fine-tuning the fork
    Renee D Paulsen
    Department of Chemical and Systems Biology, Stanford University, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5441, USA
    DNA Repair (Amst) 6:953-66. 2007
    ..This review summarizes our current understanding of how the ATR pathway recognizes and stabilizes stalled replication forks...
  7. pmc The structural determinants of checkpoint activation
    Christina A MacDougall
    Department of Chemical and Systems Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Genes Dev 21:898-903. 2007
    ..These observations define the minimal DNA requirements for checkpoint activation and suggest that primed ssDNA represents a common checkpoint activating-structure formed following many types of damage...
  8. pmc Functional uncoupling of MCM helicase and DNA polymerase activities activates the ATR-dependent checkpoint
    Tony S Byun
    Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Genes Dev 19:1040-52. 2005
    ....
  9. ncbi request reprint ATR kinase activity regulates the intranuclear translocation of ATR and RPA following ionizing radiation
    Sharon M Barr
    Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Stanford University, California 94305 5174, USA
    Curr Biol 13:1047-51. 2003
    ..These observations demonstrate that the kinase activity of ATR is essential for the irradiation-induced release of ATR and RPA from PML bodies and translocation of ATR and RPA to potential sites of DNA damage...
  10. pmc A genome-wide siRNA screen reveals diverse cellular processes and pathways that mediate genome stability
    Renee D Paulsen
    Department of Chemical and Systems Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Cell 35:228-39. 2009
    ..These data indicate that preservation of genome stability is mediated by a larger network of biological processes than previously appreciated...
  11. pmc Analyzing the ATR-mediated checkpoint using Xenopus egg extracts
    Patrick J Lupardus
    Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Stanford University, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5441, USA
    Methods 41:222-31. 2007
    ..In addition, we describe several key assays for studying checkpoint activation as well as methods for using small DNA structures to activate ATR...
  12. pmc Phosphorylation of Xenopus Rad1 and Hus1 defines a readout for ATR activation that is independent of Claspin and the Rad9 carboxy terminus
    Patrick J Lupardus
    Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5441, USA
    Mol Biol Cell 17:1559-69. 2006
    ..Thus, Rad1 phosphorylation provides an alternate and early readout for the study of ATR activation...
  13. pmc Continued primer synthesis at stalled replication forks contributes to checkpoint activation
    Christopher Van
    Department of Chemical and Systems Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Cell Biol 189:233-46. 2010
    ..These results suggest that new primers are synthesized at stalled replication forks by the leading and lagging strand polymerases and that accumulation of these primers may contribute to checkpoint activation...
  14. ncbi request reprint Checkpoint adaptation; molecular mechanisms uncovered
    Patrick J Lupardus
    Stanford University, Department of Molecular Pharmacology, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Cell 117:555-6. 2004
    ..A new report in this issue of Cell by suggests the presence of a checkpoint adaptation pathway in Xenopus egg extracts that displays interesting molecular parallels to adaptation in yeast...
  15. ncbi request reprint A novel protein activity mediates DNA binding of an ATR-ATRIP complex
    Ryan D Bomgarden
    Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5441, USA
    J Biol Chem 279:13346-53. 2004
    ....
  16. ncbi request reprint A cell-permeable, activity-based probe for protein and lipid kinases
    Muh Ching Yee
    Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5441, USA
    J Biol Chem 280:29053-9. 2005
    ..The biotin-wortmannin reagent is effective in the isolation of labeled proteins; all three can be used for protein labeling, and BODIPY-wortmannin is cell-permeable and can be used to label proteins within cells...
  17. pmc HARPing on about the DNA damage response during replication
    Robert Driscoll
    Department of Chemical and Systems Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Genes Dev 23:2359-65. 2009
    ..Knockdown of HARP results in hypersensitivity to multiple DNA-damaging agents and defects in fork stability or restart. These exciting insights reveal a key new player in the S-phase DNA damage response...
  18. ncbi request reprint Monoubiquitination of proliferating cell nuclear antigen induced by stalled replication requires uncoupling of DNA polymerase and mini-chromosome maintenance helicase activities
    Debbie J Chang
    Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5441, USA
    J Biol Chem 281:32081-8. 2006
    ....
  19. ncbi request reprint Enforced proximity in the function of a famous scaffold
    James E Ferrell
    Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Cell 11:289-91. 2003
    ..Recent studies by Park, Zarrinipar, and Lim with reengineered Ste5 scaffold proteins underscore the fundamental importance of proximity in enzyme regulation and of keeping a proper distance for maintaining signaling specificity...
  20. pmc DNA damage tolerance: when it's OK to make mistakes
    Debbie J Chang
    Department of Chemical and Systems Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Clark Center, 318 Campus Drive, W350B, Stanford, California 94305 5441, USA
    Nat Chem Biol 5:82-90. 2009
    ..Here, we discuss how two types of DNA damage tolerance, translesion synthesis and template switching, are regulated at stalled replication forks by ubiquitination of PCNA, and the conditions under which they occur...
  21. ncbi request reprint G2 damage checkpoints: what is the turn-on?
    Matthew J O'Connell
    Department of Oncological Sciences, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave L Levy Place, Box 1130, New York, NY 10029, USA
    J Cell Sci 118:1-6. 2005
    ..In this context, ATR is activated and then phosphorylates the C-terminus of Chk1, activating it to enforce a block to mitotic entry...
  22. ncbi request reprint An ATR- and Cdc7-dependent DNA damage checkpoint that inhibits initiation of DNA replication
    Vincenzo Costanzo
    Department of Genetics and Development, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Mol Cell 11:203-13. 2003
    ..The checkpoint does not require pre-RC assembly but requires loading of the single-strand binding protein, RPA, on chromatin. This is the biochemical demonstration of a DNA damage checkpoint that targets Cdc7/Dbf4 protein kinase...
  23. pmc Fanconi anemia proteins are required to prevent accumulation of replication-associated DNA double-strand breaks
    Alexandra Sobeck
    Division of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Oregon Health and Science University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Rd, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA
    Mol Cell Biol 26:425-37. 2006
    ....

Research Grants11

  1. Regulation of the DNA damage Response
    KARLENE CIMPRICH; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ....
  2. Regulation of the DNA damage Response
    KARLENE CIMPRICH; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ....
  3. Role of ATR in the DNA Damage Response
    KARLENE CIMPRICH; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..Furthermore, they should provide important insights into human disease such as cancer and the complex process of human aging. ..
  4. Development of Assays for DNA Damage Checkpoints
    KARLENE CIMPRICH; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..These molecules may also be clinically useful for anti-cancer therapy, particularly when used in combination with chemotherapeutic agents that activate the DNA damage checkpoint or inhibit DNA replication. ..
  5. Regulation of the DNA damage Response
    Karlene A Cimprich; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....