Zhen Cheng

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of mitochondria targeting theranostic agents
    Song Wu
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Bio X Program, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, California, 94305 5344, USA
    Chem Commun (Camb) 50:8919-22. 2014
  2. pmc Molecular optical imaging with radioactive probes
    Hongguang Liu
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 5:e9470. 2010
  3. pmc Molecular imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts with epidermal growth factor receptor targeted affibody probes
    Ping Zhao
    Department of Digestive, China Japan Union Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130033, China
    Biomed Res Int 2013:759057. 2013
  4. pmc PET Imaging of Integrin Positive Tumors Using F Labeled Knottin Peptides
    Shuanglong Liu
    1 Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Bio X Program, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, California, 94305 5344, USA
    Theranostics 1:403-12. 2011
  5. pmc Functional mutation of multiple solvent-exposed loops in the Ecballium elaterium trypsin inhibitor-II cystine knot miniprotein
    Richard H Kimura
    Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Cancer Center, Bio X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e16112. 2011
  6. pmc 111In-labeled cystine-knot peptides based on the Agouti-related protein for targeting tumor angiogenesis
    Lei Jiang
    Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai Sixth People s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200233, China
    J Biomed Biotechnol 2012:368075. 2012
  7. ncbi Optical image-guided cancer therapy
    Lihong Bu
    Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, 1201 Welch Road, Lucas Expansion, P095, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5484, USA
    Curr Pharm Biotechnol 14:723-32. 2014
  8. ncbi Near infrared receptor-targeted nanoprobes for early diagnosis of cancers
    K Cheng
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Bio X Program, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, California, 94305 5344, USA
    Curr Med Chem 19:4767-85. 2012
  9. ncbi 64Cu-labeled alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone analog for microPET imaging of melanocortin 1 receptor expression
    Zhen Cheng
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5344, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 18:765-72. 2007
  10. doi 64Cu-labeled affibody molecules for imaging of HER2 expressing tumors
    Zhen Cheng
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering, Bio X Program, Stanford University, California, CA 94305 5344, USA
    Mol Imaging Biol 12:316-24. 2010

Research Grants

  1. VEGFR-2 Targeted Imaging
    Zhen Cheng; Fiscal Year: 2009
  2. Radiolabeled RGD Peptides for Breast Cancer Imaging and Therapy
    Zhen Cheng; Fiscal Year: 2009
  3. VEGFR-2 Targeted Imaging
    Zhen Cheng; Fiscal Year: 2010
  4. Radiolabeled RGD Peptides for Breast Cancer Imaging and Therapy
    Zhen Cheng; Fiscal Year: 2010

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications82

  1. ncbi Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of mitochondria targeting theranostic agents
    Song Wu
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Bio X Program, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, California, 94305 5344, USA
    Chem Commun (Camb) 50:8919-22. 2014
    ..Uptake and cytotoxicity studies indicate that FF16 and FF16-TPP, two compounds discovered in this study, are promising mitochondria targeting theranostic agents. ..
  2. pmc Molecular optical imaging with radioactive probes
    Hongguang Liu
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 5:e9470. 2010
    ..These techniques generally require bioluminescent and fluorescent probes. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of using radioactive probes for in vivo molecular OI...
  3. pmc Molecular imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts with epidermal growth factor receptor targeted affibody probes
    Ping Zhao
    Department of Digestive, China Japan Union Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130033, China
    Biomed Res Int 2013:759057. 2013
    ..Thus, affibody-based PET imaging of EGFR provides a promising approach for detecting HCC in vivo...
  4. pmc PET Imaging of Integrin Positive Tumors Using F Labeled Knottin Peptides
    Shuanglong Liu
    1 Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Bio X Program, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, California, 94305 5344, USA
    Theranostics 1:403-12. 2011
    ..5F enabled integrin-specific PET imaging of U87MG tumors with good imaging contrasts. (18)F-FP-2.5D demonstrated more desirable pharmacokinetics compared to (18)F-FP-2.5F, and thus has greater potential for clinical translation...
  5. pmc Functional mutation of multiple solvent-exposed loops in the Ecballium elaterium trypsin inhibitor-II cystine knot miniprotein
    Richard H Kimura
    Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Cancer Center, Bio X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e16112. 2011
    ..Here, EETI-II was further explored as a molecular scaffold for polypeptide engineering by evaluating the ability to mutate two of its structurally adjacent loops...
  6. pmc 111In-labeled cystine-knot peptides based on the Agouti-related protein for targeting tumor angiogenesis
    Lei Jiang
    Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai Sixth People s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200233, China
    J Biomed Biotechnol 2012:368075. 2012
    ..Thus, (111)In-DOTA-AgRP-7C is a promising probe for targeting integrin α(v)β(3) positive tumors in living subjects...
  7. ncbi Optical image-guided cancer therapy
    Lihong Bu
    Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, 1201 Welch Road, Lucas Expansion, P095, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5484, USA
    Curr Pharm Biotechnol 14:723-32. 2014
    ..CLI is a novel radioactive optical hybrid imaging strategy and its use for animal and clinical translation was also discussed. Perspectives on the translation of optical image-guided cancer therapy into clinical practice were provided. ..
  8. ncbi Near infrared receptor-targeted nanoprobes for early diagnosis of cancers
    K Cheng
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Bio X Program, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, California, 94305 5344, USA
    Curr Med Chem 19:4767-85. 2012
    ..With ongoing efforts to enhance their targeting ability and endow more functions, NIR nanoprobes hold great promise for clinical translation...
  9. ncbi 64Cu-labeled alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone analog for microPET imaging of melanocortin 1 receptor expression
    Zhen Cheng
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5344, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 18:765-72. 2007
    ..This study demonstrates that 64Cu-DOTA-NAPamide is a promising molecular probe for alpha-MSH receptor positive melanoma PET imaging as well as MC1R expression imaging in living mice...
  10. doi 64Cu-labeled affibody molecules for imaging of HER2 expressing tumors
    Zhen Cheng
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering, Bio X Program, Stanford University, California, CA 94305 5344, USA
    Mol Imaging Biol 12:316-24. 2010
    ..The development of molecular probes based on novel engineered protein constructs is under active investigation due to the great potential of this generalizable strategy for imaging a variety of tumor targets...
  11. ncbi Small-animal PET of melanocortin 1 receptor expression using a 18F-labeled alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone analog
    Zhen Cheng
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Nucl Med 48:987-94. 2007
    ..It is a promising molecular target for diagnosis and therapy of melanomas. However, (18)F compounds have not been successfully developed for imaging the MC1R...
  12. ncbi Direct site-specific radiolabeling of an Affibody protein with 4-[18F]fluorobenzaldehyde via oxime chemistry
    Mohammad Namavari
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bioengineering, Bio X Program, Stanford University, 318 Campus Dr, Clark Center, E 150, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Imaging Biol 10:177-81. 2008
    ..In this study, we introduce a methodology for preparing 18F-labeled Affibody protein, specifically 18F-Anti-HER2 dimeric Affibody (14 kDa), for in vivo imaging of HER2neu with positron emission tomography (PET)...
  13. ncbi PET of malignant melanoma using 18F-labeled metallopeptides
    Gang Ren
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    J Nucl Med 50:1865-72. 2009
    ..Therefore, we hypothesized that ReCCMSH(Arg(11)) could be a good platform for the further development of an (18)F-labeled probe for PET of MC1R-positive malignant melanoma...
  14. pmc An engineered knottin peptide labeled with 18F for PET imaging of integrin expression
    Zheng Miao
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Bio X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 20:2342-7. 2009
    ..5D allows integrin-specific PET imaging of U87MG tumors with good contrast and further demonstrates that knottins are excellent peptide scaffolds for development of PET probes with potential for clinical translation...
  15. pmc A novel method for direct site-specific radiolabeling of peptides using [18F]FDG
    Mohammad Namavari
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering, Bio X Program, Stanford University, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 20:432-6. 2009
    ..The results have implications for radiolabeling of other macromolecules and would lead to a very simple strategy for routine preclinical and clinical use...
  16. ncbi A 2-helix small protein labeled with 68Ga for PET imaging of HER2 expression
    Gang Ren
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    J Nucl Med 50:1492-9. 2009
    ....
  17. ncbi In vivo targeting of HER2-positive tumor using 2-helix affibody molecules
    Gang Ren
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University, California, Stanford, CA 94305 5344, USA
    Amino Acids 43:405-13. 2012
    ..Two-helix small protein scaffold holds great promise as a novel and robust platform for imaging and therapy applications...
  18. ncbi Theranostics of malignant melanoma with 64CuCl2
    Chunxia Qin
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California and
    J Nucl Med 55:812-7. 2014
    ..Human copper transporter 1 (CTR1) is overexpressed in a variety of cancers. This study aimed to evaluate the use of (64)CuCl2 as a theranostic agent for PET and radionuclide therapy of malignant melanoma...
  19. pmc Particle size, surface coating, and PEGylation influence the biodistribution of quantum dots in living mice
    Meike L Schipper
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology, Bio X Program, Stanford University, 318 Campus Drive, Palo Alto, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Small 5:126-34. 2009
    ..Renal excretion of small QDs and slowing of RES clearance by PEGylation or peptide surface coating are encouraging steps toward the use of modified QDs for imaging living subjects...
  20. pmc In vivo tumor-targeted fluorescence imaging using near-infrared non-cadmium quantum dots
    Jinhao Gao
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, School of Medicine, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, California 94305 5484, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 21:604-9. 2010
    ..The high reproducibility of bioconjunction between QDs and the RGD peptide and the feasibility of QD-RGD bioconjugates as tumor-targeted fluorescence probes warrant the successful application of QDs for in vivo molecular imaging...
  21. ncbi Small-animal PET imaging of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 expression with site-specific 18F-labeled protein scaffold molecules
    Zhen Cheng
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Bio X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Nucl Med 49:804-13. 2008
    ....
  22. pmc Engineered knottin peptides: a new class of agents for imaging integrin expression in living subjects
    Richard H Kimura
    Department of Bioengineering, Cancer Center, Bio X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Cancer Res 69:2435-42. 2009
    ..Thus, engineered integrin-binding knottin peptides show great potential as clinical diagnostics for a variety of cancers...
  23. doi Melanin-targeted preclinical PET imaging of melanoma metastasis
    Gang Ren
    Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Nucl Med 50:1692-9. 2009
    ....
  24. ncbi 18F-fluorobenzoate-labeled cystine knot peptides for PET imaging of integrin αvβ6
    Benjamin J Hackel
    Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Canary Center for Cancer Early Detection, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    J Nucl Med 54:1101-5. 2013
    ..A molecular PET agent for integrin αvβ6 could provide significant clinical utility by facilitating both cancer staging and treatment monitoring to more rapidly identify an effective therapeutic approach...
  25. ncbi Intraoperative imaging of tumors using Cerenkov luminescence endoscopy: a feasibility experimental study
    Hongguang Liu
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Nucl Med 53:1579-84. 2012
    ..We developed a prototype customized fiberscopic Cerenkov imaging system to investigate the potential in guiding minimally invasive surgical resection...
  26. ncbi A novel 18F-labeled two-helix scaffold protein for PET imaging of HER2-positive tumor
    Zheng Miao
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology, Stanford Cancer Center, Bio X Program, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road, Lucas Expansion, P095, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 38:1977-84. 2011
    ..In this research we aimed to develop an (18)F-labeled two-helix scaffold protein for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of HER2-positive tumors...
  27. ncbi Small-animal PET imaging of human epidermal growth factor receptor positive tumor with a 64Cu labeled affibody protein
    Zheng Miao
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5344, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 21:947-54. 2010
    ..Thus, (64)Cu-DOTA-Z(EGFR:1907) showed potential as a high tumor contrast EGFR PET imaging reagent. The probe spiked with 50 microg of Ac-Cys-Z(EGFR:1907) improved tumor imaging contrast which may have important clinical applications...
  28. doi Cy5.5-labeled Affibody molecule for near-infrared fluorescent optical imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor positive tumors
    Zheng Miao
    Stanford University, Stanford Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, 1201 Welch Road, Lucas Expansion, P095, Stanford, California 94305 5344, USA
    J Biomed Opt 15:036007. 2010
    ..There is rapid achievement of good tumor-to-normal-tissue contrasts of Cy5.5-Z(EGFR:1907), thus demonstrating its potential for EGFR-targeted molecular imaging of cancers...
  29. doi PET of EGFR expression with an 18F-labeled affibody molecule
    Zheng Miao
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Bio X Program, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Nucl Med 53:1110-8. 2012
    ..In this research, an Affibody analog, anti-EGFR Ac-Cys-Z(EGFR:1907), was successfully site-specifically (18)F-labeled for PET of EGFR expression...
  30. pmc Radiolabeled affibody-albumin bioconjugates for HER2-positive cancer targeting
    Susan Hoppmann
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California, 94305, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 22:413-21. 2011
    ..g., ⁹⁰Y or ¹⁷⁷Lu) for treatment studies. The approach of using HSA to optimize the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution profile of Affibodies may be extended to the design of many other targeting molecules...
  31. pmc Assessment and comparison of magnetic nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents in a rodent model of human hepatocellular carcinoma
    Lihong Bu
    Department of Radiology, the Fourth Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Heilongjiang, China
    Contrast Media Mol Imaging 7:363-72. 2012
    ..The success of this study suggests that, by improving the synthetic approach and by tuning the surface properties of IONPs, one can arrive at better formulas than Feridex for clinical practice...
  32. ncbi Near-infrared fluorescent RGD peptides for optical imaging of integrin alphavbeta3 expression in living mice
    Zhen Cheng
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University, California 94305 5344, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 16:1433-41. 2005
    ..The multmerization of RGD peptide results in moderate improvement of imaging characteristics of the tetramer, compared to that of the monomer and dimeric counterparts...
  33. pmc HSA coated MnO nanoparticles with prominent MRI contrast for tumor imaging
    Jing Huang
    Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road P087, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Chem Commun (Camb) 46:6684-6. 2010
    ..In a U87MG glioblastoma xenograft model, we confirmed that the particles can accumulate efficiently in tumor area to induce effective T1 signal alteration...
  34. pmc Affibody-based nanoprobes for HER2-expressing cell and tumor imaging
    Jinhao Gao
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, School of Medicine, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road, Lucas P095, Stanford, CA 94305 5484, USA
    Biomaterials 32:2141-8. 2011
    ..This work indicated the nanoparticle-affibody conjugates may be excellent candidates as targeting probes for molecular imaging and diagnosis...
  35. pmc Near-infrared fluorescent deoxyglucose analogue for tumor optical imaging in cell culture and living mice
    Zhen Cheng
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, 94305 5344, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 17:662-9. 2006
    ..To develop NIR glucose analogues with the ability to target GLUTs/hexokinase, it is highly important to select NIR dyes with a reasonable molecular size...
  36. doi 177Lu-DO3A-HSA-Z EGFR:1907: characterization as a potential radiopharmaceutical for radionuclide therapy of EGFR-expressing head and neck carcinomas
    Susan Hoppmann
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Biol Inorg Chem 17:709-18. 2012
    ..5 ± 1.08 % ID/g) at 72 h after injection. (177)Lu-DO3A-HSA-Z(EGFR:1907) shows promising in vivo profiles and may be a potential radiopharmaceutical for radionuclide therapy of EGFR-expressing head and neck carcinomas...
  37. pmc Non-invasive imaging of cysteine cathepsin activity in solid tumors using a 64Cu-labeled activity-based probe
    Gang Ren
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e28029. 2011
    ..Overall, these results demonstrate that small molecule activity-based probes carrying radio-tracers can be used to image protease activity in living subjects...
  38. pmc PET imaging of tumor neovascularization in a transgenic mouse model with a novel 64Cu-DOTA-knottin peptide
    Carsten H Nielsen
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Division of Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5427, USA
    Cancer Res 70:9022-30. 2010
    ..Collectively, these results show 64Cu-DOTA-knottin 2.5F to be a promising candidate for clinical translation for earlier detection and improved characterization of lung cancer...
  39. pmc Radiofluorinated rhenium cyclized α-MSH analogues for PET imaging of melanocortin receptor 1
    Gang Ren
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Stanford University, Stanford, California, 94305 5344, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 21:2355-60. 2010
    ..F-FP-RMSH-1 demonstrates significant advantages over ¹⁸F-FB-RMSH-1 and ¹⁸F-FP-RMSH-2. It is a promising PET probe for imaging MC1R positive melanoma and MC1R expression in vivo...
  40. ncbi microPET imaging of glioma integrin {alpha}v{beta}3 expression using (64)Cu-labeled tetrameric RGD peptide
    Yun Wu
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Nucl Med 46:1707-18. 2005
    ..Radiolabeled RGD peptides that are integrin specific can be used for noninvasive imaging of integrin expression level as well as for integrin-targeted radionuclide therapy...
  41. ncbi Proof-of-concept study of monitoring cancer drug therapy with cerenkov luminescence imaging
    Yingding Xu
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Nucl Med 53:312-7. 2012
    ..Two common radiotracers, 3'-deoxy-3'-(18)F-fluorothymidine ((18)F-FLT) and (18)F-FDG, were used to monitor bevacizumab treatment efficacy...
  42. ncbi Imaging chemically modified adenovirus for targeting tumors expressing integrin alphavbeta3 in living mice with mutant herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase PET reporter gene
    Zhengming Xiong
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, MIPS, Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5484, USA
    J Nucl Med 47:130-9. 2006
    ....
  43. ncbi In vivo bioluminescence tumor imaging of RGD peptide-modified adenoviral vector encoding firefly luciferase reporter gene
    Gang Niu
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Mol Imaging Biol 9:126-34. 2007
    ..The goal of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of chemically modified human adenovirus (Ad) vectors for tumor retargeting...
  44. pmc Effects of nanoparticle size on cellular uptake and liver MRI with polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated iron oxide nanoparticles
    Jing Huang
    Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road, P087, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    ACS Nano 4:7151-60. 2010
    ..These results will have implications in designing engineered nanoparticles that are optimized as MR contrast agents or for use in therapeutics...
  45. pmc Optical imaging of reporter gene expression using a positron-emission-tomography probe
    Hongguang Liu
    Stanford University, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Biomed Opt 15:060505. 2010
    ..OI with radioactive reporter probes will facilitate and broaden the applications of reporter gene∕reporter probe techniques in medical research...
  46. pmc Construction and validation of nano gold tripods for molecular imaging of living subjects
    Kai Cheng
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, School of Medicine, Stanford Nanocharacterization Laboratory, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road, Lucas P095, Stanford, California 94305 5484, United States
    J Am Chem Soc 136:3560-71. 2014
    ..Our study suggests that Au-tripods can be reliably synthesized through stringently controlled chemical synthesis and could serve as a new generation of platform with high selectivity and sensitivity for multimodality molecular imaging. ..
  47. pmc Optical imaging with her2-targeted affibody molecules can monitor hsp90 treatment response in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model
    Stephanie M W Y van de Ven
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Clin Cancer Res 18:1073-81. 2012
    ..For this, we evaluated the known Her2 response to 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin hydrochloride (17-DMAG) treatment, an Hsp90 inhibitor...
  48. pmc Targeted microbubbles for imaging tumor angiogenesis: assessment of whole-body biodistribution with dynamic micro-PET in mice
    Jurgen K Willmann
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, James H Clark Center, 318 Campus Dr, East Wing, 1st Floor, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Radiology 249:212-9. 2008
    ....
  49. ncbi Fluorescent fructose derivatives for imaging breast cancer cells
    Jelena Levi
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 18:628-34. 2007
    ..5 likely introduces big structural and electronic changes, leading to a fructose derivative that does not accurately describe the uptake of fructose in cells...
  50. ncbi Reproducibility of 3'-deoxy-3'-(18)F-fluorothymidine microPET studies in tumor xenografts in mice
    Jeffrey R Tseng
    Molecular Imaging Program of Stanford, Bio X Program, and Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Nucl Med 46:1851-7. 2005
    ..The purpose of this study was to determine the reproducibility of (18)F-FLT microPET studies...
  51. pmc Macrocyclic chelator assembled RGD multimers for tumor targeting
    Xiaofen Zhang
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, California 94305, USA
    Bioorg Med Chem Lett 21:3423-6. 2011
    ..A widely used chelator, DOTA, has been explored as a molecular platform to assemble multiple bioactive peptides in this paper. The multivalent DOTA-peptide bioconjugates demonstrate promising tumor targeting ability...
  52. ncbi One-step radiosynthesis of ¹⁸F-AlF-NOTA-RGD₂ for tumor angiogenesis PET imaging
    Shuanglong Liu
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Bio X Program, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road, Lucas Expansion, P095, Stanford, CA 94305 5344, USA
    Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 38:1732-41. 2011
    ....
  53. pmc Tyrosinase as a multifunctional reporter gene for Photoacoustic/MRI/PET triple modality molecular imaging
    Chunxia Qin
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Sci Rep 3:1490. 2013
    ..Our study demonstrates that TYR gene can be utilized as a multifunctional reporter gene for PAI/MRI/PET both in vitro and in vivo...
  54. ncbi microPET-based biodistribution of quantum dots in living mice
    Meike L Schipper
    Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering, Bio X Program, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Stanford University, East 150 Clark Center, Palo Alto, CA 94305, USA
    J Nucl Med 48:1511-8. 2007
    ..This study evaluates the quantitative biodistribution of commercially available CdSe quantum dots (QD) in mice...
  55. pmc Affibody modified and radiolabeled gold-iron oxide hetero-nanostructures for tumor PET, optical and MR imaging
    Meng Yang
    Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730, China
    Biomaterials 34:2796-806. 2013
    ..Our study data also highlighted the EGFR targeting efficiency of hetero-nanoparticles and the feasibility for their further theranostic applications...
  56. pmc Activatable near-infrared fluorescent probe for in vivo imaging of fibroblast activation protein-alpha
    Jinbo Li
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology, and Bio X Program, Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5344, USA
    Bioconjug Chem 23:1704-11. 2012
    ..Ex vivo imaging also demonstrated ANP(FAP) had high tumor uptake at 4 h post injection. Collectively, these results indicated that ANP(FAP) could serve as a useful NIR optical probe for early detection of FAPα expressing tumors...
  57. pmc Ultrasmall near-infrared non-cadmium quantum dots for in vivo tumor imaging
    Jinhao Gao
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5484, USA
    Small 6:256-61. 2010
    ..QD800-MPA-HSA may have great potential for in vivo fluorescence imaging...
  58. ncbi Imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma patient-derived xenografts using ⁸⁹Zr-labeled anti-glypican-3 monoclonal antibody
    Xiaoyang Yang
    Asian Liver Center, Department of Surgery, Stanford University, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Biomaterials 35:6964-71. 2014
    ..64, 2.78 ± 0.26, and 2.31 ± 0.38 at 168 h p.i. Thus, (89)Zr-DFO-1G12 is a highly translatable probe for the specific and high contrast imaging of GPC3-positive HCCs, which may aid early detection of HCC to allow timely intervention...
  59. doi Image-guided resection of malignant gliomas using fluorescent nanoparticles
    Xinhui Su
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology, Bio X Program and Stanford Cancer Center, Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Wiley Interdiscip Rev Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 5:219-32. 2013
    ..Moreover, photoacoustic imaging is a promising molecular imaging modality, and its potential applications for brain tumor imaging are also briefly discussed...
  60. pmc A novel aliphatic 18F-labeled probe for PET imaging of melanoma
    Hongguang Liu
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Bio X Program, and Department of Radiology, Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Stanford University, California, 94305 5344, United States
    Mol Pharm 10:3384-91. 2013
    ..Further evaluation and optimization of (18)F-FPDA for melanin targeted molecular imaging are therefore warranted. ..
  61. ncbi Human serum albumin conjugated biomolecules for cancer molecular imaging
    Meng Yang
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Curr Pharm Des 18:1023-31. 2012
    ..This review gives a brief account of albumin-based molecular probes, focusing on their applications in cancer molecular imaging, such as PET/SPECT, MRI and optical imaging...
  62. pmc Radioluminescent nanophosphors enable multiplexed small-animal imaging
    Colin M Carpenter
    Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Opt Express 20:11598-604. 2012
    ..Combined with the high-resolution potential of low-scattering X-ray excitation, this imaging technique may be a promising method to probe molecular processes in living organisms...
  63. doi In vivo near-infrared fluorescence imaging of cancer with nanoparticle-based probes
    Xiaoxiao He
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology, Bio X Program and Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Wiley Interdiscip Rev Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2:349-66. 2010
    ....
  64. ncbi Preclinical evaluation of Raman nanoparticle biodistribution for their potential use in clinical endoscopy imaging
    Cristina L Zavaleta
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, 318 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Small 7:2232-40. 2011
    ....
  65. ncbi Optical imaging of articular cartilage degeneration using near-infrared dipicolylamine probes
    Xiang Hu
    Department of Orthopedics, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, China Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Rd, Lucas Expansion, P095, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Biomaterials 35:7511-21. 2014
    ..In summary, Cy5-DPA-Zn provides promising visual detection for early cartilage pathological degeneration in living subjects. ..
  66. doi Real-time intravital imaging of RGD-quantum dot binding to luminal endothelium in mouse tumor neovasculature
    Bryan Ronain Smith
    The Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nano Lett 8:2599-606. 2008
    ..Equally vital, the work provides a platform by which to design and optimize molecularly targeted nanoparticles including quantum dots for applications in living subjects...
  67. doi Evaluation of 89Zr-rituximab tracer by Cerenkov luminescence imaging and correlation with PET in a humanized transgenic mouse model to image NHL
    Arutselvan Natarajan
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, James H Clark Center, 318 Campus Drive, E153, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Imaging Biol 15:468-75. 2013
    ....
  68. pmc Development of 18F-labeled picolinamide probes for PET imaging of malignant melanoma
    Hongguang Liu
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Bio X Program, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, California, 94305 5344, USA
    J Med Chem 56:895-901. 2013
    ..Collectively, these findings suggest (18)F-2 as a highly promising PET probe for translation into clinical detection of melanoma...
  69. pmc Protein scaffold-based molecular probes for cancer molecular imaging
    Zheng Miao
    Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, CA 94305 5344, USA
    Amino Acids 41:1037-47. 2011
    ..High tumor contrast imaging has been obtained within 1 h after injection. The success of those molecular probes demonstrates the adequacy of protein scaffold strategy as a general approach in molecular probe development...
  70. pmc Near-infrared fluorescent nanoprobes for cancer molecular imaging: status and challenges
    Xiaoxiao He
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology, Bio X Program and Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Trends Mol Med 16:574-83. 2010
    ....
  71. ncbi Molecular probes for malignant melanoma imaging
    Gang Ren
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5344, USA
    Curr Pharm Biotechnol 11:590-602. 2010
    ..In this review, these molecular probes targeting diverse melanoma biomarkers have been summarized. Some of them may eventually contribute to the improvement of personalized management of malignant melanoma...
  72. pmc Visualizing implanted tumors in mice with magnetic resonance imaging using magnetotactic bacteria
    Michael R Benoit
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5124, USA
    Clin Cancer Res 15:5170-7. 2009
    ..To determine if magnetotactic bacteria can target tumors in mice and provide positive contrast for visualization using magnetic resonance imaging...
  73. pmc Near-infrared quantum dots as optical probes for tumor imaging
    Jinhao Gao
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, School of Medicine, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, CA 94305 5484, USA
    Curr Top Med Chem 10:1147-57. 2010
    ..We will also discuss the benefits, challenges, limitations, perspective, and the future scope of NIR-emitting QDs for tumor imaging applications...
  74. pmc Continuous sensing of tumor-targeted molecular probes with a vertical cavity surface emitting laser-based biosensor
    Natesh Parashurama
    Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, James H Clark Center, 318 Campus Drive, E153, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Biomed Opt 17:117004. 2012
    ..We conclude that our novel, portable, precise biosensor can be used to evaluate both kinetics and steady state levels of molecular probes in various disease applications...
  75. ncbi Reproducibility study of [(18)F]FPP(RGD)2 uptake in murine models of human tumor xenografts
    Edwin Chang
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road, Lucas Center, P020A, Stanford, CA 94305 5484, USA
    Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 38:722-30. 2011
    ..The purpose of this study was to determine the reproducibility of the integrin α(v)β(3)-targeted PET probe, [(18)F]FPP(RGD)(2,) using small animal PET...
  76. ncbi Bisdeoxycoelenterazine derivatives for improvement of bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays
    Jelena Levi
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS, Department of Radiology, Bio X Program, Stanford University, 318 Campus Drive, E 150, Stanford, California 94305 5427, USA
    J Am Chem Soc 129:11900-1. 2007
  77. ncbi A new strategy to screen molecular imaging probe uptake in cell culture without radiolabeling using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry
    Zhen Cheng
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, and Bio X Program, Stanford University, 318 Campus Drive, Clark Center E 150, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Nucl Med 46:878-86. 2005
    ..Specifically, MALDI-TOF-MS was used to screen a small library of phosphonium cations for their ability to accumulate in cells...
  78. pmc The manipulation of natural killer cells to target tumor sites using magnetic nanoparticles
    Eue Soon Jang
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford MIPS and Bio X Program, Department of Radiology, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Rd, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Biomaterials 33:5584-92. 2012
    ..This approach allows us to open alternative clinical treatment with reduced toxicity of the nanoparticles and enhanced infiltration of immunology to the target site...
  79. doi Harnessing the power of radionuclides for optical imaging: Cerenkov luminescence imaging
    Yingding Xu
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology and Bio X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Nucl Med 52:2009-18. 2011
    ....
  80. ncbi [99mTcOAADT]-(CH2)2-NEt2: a potential small-molecule single-photon emission computed tomography probe for imaging metastatic melanoma
    Zhen Cheng
    Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Cancer Res 65:4979-86. 2005
    ..These in vivo studies coupled with additional in vitro and ex vivo assessment show that 99mTc-1 has high and specific uptake in melanoma metastases in lungs and can potentially follow the temporal growth of these tumors...
  81. pmc Affibody-functionalized gold-silica nanoparticles for Raman molecular imaging of the epidermal growth factor receptor
    Jesse V Jokerst
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Small 7:625-33. 2011
    ..Validation via competitive inhibition reduces the signal by a factor of six, and independent measurement of EGFR via flow cytometry correlates at R(2) = 0.92...
  82. doi Adipose tissue-derived stem cells display a proangiogenic phenotype on 3D scaffolds
    Evgenios A Neofytou
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, California, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res A 98:383-93. 2011
    ..This can potentially help us to surpass the tissue thickness limitations faced by the tissue engineering community today...

Research Grants4

  1. VEGFR-2 Targeted Imaging
    Zhen Cheng; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..The success of this project will allow translation of the new imaging probe into clinic for lesion detection and monitoring therapeutic response. ..
  2. Radiolabeled RGD Peptides for Breast Cancer Imaging and Therapy
    Zhen Cheng; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..The same ligands labeled with therapeutic isotopes will allow targeted internal radiotherapy of integrin positive tumors. ..
  3. VEGFR-2 Targeted Imaging
    Zhen Cheng; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..The success of this project will allow translation of the new imaging probe into clinic for lesion detection and monitoring therapeutic response. ..
  4. Radiolabeled RGD Peptides for Breast Cancer Imaging and Therapy
    Zhen Cheng; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..The same ligands labeled with therapeutic isotopes will allow targeted internal radiotherapy of integrin positive tumors. ..