Christopher P Cheng

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint In vivo MR angiographic quantification of axial and twisting deformations of the superficial femoral artery resulting from maximum hip and knee flexion
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    J Vasc Interv Radiol 17:979-87. 2006
  2. pmc The effect of aging on deformations of the superficial femoral artery resulting from hip and knee flexion: potential clinical implications
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Clark Center, Room E350, Stanford, CA 94305 5431, USA
    J Vasc Interv Radiol 21:195-202. 2010
  3. doi request reprint Relative lung perfusion distribution in normal lung scans: observations and clinical implications
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Congenit Heart Dis 1:210-6. 2006
  4. ncbi request reprint Proximal pulmonary artery blood flow characteristics in healthy subjects measured in an upright posture using MRI: the effects of exercise and age
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 4038, USA
    J Magn Reson Imaging 21:752-8. 2005
  5. ncbi request reprint Blood flow conditions in the proximal pulmonary arteries and vena cavae: healthy children during upright cycling exercise
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 4038, USA
    Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 287:H921-6. 2004
  6. pmc In vivo deformation of the human abdominal aorta and common iliac arteries with hip and knee flexion: implications for the design of stent-grafts
    Gilwoo Choi
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5431, USA
    J Endovasc Ther 16:531-8. 2009
  7. ncbi request reprint Abdominal aortic hemodynamics in young healthy adults at rest and during lower limb exercise: quantification using image-based computer modeling
    Beverly T Tang
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5431, USA
    Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 291:H668-76. 2006
  8. ncbi request reprint Abdominal aortic hemodynamic conditions in healthy subjects aged 50-70 at rest and during lower limb exercise: in vivo quantification using MRI
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Standford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Atherosclerosis 168:323-31. 2003
  9. pmc Hemodynamic changes quantified in abdominal aortic aneurysms with increasing exercise intensity using mr exercise imaging and image-based computational fluid dynamics
    Ga Young Suh
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 39:2186-202. 2011
  10. ncbi request reprint Inferior vena caval hemodynamics quantified in vivo at rest and during cycling exercise using magnetic resonance imaging
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 3030, USA
    Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 284:H1161-7. 2003

Detail Information

Publications20

  1. ncbi request reprint In vivo MR angiographic quantification of axial and twisting deformations of the superficial femoral artery resulting from maximum hip and knee flexion
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    J Vasc Interv Radiol 17:979-87. 2006
    ....
  2. pmc The effect of aging on deformations of the superficial femoral artery resulting from hip and knee flexion: potential clinical implications
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Clark Center, Room E350, Stanford, CA 94305 5431, USA
    J Vasc Interv Radiol 21:195-202. 2010
    ..The purpose of this study is to describe geometric changes of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) resulting from hip and knee flexion in older subjects...
  3. doi request reprint Relative lung perfusion distribution in normal lung scans: observations and clinical implications
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Congenit Heart Dis 1:210-6. 2006
    ..These values of normal relative perfusion will be useful for establishing what is abnormal and for clinical decisions related to various pulmonary vascular diseases...
  4. ncbi request reprint Proximal pulmonary artery blood flow characteristics in healthy subjects measured in an upright posture using MRI: the effects of exercise and age
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 4038, USA
    J Magn Reson Imaging 21:752-8. 2005
    ..To use MRI to quantify blood flow conditions in the proximal pulmonary arteries of healthy children and adults at rest and during exercise in an upright posture...
  5. ncbi request reprint Blood flow conditions in the proximal pulmonary arteries and vena cavae: healthy children during upright cycling exercise
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 4038, USA
    Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 287:H921-6. 2004
    ..During seated rest, the SVC-to-IVC venous return ratio is 50/50%. With light/moderate cycling exercise, IVC flow increases by threefold, whereas SVC remains essentially constant...
  6. pmc In vivo deformation of the human abdominal aorta and common iliac arteries with hip and knee flexion: implications for the design of stent-grafts
    Gilwoo Choi
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5431, USA
    J Endovasc Ther 16:531-8. 2009
    ..To quantify in vivo deformations of the abdominal aorta and common iliac arteries (CIAs) caused by musculoskeletal motion...
  7. ncbi request reprint Abdominal aortic hemodynamics in young healthy adults at rest and during lower limb exercise: quantification using image-based computer modeling
    Beverly T Tang
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5431, USA
    Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 291:H668-76. 2006
    ....
  8. ncbi request reprint Abdominal aortic hemodynamic conditions in healthy subjects aged 50-70 at rest and during lower limb exercise: in vivo quantification using MRI
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Standford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Atherosclerosis 168:323-31. 2003
    ..6+/-2.2 years). Compared to the younger subjects, the older subjects also experienced greater increases in mean wall shear stress and greater decreases in wall shear stress oscillations from rest to exercise...
  9. pmc Hemodynamic changes quantified in abdominal aortic aneurysms with increasing exercise intensity using mr exercise imaging and image-based computational fluid dynamics
    Ga Young Suh
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 39:2186-202. 2011
    ..22 ± 0.06 s at rest, mild exercise, and moderate exercise levels, respectively. Most of the reduction of PRT occurred from rest to the mild exercise level, suggesting that mild exercise may be sufficient to reduce flow stasis in AAAs...
  10. ncbi request reprint Inferior vena caval hemodynamics quantified in vivo at rest and during cycling exercise using magnetic resonance imaging
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 3030, USA
    Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 284:H1161-7. 2003
    ..The hemodynamic and anatomic data of the IVC acquired in this study add to our understanding of the venous circulation and may be useful in a clinical setting...
  11. pmc Quantification of particle residence time in abdominal aortic aneurysms using magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics
    Ga Young Suh
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, 318 Stanford Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 39:864-83. 2011
    ..We postulate that augmentation of mean infrarenal flow during exercise may reduce chronic flow stasis that may influence mural thrombus burden, degradation of the vessel wall, and aneurysm growth...
  12. ncbi request reprint Quantification of wall shear stress in large blood vessels using Lagrangian interpolation functions with cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 30:1020-32. 2002
    ..We quantified the shear stress at the supraceliac and infrarenal regions of a human abdominal aorta to be 3.4 and 2.3 dyn/cm2, respectively...
  13. doi request reprint Methods for quantifying three-dimensional deformation of arteries due to pulsatile and nonpulsatile forces: implications for the design of stents and stent grafts
    Gilwoo Choi
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5431, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 37:14-33. 2009
    ..The proposed methods may aid in designing preclinical tests aimed at replicating dynamic in vivo conditions in the arterial tree for the purpose of developing more durable endovascular devices including stents and stent grafts...
  14. ncbi request reprint In vivo quantification of blood flow and wall shear stress in the human abdominal aorta during lower limb exercise
    Charles A Taylor
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University, CA, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 30:402-8. 2002
    ..5 +/- 0.8 dyn/cm2 at rest to 6.2 +/- 0.5 dyn/cm2 during exercise (p<0.0005) and increased in the infrarenal aorta from 1.3 +/- 0.8 dyn/cm2 at rest to 5.2 +/- 1.3 dyn/cm2 during exercise (p<0.0005)...
  15. ncbi request reprint Dynamic exercise imaging with an MR-compatible stationary cycle within the general electric open magnet
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, California, USA
    Magn Reson Med 49:581-5. 2003
    ..An exercise workload of 47.9 W was achieved. His heart rate increased from 52 to 78 bpm, supraceliac flow increased from 1.7 to 3.7 L/min, and infrarenal flow increased from 0.4 to 3.2 L/min from rest to exercise...
  16. pmc Respiration-induced deformations of the superior mesenteric and renal arteries in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms
    Ga Young Suh
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5642, USA
    J Vasc Interv Radiol 24:1035-42. 2013
    ..To quantify respiration-induced deformations of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), left renal artery (LRA), and right renal artery (RRA) in patients with small abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs)...
  17. pmc Respiratory-induced 3D deformations of the renal arteries quantified with geometric modeling during inspiration and expiration breath-holds of magnetic resonance angiography
    Ga Young Suh
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    J Magn Reson Imaging 38:1325-32. 2013
    ..To quantify renal artery deformation due to respiration using magnetic resonance (MR) image-based geometric analysis...
  18. pmc Quantifying in vivo hemodynamic response to exercise in patients with intermittent claudication and abdominal aortic aneurysms using cine phase-contrast MRI
    Adam S Tenforde
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Magn Reson Imaging 31:425-9. 2010
    ..To evaluate rest and exercise hemodynamics in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) and peripheral occlusive disease (claudicants) using phase-contrast MRI...
  19. ncbi request reprint Comparison of abdominal aortic hemodynamics between men and women at rest and during lower limb exercise
    Christopher P Cheng
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Vasc Surg 37:118-23. 2003
    ..However, the hemodynamics of men and women have not been compared at this location at rest or during lower limb exercise conditions...
  20. doi request reprint Biomechanical response of stented carotid arteries to swallowing and neck motion
    Scott W Robertson
    Nitinol Devices and Components, Fremont, CA, USA
    J Endovasc Ther 15:663-71. 2008
    ..To examine the effects of swallowing and side-to-side head turning on stents in the internal carotid artery...