L D Butler

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Hypnosis reduces distress and duration of an invasive medical procedure for children
    Lisa D Butler
    Department of Psychiatry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Pediatrics 115:e77-85. 2005
  2. ncbi request reprint Traumatic stress, life events, and emotional support in women with metastatic breast cancer: cancer-related traumatic stress symptoms associated with past and current stressors
    L D Butler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5718, USA
    Health Psychol 18:555-60. 1999
  3. ncbi request reprint Normative dissociation
    Lisa D Butler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, 2320, Stanford, CA 94035 5718, USA
    Psychiatr Clin North Am 29:45-62, viii. 2006
  4. ncbi request reprint Anticipating loss and other temporal stressors predict traumatic stress symptoms among partners of metastatic/recurrent breast cancer patients
    Lisa D Butler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Room 2320, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Psychooncology 14:492-502. 2005
  5. ncbi request reprint Psychological distress and pain significantly increase before death in metastatic breast cancer patients
    Lisa D Butler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5718, USA
    Psychosom Med 65:416-26. 2003
  6. doi request reprint Effects of supportive-expressive group therapy on pain in women with metastatic breast cancer
    Lisa D Butler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, USA
    Health Psychol 28:579-87. 2009
  7. ncbi request reprint Supportive-expressive group therapy and distress in patients with metastatic breast cancer: a randomized clinical intervention trial
    C Classen
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94131 5718, USA
    Arch Gen Psychiatry 58:494-501. 2001
  8. ncbi request reprint Hypnotizability and traumatic experience: a diathesis-stress model of dissociative symptomatology
    L D Butler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Calif, USA
    Am J Psychiatry 153:42-63. 1996
  9. ncbi request reprint Relationships of perceived stress to coping, attachment and social support among HIV-positive persons
    C Koopman
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    AIDS Care 12:663-72. 2000
  10. ncbi request reprint Sleep disturbances in women with metastatic breast cancer
    Cheryl Koopman
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Breast J 8:362-70. 2002

Detail Information

Publications24

  1. ncbi request reprint Hypnosis reduces distress and duration of an invasive medical procedure for children
    Lisa D Butler
    Department of Psychiatry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Pediatrics 115:e77-85. 2005
    ..This study was designed to examine whether relaxation and analgesia facilitated with hypnosis could reduce distress and procedure time for children who undergo this procedure...
  2. ncbi request reprint Traumatic stress, life events, and emotional support in women with metastatic breast cancer: cancer-related traumatic stress symptoms associated with past and current stressors
    L D Butler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5718, USA
    Health Psychol 18:555-60. 1999
    ..These results indicate that metastatic breast cancer is an emotionally traumatic event for a significant proportion of women, particularly those with past life stressors and unsupportive social environments...
  3. ncbi request reprint Normative dissociation
    Lisa D Butler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, 2320, Stanford, CA 94035 5718, USA
    Psychiatr Clin North Am 29:45-62, viii. 2006
  4. ncbi request reprint Anticipating loss and other temporal stressors predict traumatic stress symptoms among partners of metastatic/recurrent breast cancer patients
    Lisa D Butler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Room 2320, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Psychooncology 14:492-502. 2005
    ..Limitations and treatment implications of the present research and directions for future research are discussed...
  5. ncbi request reprint Psychological distress and pain significantly increase before death in metastatic breast cancer patients
    Lisa D Butler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5718, USA
    Psychosom Med 65:416-26. 2003
    ..It was hypothesized that psychological distress would increase significantly before death independent of changes in pain...
  6. doi request reprint Effects of supportive-expressive group therapy on pain in women with metastatic breast cancer
    Lisa D Butler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, USA
    Health Psychol 28:579-87. 2009
    ..To examine whether a group intervention including hypnosis can reduce cancer pain and trait hypnotizability would moderate these effects...
  7. ncbi request reprint Supportive-expressive group therapy and distress in patients with metastatic breast cancer: a randomized clinical intervention trial
    C Classen
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94131 5718, USA
    Arch Gen Psychiatry 58:494-501. 2001
    ....
  8. ncbi request reprint Hypnotizability and traumatic experience: a diathesis-stress model of dissociative symptomatology
    L D Butler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Calif, USA
    Am J Psychiatry 153:42-63. 1996
    ..The authors propose a diathesis-stress model to describe how pathological dissociation may arise from an interaction between innate hypnotizability and traumatic experience...
  9. ncbi request reprint Relationships of perceived stress to coping, attachment and social support among HIV-positive persons
    C Koopman
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    AIDS Care 12:663-72. 2000
    ....
  10. ncbi request reprint Sleep disturbances in women with metastatic breast cancer
    Cheryl Koopman
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Breast J 8:362-70. 2002
    ..These results suggest that women with metastatic breast cancer who are at higher risk for having sleeping problems are those who are less educated, in pain, depressed, have bony metastases, or lack social support...
  11. ncbi request reprint Acute stress reactions following the assassination of Mexican presidential candidate Colosio
    Jose R Maldonado
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, California 94305 5718, USA
    J Trauma Stress 15:401-5. 2002
    ....
  12. ncbi request reprint Meditation with yoga, group therapy with hypnosis, and psychoeducation for long-term depressed mood: a randomized pilot trial
    Lisa D Butler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 571, USA
    J Clin Psychol 64:806-20. 2008
    ..Although all groups reported some reduction in symptom levels, they did not differ significantly in that outcome. Overall, these results suggest that these two interventions show promise for treating low- to moderate-level depression...
  13. ncbi request reprint Effects of supportive-expressive group therapy on survival of patients with metastatic breast cancer: a randomized prospective trial
    David Spiegel
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Cancer 110:1130-8. 2007
    ..Subsequent findings concerning the question of whether such psychosocial support affects survival have been mixed...
  14. pmc Hypnotizability, posttraumatic stress, and depressive symptoms in metastatic breast cancer
    Alex S Keuroghlian
    Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Int J Clin Exp Hypn 58:39-52. 2010
    ..The authors relate these results to findings in other clinical populations and discuss implications for the psychosocial treatment of metastatic breast cancer...
  15. ncbi request reprint Change in emotion-regulation strategy for women with metastatic breast cancer following supportive-expressive group therapy
    Janine Giese-Davis
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5718, USA
    J Consult Clin Psychol 70:916-25. 2002
    ..Even though these aspects of emotion-regulation appear trait-like within the control group, significant change was observed with treatment...
  16. ncbi request reprint Traumatic stress symptoms among women with recently diagnosed primary breast cancer
    Cheryl Koopman
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, California 94305 5718, USA
    J Trauma Stress 15:277-87. 2002
    ..Furthermore, these results suggest women at greatest risk are those who are younger, who receive postsurgical cancer treatment, who are low in emotional self-efficacy and whose lives are most affected by having cancer...
  17. ncbi request reprint Psychosocial intervention for lesbians with primary breast cancer
    Pat Fobair
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Psychooncology 11:427-38. 2002
    ..There were no changes in body image, sexuality, or attitudes toward health-care providers. These results suggest that Supportive/Expressive group intervention appears to be helpful for lesbians with breast cancer...
  18. ncbi request reprint Relationships of dissociation and childhood abuse and neglect with heart rate in delinquent adolescents
    Cheryl Koopman
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5718, USA
    J Trauma Stress 17:47-54. 2004
    ..D. Bremner, 1999) that dissociative symptoms comprise one of two subtypes of the acute stress response, differing physiologically as well as subjectively from a predominantly hyperarousal or intrusive symptom response...
  19. doi request reprint Psychosocial predictors of resilience after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks
    Lisa D Butler
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Nerv Ment Dis 197:266-73. 2009
    ..These findings highlight the role of emotional, coping, social support, and particularly, cognitive variables in adjustment after terrorism...
  20. ncbi request reprint Self-efficacy, coping, and difficulties interacting with health care professionals among women living with breast cancer in rural communities
    K Collie
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5718, USA
    Psychooncology 14:901-12; discussion 913-4. 2005
    ..Further research is needed to identify possible causal relationships related to these findings and to determine what interventions might be warranted to improve medical interactions for women with breast cancer living in rural areas...
  21. ncbi request reprint Evidence for a dissociative subtype of post-traumatic stress disorder among help-seeking childhood sexual abuse survivors
    Karni Ginzburg
    Bob Shappel School of Social Work, Tel Aviv, 69978, Israel
    J Trauma Dissociation 7:7-27. 2006
    ..These results provide support for a dissociative subtype of PTSD that may stem from more severe childhood experiences of neglect and abuse...
  22. pmc Stress history and breast cancer recurrence
    Oxana Palesh
    University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642, USA
    J Psychosom Res 63:233-9. 2007
    ..There is mixed evidence regarding the possible association between a history of stressful or traumatic life events and more rapid breast cancer progression...
  23. pmc A longitudinal study of depression, pain, and stress as predictors of sleep disturbance among women with metastatic breast cancer
    Oxana Gronskaya Palesh
    University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642, United States
    Biol Psychol 75:37-44. 2007
    ..The present study examined depression, pain, life stress, and participation in group therapy in relation to sleep disturbances in a sample of women with metastatic breast cancer...
  24. ncbi request reprint Practitioner review: clinical applications of pediatric hypnosis
    Jeffrey I Gold
    Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90027 6062, USA
    J Child Psychol Psychiatry 48:744-54. 2007
    ..Over the past quarter century, hypnosis has been employed in a broad range of pediatric clinical settings; however, its efficacy and feasibility as a treatment approach for children and adolescents remain in question...