J D Brooks

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Distinctive gene expression of prostatic stromal cells cultured from diseased versus normal tissues
    Hongjuan Zhao
    Department of Urology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Cell Physiol 210:111-21. 2007
  2. pmc A tri-marker proliferation index predicts biochemical recurrence after surgery for prostate cancer
    Sameer Malhotra
    Department of Urology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e20293. 2011
  3. pmc Translational genomics: the challenge of developing cancer biomarkers
    James D Brooks
    Department of Urology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Genome Res 22:183-7. 2012
  4. pmc Intrinsic androgen-dependent gene expression patterns revealed by comparison of genital fibroblasts from normal males and individuals with complete and partial androgen insensitivity syndrome
    Paul Martin Holterhus
    Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Campus Kiel, Schwanenweg 20, Kiel, Germany
    BMC Genomics 8:376. 2007
  5. pmc Modest induction of phase 2 enzyme activity in the F-344 rat prostate
    Sunita B Jones
    Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    BMC Cancer 6:62. 2006
  6. ncbi request reprint Microarray analysis in prostate cancer research
    James D Brooks
    Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Curr Opin Urol 12:395-9. 2002
  7. pmc Transcriptional programs activated by exposure of human prostate cancer cells to androgen
    Samuel E DePrimo
    Department of Urology, Room S 287, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Genome Biol 3:RESEARCH0032. 2002
  8. ncbi request reprint Anatomy of the rectourethralis muscle
    James D Brooks
    Department of Urology, Stanford University Medical Center, CA 94305 5118, USA
    Eur Urol 41:94-100. 2002
  9. ncbi request reprint Potent induction of phase 2 enzymes in human prostate cells by sulforaphane
    J D Brooks
    Department of Urology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305 5118, USA
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 10:949-54. 2001
  10. ncbi request reprint Vascular invasion predicts recurrence after radical prostatectomy: stratification of risk based on pathologic variables
    Michelle K Ferrari
    Department of Urology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Urology 64:749-53. 2004

Detail Information

Publications62

  1. pmc Distinctive gene expression of prostatic stromal cells cultured from diseased versus normal tissues
    Hongjuan Zhao
    Department of Urology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Cell Physiol 210:111-21. 2007
    ..Our results support the hypothesis that prostatic stromal cells of different origin have unique transcriptional programs and point towards genes involved in actions of stromal cells in BPH and CA...
  2. pmc A tri-marker proliferation index predicts biochemical recurrence after surgery for prostate cancer
    Sameer Malhotra
    Department of Urology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e20293. 2011
    ..Our findings highlight the potential value of a multi-gene signature-based diagnostic, and define a tri-marker proliferation index with possible utility for improved prognostication and treatment stratification in prostate cancer...
  3. pmc Translational genomics: the challenge of developing cancer biomarkers
    James D Brooks
    Department of Urology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Genome Res 22:183-7. 2012
    ..Organized efforts by interdisciplinary teams will spur progress in cancer diagnostics...
  4. pmc Intrinsic androgen-dependent gene expression patterns revealed by comparison of genital fibroblasts from normal males and individuals with complete and partial androgen insensitivity syndrome
    Paul Martin Holterhus
    Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Campus Kiel, Schwanenweg 20, Kiel, Germany
    BMC Genomics 8:376. 2007
    ....
  5. pmc Modest induction of phase 2 enzyme activity in the F-344 rat prostate
    Sunita B Jones
    Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    BMC Cancer 6:62. 2006
    ..We tested whether carcinogen defense (phase 2) enzymes could be induced in the prostate tissues of rats after oral feeding of candidate phase 2 enzyme inducing compounds...
  6. ncbi request reprint Microarray analysis in prostate cancer research
    James D Brooks
    Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Curr Opin Urol 12:395-9. 2002
    ..This review provides a background on microarray technology, reviews recent applications of these techniques in prostate cancer research, and discusses the potential application of this technology to patient care...
  7. pmc Transcriptional programs activated by exposure of human prostate cancer cells to androgen
    Samuel E DePrimo
    Department of Urology, Room S 287, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Genome Biol 3:RESEARCH0032. 2002
    ..We used DNA microarrays, representing approximately 18,000 genes, to examine the temporal program of gene expression following treatment of the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP with a synthetic androgen...
  8. ncbi request reprint Anatomy of the rectourethralis muscle
    James D Brooks
    Department of Urology, Stanford University Medical Center, CA 94305 5118, USA
    Eur Urol 41:94-100. 2002
    ..To define the true anatomic structure of the rectourethralis muscle...
  9. ncbi request reprint Potent induction of phase 2 enzymes in human prostate cells by sulforaphane
    J D Brooks
    Department of Urology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305 5118, USA
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 10:949-54. 2001
    ..This induction is accompanied by, but not because of, increased intracellular glutathione synthesis. Our findings may help explain the observed inverse correlation between consumption of cruciferae and prostate cancer risk...
  10. ncbi request reprint Vascular invasion predicts recurrence after radical prostatectomy: stratification of risk based on pathologic variables
    Michelle K Ferrari
    Department of Urology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Urology 64:749-53. 2004
    ..To determine whether vascular invasion (VI) is an independent predictor of prostate cancer recurrence and/or survival and to stratify risk of recurrence in patients with VI...
  11. pmc Alteration of gene expression signatures of cortical differentiation and wound response in lethal clear cell renal cell carcinomas
    Hongjuan Zhao
    Department of Urology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    PLoS ONE 4:e6039. 2009
    ..Our findings suggest that critical biological features of lethal ccRCC include loss of normal cortical differentiation and activation of programs associated with wound healing...
  12. ncbi request reprint Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis and actions by genistein in human prostate cancer cells and by soy isoflavones in prostate cancer patients
    Srilatha Swami
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5103, USA
    Int J Cancer 124:2050-9. 2009
    ..We propose that the inhibition of the PG pathway contributes to the beneficial effect of soy isoflavones in PCa chemoprevention and/or treatment...
  13. ncbi request reprint Biochemical remission after resection of prostate cancer lung metastasis
    Debby H Chao
    Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Urology 63:584-5. 2004
    ..We present a case of a solitary pulmonary recurrence of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy that was resected, resulting in 12 years of biochemical remission without additional therapy...
  14. pmc Identification of candidate prostate cancer genes through comparative expression-profiling of seminal vesicle
    Maxwell Thompson
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5176, USA
    Prostate 68:1248-56. 2008
    ..We hypothesized that gene-expression differences between prostate and seminal vesicle might inform mechanisms underlying the higher incidence of prostate cancer...
  15. pmc Resveratrol-induced gene expression profiles in human prostate cancer cells
    Sunita B Jones
    Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 14:596-604. 2005
    ....
  16. pmc Diverse effects of methylseleninic acid on the transcriptional program of human prostate cancer cells
    Hongjuan Zhao
    Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Mol Biol Cell 15:506-19. 2004
    ..Our results suggest that MSA may protect against prostate cancer by inhibiting cell proliferation, by modulating the expression of AR and AR-regulated genes and by inducing carcinogen defenses...
  17. pmc Gene expression profiling predicts survival in conventional renal cell carcinoma
    Hongjuan Zhao
    Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS Med 3:e13. 2006
    ..Tumor stage, grade, and patient performance status are used currently to predict survival after surgery. Our goal was to identify gene expression features, using comprehensive gene expression profiling, that correlate with survival...
  18. pmc Gene expression patterns in renal cell carcinoma assessed by complementary DNA microarray
    John P T Higgins
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Am J Pathol 162:925-32. 2003
    ..Characterization of renal cell carcinomas based on gene expression patterns provides a revised classification of these tumors and has the potential to supply significant biological and clinical insights...
  19. ncbi request reprint Biochemical recurrence without PSA progression characterizes a subset of patients after radical prostatectomy. Prostate-specific antigen
    Rajesh Shinghal
    Department of Urology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California 94305 5118, USA
    Urology 61:380-5. 2003
    ..To characterize a subset of patients with biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy but with little, if any, subsequent rise in serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and no clinical progression during long-term follow-up...
  20. doi request reprint hCAP-D3 expression marks a prostate cancer subtype with favorable clinical behavior and androgen signaling signature
    Jacques Lapointe
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 51, USA
    Am J Surg Pathol 32:205-9. 2008
    ..019). Our findings identify hCAP-D3 as a new biomarker for subtype-1 tumors that improves prognostication, and reveal androgen signaling as an important biologic feature of this potentially clinically favorable molecular subtype...
  21. ncbi request reprint Genome-wide characterization of gene expression variations and DNA copy number changes in prostate cancer cell lines
    Hongjuan Zhao
    Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Prostate 63:187-97. 2005
    ..The aim of this study was to characterize gene expression and DNA copy number profiles in androgen sensitive (AS) and androgen insensitive (AI) prostate cancer cell lines on a genome-wide scale...
  22. pmc Increased expression of NuSAP in recurrent prostate cancer is mediated by E2F1
    Z G Gulzar
    Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5118, USA
    Oncogene 32:70-7. 2013
    ..NuSAP is a novel biomarker for prostate cancer recurrence after surgery and its overexpression appears to be driven in part by E2F1 activation...
  23. pmc Prostatic soy isoflavone concentrations exceed serum levels after dietary supplementation
    Christopher D Gardner
    Department of Medicine, Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University Medical School, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Prostate 69:719-26. 2009
    ..The effects of soy isoflavones on prostate cancer may be concentration-dependent. The impact of soy supplementation on isoflavone concentrations in prostate tissues and serum remain unclear...
  24. ncbi request reprint Stereotactic body radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer: interim results of a prospective phase II clinical trial
    Christopher R King
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Urologic Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 73:1043-8. 2009
    ..The radiobiology of prostate cancer favors a hypofractionated dose regimen. We report results of a prospective Phase II clinical trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localized prostate cancer...
  25. ncbi request reprint Polymorphisms in the androgen receptor and type II 5 alpha-reductase genes and prostate cancer prognosis
    Atsuko Shibata
    Department of Health Research and Policy, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5405, USA
    Prostate 52:269-78. 2002
    ..Cytosine-adenine-guanine repeat length of the androgen receptor gene and the A49T and V89L polymorphisms of the 5 alpha-reductase (SRD5A2) gene have been associated with prostate cancer...
  26. ncbi request reprint Expression of FKBP12 in benign and malignant vascular endothelium: an immunohistochemical study on conventional sections and tissue microarrays
    John P T Higgins
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, California, USA
    Am J Surg Pathol 27:58-64. 2003
    ..In addition, our findings may explain the toxic effects of FK506 on vascular endothelium of the kidney...
  27. ncbi request reprint Reliability of small amounts of cancer in prostate biopsies to reveal pathologic grade
    Christopher R King
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5847, USA
    Urology 67:1229-34. 2006
    ..Prostate biopsy findings are known to undergrade prostate cancer compared with the pathologic specimens yet remain the only grade guiding disease management...
  28. ncbi request reprint Postoperative prostate-specific antigen velocity independently predicts for failure of salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy
    Christopher R King
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 70:1472-7. 2008
    ..Identification of patients most likely to benefit from salvage radiotherapy (RT) using postoperative (postop) prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics...
  29. ncbi request reprint Preoperative PSA velocity is an independent prognostic factor for relapse after radical prostatectomy
    Deep A Patel
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5847, USA
    J Clin Oncol 23:6157-62. 2005
    ..We evaluated the relative merit of established preoperative factors, including biopsy indices and preoperative PSAV, for their impact on relapse after RP...
  30. ncbi request reprint Genomic profiling reveals alternative genetic pathways of prostate tumorigenesis
    Jacques Lapointe
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Cancer Res 67:8504-10. 2007
    ..The resultant molecular genetic subtypes provide a new framework for investigating prostate cancer biology and explain in part the clinical heterogeneity of the disease...
  31. ncbi request reprint Placental S100 (S100P) and GATA3: markers for transitional epithelium and urothelial carcinoma discovered by complementary DNA microarray
    John P T Higgins
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Am J Surg Pathol 31:673-80. 2007
    ..We conclude that the detection of S100P and GATA3 protein expression may help distinguish urothelial carcinomas from other genitourinary neoplasms that enter into the differential diagnosis...
  32. doi request reprint Prognostic significance of prostate cancer originating from the transition zone
    Christopher R King
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Urologic Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Urol Oncol 27:592-7. 2009
    ..To understand the influence of tumor location, we compared bRFS for TZ and PZ cancers stratified for risk using known clinical and pathological prognostic factors...
  33. pmc Gene expression in the normal adult human kidney assessed by complementary DNA microarray
    John P T Higgins
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Mol Biol Cell 15:649-56. 2004
    ..The distinctive patterns of gene expression in discrete portions of the kidney may serve as a resource for further understanding of renal physiology and the molecular and cellular organization of the nephron...
  34. ncbi request reprint Lower body mass index is associated with a higher prostate cancer detection rate and less favorable pathological features in a biopsy population
    Joseph C Presti
    Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5118, USA
    J Urol 171:2199-202. 2004
    ..We assessed the relationship between BMI, and prostate cancer detection rates and biopsy features in a referral based biopsy population...
  35. ncbi request reprint Analysis of vitamin D-regulated gene expression in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells using cDNA microarrays
    Aruna V Krishnan
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5103, USA
    Prostate 59:243-51. 2004
    ..To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying these actions, we employed cDNA microarrays to study 1,25(OH)2D3-regulated gene expression in the LNCaP human prostate cancer cells...
  36. ncbi request reprint Molecular activity of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in primary cultures of human prostatic epithelial cells revealed by cDNA microarray analysis
    Donna M Peehl
    Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 92:131-41. 2004
    ..The functions of other regulated genes suggest protection by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) from oxidative stress. Overall, these results provide new insights into the molecular basis of antitumor activities of Vitamin D in prostate cells...
  37. doi request reprint Recommendations for the reporting of surgically resected specimens of renal cell carcinoma: the Association of Directors of Anatomic and Surgical Pathology
    John P Higgins
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94025, USA
    Hum Pathol 40:456-63. 2009
    ..The accompanying checklist will serve to ensure that all necessary details of the renal resection specimen are included in the surgical pathology report...
  38. ncbi request reprint Silencing of pi-class glutathione S-transferase in MDA PCa 2a and MDA PCa 2b cells
    Genevieve M Vidanes
    Department of Urology, Stanford University Medical Center, Pasteur Drive, Stanford, California 94305 5118, USA
    Prostate 51:225-30. 2002
    ..Of the available human prostate cancer cell lines, only LNCaP mirrors this phenotype. We investigated whether the prostate cancer cell lines MDA PCa 2a and MDA PCa 2b share this phenotype...
  39. pmc Temporal changes in gene expression induced by sulforaphane in human prostate cancer cells
    Suvarna Bhamre
    Department of Urology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 4305 5118, USA
    Prostate 69:181-90. 2009
    ..To better understand the temporal effects of sulforaphane and broccoli sprouts on gene expression in prostate cells, we carried out comprehensive transcriptome analysis using cDNA microarrays...
  40. ncbi request reprint Prevention of prostate cancer
    S E DePrimo
    Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305-5118, USA
    Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 15:445-57. 2001
    ..This article summarizes the current status and opportunities in prostate cancer prevention...
  41. pmc Differential gene-expression patterns in genital fibroblasts of normal males and 46,XY females with androgen insensitivity syndrome: evidence for early programming involving the androgen receptor
    Paul Martin Holterhus
    Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Genome Biol 4:R37. 2003
    ....
  42. pmc A promoting role of androgen receptor in androgen-sensitive and -insensitive prostate cancer cells
    Tzu Huey Li
    Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5328, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 35:2767-76. 2007
    ..Taken together, our results elucidate an important role for the AR in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells, and suggest that AR can be used as a therapeutic target for androgen-insensitive prostate cancers...
  43. ncbi request reprint Molecular targets of doxazosin in human prostatic stromal cells
    Hongjuan Zhao
    Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5118, USA
    Prostate 62:400-10. 2005
    ..We used cDNA microarray analysis to obtain insights into the mechanisms of action of doxazosin, an alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)...
  44. ncbi request reprint Positive family history of prostate cancer not associated with worse outcomes after radical prostatectomy
    Keith L Lee
    Division of Urologic Oncology, Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5826, USA
    Urology 65:311-5. 2005
    ..To determine the clinical outcomes in men with (FH) and without (NFH) a family history of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy...
  45. ncbi request reprint Endothelin-1 promotes cell survival in renal cell carcinoma through the ET(A) receptor
    Beth R Pflug
    Department of Urology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
    Cancer Lett 246:139-48. 2007
    ..Collectively, these data support the therapeutic targeting of the ET(A) receptor as a novel treatment strategy for RCC...
  46. pmc Gene expression profiling identifies clinically relevant subtypes of prostate cancer
    Jacques Lapointe
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:811-6. 2004
    ..Our results suggest that prostate tumors can be usefully classified according to their gene expression patterns, and these tumor subtypes may provide a basis for improved prognostication and treatment stratification...
  47. ncbi request reprint The retinoic acid synthesis gene ALDH1a2 is a candidate tumor suppressor in prostate cancer
    Hanna Kim
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5176, USA
    Cancer Res 65:8118-24. 2005
    ..Taken together, our findings implicate ALDH1a2 as a candidate tumor suppressor gene in prostate cancer and further support a role of retinoids in the prevention or treatment of prostate cancer...
  48. doi request reprint Recurrent deletion of CHD1 in prostate cancer with relevance to cell invasiveness
    S Huang
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5176, USA
    Oncogene 31:4164-70. 2012
    ..Taken together, our findings suggest that CHD1 deletion may underlie cell invasiveness in a subset of prostate cancers, and indicate a possible novel role of altered chromatin remodeling in prostate tumorigenesis...
  49. ncbi request reprint Role of cytologic criteria in the histologic diagnosis of Gleason grade 1 prostatic adenocarcinoma
    J E McNeal
    Department of Urology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Hum Pathol 32:441-6. 2001
    ..These cytologic findings were proposed to be useful as diagnostic clues, especially in small-needle biopsy samples, in which architecture may be difficult to interpret. HUM PATHOL 32:441-446...
  50. ncbi request reprint A variant TMPRSS2 isoform and ERG fusion product in prostate cancer with implications for molecular diagnosis
    Jacques Lapointe
    Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5176, USA
    Mod Pathol 20:467-73. 2007
    ....
  51. ncbi request reprint Time trends in pathologic features of radical prostatectomy--impact of family history
    Jeffrey B Marotte
    Department of Urology, Division of Urologic Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5826, USA
    Urol Oncol 22:169-73. 2004
    ..8 vs. 7.9; P = 0.01) at the time of diagnosis. We believe these differences are predominantly driven by more aggressive screening in patients with a family history of prostate cancer rather than any true genetic differences...
  52. ncbi request reprint Identification of potential prostate cancer preventive agents through induction of quinone reductase in vitro
    James D Brooks
    Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, USA
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 11:868-75. 2002
    ..Our data suggest that measurement of QR induction in prostate cancer cell lines may help identify potential cancer chemopreventive agents effective in the prostate...
  53. ncbi request reprint Application of genomic technologies to human prostate cancer
    Shijun Li
    Department of Urology, Stanford University of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5118, USA
    OMICS 10:261-75. 2006
    ..Continued improvements in methods of tissue preparation, microarray technology and data analysis will overcome existing challenges and fuel future discoveries...
  54. pmc Selenomethionine induced transcriptional programs in human prostate cancer cells
    Hongjuan Zhao
    Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5118, USA
    J Urol 177:743-50. 2007
    ..We determined the effects of selenomethionine, the major organic selenium containing compound found in the diet and the form of selenium being used in the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial, on prostate cancer cells...
  55. pmc Canary Prostate Active Surveillance Study: design of a multi-institutional active surveillance cohort and biorepository
    Lisa F Newcomb
    Department of Urology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    Urology 75:407-13. 2010
    ..The Canary Prostate Active Surveillance Study is a multicenter study and a biorepository that will discover and confirm biomarkers of aggressive disease as defined by histologic, prostate-specific antigen, or clinical criteria...
  56. ncbi request reprint Plasma selenium level before diagnosis and the risk of prostate cancer development
    J D Brooks
    Department of Urology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California, USA
    J Urol 166:2034-8. 2001
    ..These results support the hypothesis that supplemental selenium may reduce the risk of prostate cancer. Because plasma selenium decreases with patient age, supplementation may be particularly beneficial to older men...
  57. ncbi request reprint Reg IV: a promising marker of hormone refractory metastatic prostate cancer
    Zhennan Gu
    Department of Statistics, Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
    Clin Cancer Res 11:2237-43. 2005
    ..In comparison, it is not expressed by any normal prostate specimens and only at low levels in approximately 40% of primary tumors. These data support Reg IV as a candidate marker for hormone refractory metastatic prostate cancer...
  58. ncbi request reprint Novel pathways associated with bypassing cellular senescence in human prostate epithelial cells
    Steven R Schwarze
    Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Molecular and Environmental Toxicology, Madison, Wisconsin 53972, USA
    J Biol Chem 277:14877-83. 2002
    ..These changes may be critical not only in allowing cells to bypass senescence in vitro but in the progression of prostate cancer in vivo...
  59. pmc A transcriptional profile of aging in the human kidney
    Graham E J Rodwell
    Division of Nephrology, Stanford University Medical Center Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS Biol 2:e427. 2004
    ..Finally, the set of aging-regulated kidney genes suggests specific mechanisms and pathways that may play a role in kidney degeneration with age...
  60. ncbi request reprint Cell-line and tissue-specific signatures of androgen receptor-coregulator transcription
    Jan Hendrik Bebermeier
    Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Campus Lubeck, Lubeck, Germany
    J Mol Med (Berl) 84:919-31. 2006
    ..Therefore, differential expression patterns of AR coregulators could modify tissue-specificity and diversity of androgen actions in development, physiology, and disease...
  61. pmc Gene expression patterns in human embryonic stem cells and human pluripotent germ cell tumors
    Jamie M Sperger
    Wisconsin National Primate Research Center and Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53715, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:13350-5. 2003
    ..These genes are candidates for involvement in the maintenance of a pluripotent, undifferentiated phenotype...