Jay B Brodsky

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Morbid obesity and tracheal intubation
    Jay B Brodsky
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94303, USA
    Anesth Analg 94:732-6; table of contents. 2002
  2. ncbi request reprint The evolution of thoracic anesthesia
    Jay B Brodsky
    Department of Anesthesia, H3580, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Thorac Surg Clin 15:1-10. 2005
  3. ncbi request reprint Anesthesia for thoracic surgery in morbidly obese patients
    Jens Lohser
    Department of Anesthesiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Curr Opin Anaesthesiol 20:10-4. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint What intraoperative monitoring makes sense?
    J B Brodsky
    Department of Anesthesiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA, USA
    Chest 115:101S-105S. 1999
  5. ncbi request reprint Modern anesthetic techniques for thoracic operations
    J B Brodsky
    Department of Anesthesiology, H 3580, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford California 94035, USA
    World J Surg 25:162-6. 2001
  6. ncbi request reprint Positioning the morbidly obese patient for anesthesia
    Jay B Brodsky
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Obes Surg 12:751-8. 2002
  7. ncbi request reprint Bronchoscopic procedures for central airway obstruction
    Jay B Brodsky
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University Medical Center School of Medicine, CA 94305, USA
    J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth 17:638-46. 2003
  8. ncbi request reprint The dose of succinylcholine in morbid obesity
    Harry J M Lemmens
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Anesth Analg 102:438-42. 2006
  9. ncbi request reprint Intra-operative fluid volume influences postoperative nausea and vomiting after laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery
    Rob Schuster
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305, USA
    Obes Surg 16:848-51. 2006
  10. ncbi request reprint General anesthesia, bariatric surgery, and the BIS monitor
    Harry J M Lemmens
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Obes Surg 15:63. 2005

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications46

  1. ncbi request reprint Morbid obesity and tracheal intubation
    Jay B Brodsky
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94303, USA
    Anesth Analg 94:732-6; table of contents. 2002
    ..We conclude that obesity alone is not predictive of tracheal intubation difficulties...
  2. ncbi request reprint The evolution of thoracic anesthesia
    Jay B Brodsky
    Department of Anesthesia, H3580, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Thorac Surg Clin 15:1-10. 2005
    ....
  3. ncbi request reprint Anesthesia for thoracic surgery in morbidly obese patients
    Jens Lohser
    Department of Anesthesiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Curr Opin Anaesthesiol 20:10-4. 2007
    ..Obese patients have altered anatomy and physiology, and usually have associated comorbid medical conditions that may complicate their operative course and increase their risks for postoperative complications...
  4. ncbi request reprint What intraoperative monitoring makes sense?
    J B Brodsky
    Department of Anesthesiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA, USA
    Chest 115:101S-105S. 1999
    ..Monitors are useful adjuncts, but they alone cannot replace careful observation by a vigilant anesthesiologist...
  5. ncbi request reprint Modern anesthetic techniques for thoracic operations
    J B Brodsky
    Department of Anesthesiology, H 3580, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford California 94035, USA
    World J Surg 25:162-6. 2001
    ..This paper reviews modern clinical practices in the field of thoracic anesthesia...
  6. ncbi request reprint Positioning the morbidly obese patient for anesthesia
    Jay B Brodsky
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Obes Surg 12:751-8. 2002
    ..An understanding of the physiologic changes that can occur is essential for the successful management of these patients...
  7. ncbi request reprint Bronchoscopic procedures for central airway obstruction
    Jay B Brodsky
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University Medical Center School of Medicine, CA 94305, USA
    J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth 17:638-46. 2003
  8. ncbi request reprint The dose of succinylcholine in morbid obesity
    Harry J M Lemmens
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Anesth Analg 102:438-42. 2006
    ..Our study demonstrates that for complete neuromuscular paralysis and predictable laryngoscopy conditions, SCH 1 mg/kg total body weight is recommended...
  9. ncbi request reprint Intra-operative fluid volume influences postoperative nausea and vomiting after laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery
    Rob Schuster
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305, USA
    Obes Surg 16:848-51. 2006
    ..A significant number of patients experience postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) following this procedure. The aim of this study was to determine the effect, if any, of intra-operative fluid replacement on PONV...
  10. ncbi request reprint General anesthesia, bariatric surgery, and the BIS monitor
    Harry J M Lemmens
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Obes Surg 15:63. 2005
  11. ncbi request reprint Laryngoscopy and morbid obesity: a comparison of the "sniff" and "ramped" positions
    Jeremy S Collins
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
    Obes Surg 14:1171-5. 2004
    ..The effect of patient position on the view obtained during laryngoscopy was investigated...
  12. doi request reprint Intraoperative fluid replacement and postoperative creatine phosphokinase levels in laparoscopic bariatric patients
    Daniel B Wool
    Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Obes Surg 20:698-701. 2010
    ..The aim of this study was to determine if intraoperative intravenous fluid (IVF) volume affects postoperative CK levels following laparoscopic bariatric operations...
  13. ncbi request reprint Comparison of procedural times for ultrasound-guided perineural catheter insertion in obese and nonobese patients
    Edward R Mariano
    Department of Anesthesia, University of California, San Diego, California, USA
    J Ultrasound Med 30:1357-61. 2011
    ..We therefore tested the hypothesis that obese patients require more time for perineural catheter insertion compared to nonobese patients despite using ultrasound...
  14. doi request reprint Lean body weight scalar for the anesthetic induction dose of propofol in morbidly obese subjects
    Jerry Ingrande
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Dr, Room H3580, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Anesth Analg 113:57-62. 2011
    ..Therefore, we compared different weight-based scalars for dosing propofol for anesthetic induction in MO subjects...
  15. ncbi request reprint Orogastric tube complications in laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
    Barry S Sanchez
    Dept of Surgery, University Medical Center, Stanford School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Obes Surg 16:443-7. 2006
    ..An adverse event in laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGBP) which has not received much scrutiny involves orogastric tube complications during gastric pouch formation...
  16. ncbi request reprint Estimating ideal body weight--a new formula
    Harry J M Lemmens
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Obes Surg 15:1082-3. 2005
    ..The equation IBW = 22 x H2, where H is equal to patient height in meters, yields weight values midway within the range of weights obtained using published IBW formulae...
  17. ncbi request reprint The preoperative anesthesia evaluation
    Clifford A Schmiesing
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, H3524, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Thorac Surg Clin 15:305-15. 2005
    ..Good communication and preparation benefit everyone. The implementation of an anesthesia preoperative assessment program or clinic can help achieve these important goals...
  18. ncbi request reprint Tracheal width and left double-lumen tube size: a formula to estimate left-bronchial width
    Jay B Brodsky
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Clin Anesth 17:267-70. 2005
    ..To determine which patient parameters best predict left bronchial width (LBW) when selecting the correct size double-lumen tube (DLT). If LBW is known, a DLT that will fit that bronchus can be chosen...
  19. ncbi request reprint Bronchial stenting through a ProSeal laryngeal mask airway
    Jens Lohser
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5640, USA
    J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth 20:227-8. 2006
  20. ncbi request reprint Estimating blood volume in obese and morbidly obese patients
    Harry J M Lemmens
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Obes Surg 16:773-6. 2006
    ..Since (In)BV decreases in a non-linear manner with increasing weight, this value cannot be used for obese and morbidly obese patients. We present an equation that allows estimation of (In)BV over the entire range of body weights...
  21. ncbi request reprint Isolation of the right upper-lobe with a left-sided double-lumen tube after left-pneumonectomy
    Kevin J Scholten
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Anesth Analg 105:330-1. 2007
    ..A left double-lumen endobronchial tube was placed in the right bronchus intermedius, isolating the right upper lobe while allowing ventilation of the right middle and lower lobes...
  22. ncbi request reprint The history of anesthesia for thoracic surgery
    J B Brodsky
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Minerva Anestesiol 73:513-24. 2007
    ..This review will identify major events in the history of anesthesia for thoracic surgery...
  23. doi request reprint Lung separation and the difficult airway
    J B Brodsky
    Department of Anesthesia, H 3580, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Br J Anaesth 103:i66-75. 2009
    ..This review considers the different techniques used to achieve lung separation and their application to the patient with a difficult airway...
  24. ncbi request reprint Nitrous oxide and laparoscopic bariatric surgery
    J B Brodsky
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Obes Surg 15:494-6. 2005
    ..One side-effect of N2O is its ability to expand an air-containing space. We investigated if N2O adversely affected operating conditions by distending normal bowel during laparoscopic bariatric procedures...
  25. doi request reprint Regional anesthesia and obesity
    Jerry Ingrande
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Curr Opin Anaesthesiol 22:683-6. 2009
    ..The following is a review of regional anesthesia in obesity, with special consideration of the unique challenges presented to the anesthesiologist by the obese patient...
  26. ncbi request reprint Obesity, surgery, and inhalation anesthetics -- is there a "drug of choice"?
    Jay B Brodsky
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Obes Surg 16:734. 2006
  27. doi request reprint Cardiac arrest during laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in a bariatric patient with drug-associated long QT syndrome
    Gavitt Woodard
    Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, H3680, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Obes Surg 21:134-7. 2011
    ..We discuss identification, prevention, and treatment strategies for LQTS in the bariatric surgery patient...
  28. ncbi request reprint Regional anesthesia and obesity
    Jay B Brodsky
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Obes Surg 17:1146-9. 2007
    ..This review discusses the application of regional anesthetic techniques in obesity. Further clinical studies are needed to fill the knowledge gap about regional anesthesia and outcome in obese and morbidly obese patients...
  29. ncbi request reprint Anesthetic drugs and bariatric surgery
    Hendrikus J M Lemmens
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Anesthesia Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Expert Rev Neurother 6:1107-13. 2006
    ..Future systematic pharmacological research is needed for improved and more rational peri-operative care of morbidly obese patients...
  30. ncbi request reprint Left double-lumen tubes: clinical experience with 1,170 patients
    Jay B Brodsky
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth 17:289-98. 2003
  31. ncbi request reprint Is the super-obese patient different?
    Jay B Brodsky
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Obes Surg 14:1428. 2004
  32. doi request reprint Intraoperative contralateral tension pneumothorax during pneumonectomy
    Gordon N Finlayson
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Anesth Analg 106:58-60, table of contents. 2008
    ..A tension pneumothorax should be considered in any patient who develops high peak inspiratory pressures during one-lung ventilation with an open chest, even in the absence of the classic signs of hypoxemia and hypotension...
  33. ncbi request reprint Regional anaesthesia in the obese patient: lost landmarks and evolving ultrasound guidance
    Jay B Brodsky
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Best Pract Res Clin Anaesthesiol 25:61-72. 2011
    ..Further research is needed to determine optimal regional anaesthesia techniques, local anaesthetic dosage and perioperative outcomes in obese patients...
  34. ncbi request reprint Morbid obesity and the prone position: a case report
    J B Brodsky
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Clin Anesth 13:138-40. 2001
    ..An improperly positioned prone patient can experience serious impairment of cardiopulmonary function. However, with appropriate preparation, even an extremely obese patient can safely tolerate the prone position...
  35. ncbi request reprint Case 5--2005: anesthetic management of major hemorrhage during mediastinoscopy. [clin conf]
    Jens Lohser
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5640, USA
    J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth 19:678-83. 2005
  36. ncbi request reprint Limitations of impedance cardiography
    D P Bernstein
    Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Obes Surg 15:659-60. 2005
  37. ncbi request reprint The relationship between tracheal width and left bronchial width: Implications for left-sided double-lumen tube selection
    J B Brodsky
    Department of Anesthesiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. Jbrodskyleland.stanford.edu
    J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth 15:216-7. 2001
    ..77 +/- 0.10). CONCLUSIONS: LBW is proportional to TW. If LBW cannot be measured directly but TW can, the ratio of LBW to TW can be used to predict LBW. An appropriate-sized left double-lumen tube can then be selected for the patient...
  38. ncbi request reprint Anesthetic considerations for bariatric surgery: proper positioning is important for laryngoscopy
    Jay B Brodsky
    Anesth Analg 96:1841-2; author reply 1842. 2003
  39. ncbi request reprint Anesthetic management of morbidly obese and super-morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric operations: hospital course and outcomes
    Yigal Leykin
    Department of Anesthesia, Pain, Perioperative Medicine and Intensive Care, Santa Maria degli Angeli Hospital, Pordenone, Italy
    Obes Surg 16:1563-9. 2006
    ..9 kg/m(2)). We compared anesthetic and perioperative data of SO patients and MO patients undergoing weight loss operations to evaluate if anesthetic management influenced outcome...
  40. ncbi request reprint Accurate placement of double-lumen tubes: clinical signs are important
    Jay B Brodsky
    J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth 17:781-2. 2003
  41. ncbi request reprint Obesity and difficult intubation: where is the evidence?
    Jeremy S Collins
    Anesthesiology 104:617; author reply 618-9. 2006
  42. doi request reprint Anesthetic considerations for airway stenting in adult patients
    Gordon N Finlayson
    Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1M9, Canada
    Anesthesiol Clin 26:281-91, vi. 2008
    ..Airway stenting provides a therapeutic option to manage these complex lesions. This article focuses on the relevant anesthetic considerations of airway stenting in adult patients...
  43. doi request reprint Undersizing left double-lumen tubes
    Jens Lohser
    Anesth Analg 107:342. 2008
  44. ncbi request reprint Succinylcholine and morbid obesity
    Jay B Brodsky
    Obes Surg 13:138-9. 2003
  45. ncbi request reprint Tracheal perforation from double-lumen tubes: size may be important
    Jens Lohser
    Anesth Analg 101:1243-4; author reply 1244-5. 2005
  46. ncbi request reprint Silbronco double-lumen tube
    Jens Lohser
    J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth 20:129-31. 2006