Edward S Boyden

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Cerebellum-dependent learning: the role of multiple plasticity mechanisms
    Edward S Boyden
    Department of Neurobiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Neurosci 27:581-609. 2004
  2. ncbi request reprint Selective engagement of plasticity mechanisms for motor memory storage
    Edward S Boyden
    Department of Neurobiology, Stanford University, California 94305, USA
    Neuron 51:823-34. 2006
  3. ncbi request reprint Distinct patterns of stimulus generalization of increases and decreases in VOR gain
    Rhea R Kimpo
    Dept of Neurobiology, Stanford University, 299 W Campus Dr, Stanford, CA 94305 5125, USA
    J Neurophysiol 94:3092-100. 2005
  4. ncbi request reprint Active reversal of motor memories reveals rules governing memory encoding
    Edward S Boyden
    Department of Neurobiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuron 39:1031-42. 2003
  5. ncbi request reprint Channelrhodopsin-2 and optical control of excitable cells
    Feng Zhang
    Department of Bioengineering, Clark Center, Stanford University, 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Methods 3:785-92. 2006
  6. pmc Anti-Ca2+ channel antibody attenuates Ca2+ currents and mimics cerebellar ataxia in vivo
    Yaping Joyce Liao
    Departments of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:2705-10. 2008
  7. ncbi request reprint Millisecond-timescale, genetically targeted optical control of neural activity
    Edward S Boyden
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Neurosci 8:1263-8. 2005

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications7

  1. ncbi request reprint Cerebellum-dependent learning: the role of multiple plasticity mechanisms
    Edward S Boyden
    Department of Neurobiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Neurosci 27:581-609. 2004
    ..These principles emerging from studies of the VOR are consistent with results concerning more complex behaviors and thus may reflect general principles of cerebellar function...
  2. ncbi request reprint Selective engagement of plasticity mechanisms for motor memory storage
    Edward S Boyden
    Department of Neurobiology, Stanford University, California 94305, USA
    Neuron 51:823-34. 2006
    ..Thus, a particular plasticity mechanism need not support all cerebellum-dependent memories, but can be engaged selectively according to the parameters of training...
  3. ncbi request reprint Distinct patterns of stimulus generalization of increases and decreases in VOR gain
    Rhea R Kimpo
    Dept of Neurobiology, Stanford University, 299 W Campus Dr, Stanford, CA 94305 5125, USA
    J Neurophysiol 94:3092-100. 2005
    ..At one or more sites, the plasticity mechanisms supporting decreases in VOR gain must be less synapse-specific, or affect neurons more broadly tuned for head rotation frequency, than the mechanisms supporting increases in gain...
  4. ncbi request reprint Active reversal of motor memories reveals rules governing memory encoding
    Edward S Boyden
    Department of Neurobiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuron 39:1031-42. 2003
    ..Contrary to previous models about memory encoding by the cerebellum, our results indicate that these behavioral changes are implemented by different plasticity mechanisms, which reverse each other with unequal efficacy...
  5. ncbi request reprint Channelrhodopsin-2 and optical control of excitable cells
    Feng Zhang
    Department of Bioengineering, Clark Center, Stanford University, 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Methods 3:785-92. 2006
    ..Here we explore technological issues relevant to the temporal precision, spatial targeting and physiological implementation of ChR2, in the context of other photostimulation approaches to optical control of excitable cells...
  6. pmc Anti-Ca2+ channel antibody attenuates Ca2+ currents and mimics cerebellar ataxia in vivo
    Yaping Joyce Liao
    Departments of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:2705-10. 2008
    ..Our data support the hypothesis that anti-VGCC antibody may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of cerebellar dysfunction in PCA...
  7. ncbi request reprint Millisecond-timescale, genetically targeted optical control of neural activity
    Edward S Boyden
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Neurosci 8:1263-8. 2005
    ..This technology allows the use of light to alter neural processing at the level of single spikes and synaptic events, yielding a widely applicable tool for neuroscientists and biomedical engineers...