John C Boothroyd

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Genetic and biochemical analysis of development in Toxoplasma gondii
    J C Boothroyd
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5402, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 352:1347-54. 1997
  2. ncbi request reprint Kiss and spit: the dual roles of Toxoplasma rhoptries
    John C Boothroyd
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5124, USA
    Nat Rev Microbiol 6:79-88. 2008
  3. pmc Toxoplasma gondii: 25 years and 25 major advances for the field
    John C Boothroyd
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5124, USA
    Int J Parasitol 39:935-46. 2009
  4. ncbi request reprint Expansion of host range as a driving force in the evolution of Toxoplasma
    John C Boothroyd
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5124, USA
    Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz 104:179-84. 2009
  5. ncbi request reprint Population biology of Toxoplasma gondii and its relevance to human infection: do different strains cause different disease?
    John C Boothroyd
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Fairchild Science Building, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5124, USA
    Curr Opin Microbiol 5:438-42. 2002
  6. pmc Expression quantitative trait locus mapping of toxoplasma genes reveals multiple mechanisms for strain-specific differences in gene expression
    Jon P Boyle
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Fairchild Building, Room D305, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Eukaryot Cell 7:1403-14. 2008
  7. ncbi request reprint DNA microarrays in parasitology: strengths and limitations
    John C Boothroyd
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Trends Parasitol 19:470-6. 2003
  8. pmc The Toxoplasma gondii dense granule protein GRA7 is phosphorylated upon invasion and forms an unexpected association with the rhoptry proteins ROP2 and ROP4
    Joe Dan Dunn
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5124, USA
    Infect Immun 76:5853-61. 2008
  9. pmc Strain-dependent host transcriptional responses to Toxoplasma infection are largely conserved in mammalian and avian hosts
    Yi Ching Ong
    Stanford University, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e26369. 2011
  10. pmc Polymorphic family of injected pseudokinases is paramount in Toxoplasma virulence
    Michael L Reese
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:9625-30. 2011

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications65

  1. pmc Genetic and biochemical analysis of development in Toxoplasma gondii
    J C Boothroyd
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5402, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 352:1347-54. 1997
    ..Chief among the techniques used for these studies are genetics and molecular genetics. Recent progress in these areas is described...
  2. ncbi request reprint Kiss and spit: the dual roles of Toxoplasma rhoptries
    John C Boothroyd
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5124, USA
    Nat Rev Microbiol 6:79-88. 2008
    ..Here, we discuss these recent findings and use them to propose a model in which an expansion of host range is a major force that drives rhoptry-protein evolution...
  3. pmc Toxoplasma gondii: 25 years and 25 major advances for the field
    John C Boothroyd
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5124, USA
    Int J Parasitol 39:935-46. 2009
    ..Despite this, it is hoped that the reader will agree with, or at least not disagree too strongly with, most of the choices presented here...
  4. ncbi request reprint Expansion of host range as a driving force in the evolution of Toxoplasma
    John C Boothroyd
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5124, USA
    Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz 104:179-84. 2009
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Population biology of Toxoplasma gondii and its relevance to human infection: do different strains cause different disease?
    John C Boothroyd
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Fairchild Science Building, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5124, USA
    Curr Opin Microbiol 5:438-42. 2002
    ..Clear correlations will substantially affect the management of human disease, matching an aggressive infection with an equally aggressive treatment...
  6. pmc Expression quantitative trait locus mapping of toxoplasma genes reveals multiple mechanisms for strain-specific differences in gene expression
    Jon P Boyle
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Fairchild Building, Room D305, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Eukaryot Cell 7:1403-14. 2008
    ....
  7. ncbi request reprint DNA microarrays in parasitology: strengths and limitations
    John C Boothroyd
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Trends Parasitol 19:470-6. 2003
    ..However, many parasitologists work on organisms whose genomes have been only partially sequenced and where little, if any, annotation is available. The focus of this review is on how to use and apply microarrays to these situations...
  8. pmc The Toxoplasma gondii dense granule protein GRA7 is phosphorylated upon invasion and forms an unexpected association with the rhoptry proteins ROP2 and ROP4
    Joe Dan Dunn
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5124, USA
    Infect Immun 76:5853-61. 2008
    ..Independently of its phosphorylation state, GRA7 associates with the rhoptry proteins ROP2 and ROP4 in infected host cells. This is the first report of interactions between proteins secreted from rhoptries and dense granules...
  9. pmc Strain-dependent host transcriptional responses to Toxoplasma infection are largely conserved in mammalian and avian hosts
    Yi Ching Ong
    Stanford University, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e26369. 2011
    ..These results indicate that if different hosts select for different parasite genotypes, the selection operates downstream of the signaling occurring during the beginning of the host's immune response...
  10. pmc Polymorphic family of injected pseudokinases is paramount in Toxoplasma virulence
    Michael L Reese
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:9625-30. 2011
    ..Such a strategy likely contributes to Toxoplasma's successful adaptation to a wide host range and has resulted in dramatic differences in virulence...
  11. pmc A cluster of four surface antigen genes specifically expressed in bradyzoites, SAG2CDXY, plays an important role in Toxoplasma gondii persistence
    Jeroen P J Saeij
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford, CA 94305 5124, USA
    Infect Immun 76:2402-10. 2008
    ....
  12. pmc Bradyzoite-specific surface antigen SRS9 plays a role in maintaining Toxoplasma gondii persistence in the brain and in host control of parasite replication in the intestine
    Seon Kyeong Kim
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Infect Immun 75:1626-34. 2007
    ..Thus, SRS9 appears to play an important role in both persistence in the brain and reactivation in the intestine. Possible mechanisms for this are discussed...
  13. pmc Identification of tissue cyst wall components by transcriptome analysis of in vivo and in vitro Toxoplasma gondii bradyzoites
    Kerry R Buchholz
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5124, USA
    Eukaryot Cell 10:1637-47. 2011
    ..Thus, we report the first analysis of the transcriptomes of in vitro and in vivo bradyzoites and identify two new protein components of the Toxoplasma tissue cyst wall...
  14. pmc A helical membrane-binding domain targets the Toxoplasma ROP2 family to the parasitophorous vacuole
    Michael L Reese
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Fairchild Science Building, Stanford, CA 94305 5124, USA
    Traffic 10:1458-70. 2009
    ..This previously uncharacterized helical domain is an evolutionarily robust and energetically efficient design for membrane association...
  15. pmc Disruption of a locus encoding a nucleolar zinc finger protein decreases tachyzoite-to-bradyzoite differentiation in Toxoplasma gondii
    Padmini Vanchinathan
    Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5124, USA
    Infect Immun 73:6680-8. 2005
    ..This represents the first identification of a gene necessary for efficient conversion of tachyzoites to bradyzoites...
  16. ncbi request reprint Differences among the three major strains of Toxoplasma gondii and their specific interactions with the infected host
    Jeroen P J Saeij
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Fairchild Building D305, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5124, USA
    Trends Parasitol 21:476-81. 2005
    ..Many studies have investigated the ability of T. gondii to manipulate its host but few have examined directly whether the three lineages differ in this ability...
  17. pmc Bradyzoite pseudokinase 1 is crucial for efficient oral infectivity of the Toxoplasma gondii tissue cyst
    Kerry R Buchholz
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Eukaryot Cell 12:399-410. 2013
    ..Together, these data reveal that BPK1 plays a crucial role in the in vivo development and infectivity of Toxoplasma cysts...
  18. ncbi request reprint A GFP-based motif-trap reveals a novel mechanism of targeting for the Toxoplasma ROP4 protein
    Peter J Bradley
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5124, USA
    Mol Biochem Parasitol 137:111-20. 2004
    ..Further analysis of a parasite clone containing GFP targeted to the rhoptries shows GFP fused to the gene encoding the rhoptry protein ROP4 and has elucidated an additional mechanism for targeting of this protein...
  19. ncbi request reprint Toxoplasma gondii: inconsistent dissemination patterns following oral infection in mice
    Jon P Boyle
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Exp Parasitol 116:302-5. 2007
    ..Based on the inconsistency of infections initiated with oral gavage, it is recommended that natural feeding be used to infect mice when a consistent oral infection is desired...
  20. pmc Rapid membrane disruption by a perforin-like protein facilitates parasite exit from host cells
    Bjorn F C Kafsack
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
    Science 323:530-3. 2009
    ..Perforin-like proteins from other intracellular pathogens may play a similar role in microbial egress and virulence...
  21. pmc Use of two novel approaches to discriminate between closely related host microRNAs that are manipulated by Toxoplasma gondii during infection
    Gusti M Zeiner
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    RNA 16:1268-74. 2010
    ..These methods can be used to rapidly and inexpensively discriminate between any closely related miRNAs in any organism...
  22. pmc Bioluminescence imaging of Toxoplasma gondii infection in living mice reveals dramatic differences between strains
    Jeroen P J Saeij
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Fairchild Building D305, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5124, USA
    Infect Immun 73:695-702. 2005
    ..This method has great potential for identifying important differences in the dissemination and growth of different T. gondii strains, especially strains with dramatically different disease outcomes...
  23. pmc Toxoplasma gondii asexual development: identification of developmentally regulated genes and distinct patterns of gene expression
    Michael D Cleary
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5124, USA
    Eukaryot Cell 1:329-40. 2002
    ..This analysis permits the first in-depth look at changes in gene expression during development of this complex protozoan parasite...
  24. ncbi request reprint Toxoplasma gondii dysregulates IFN-gamma-inducible gene expression in human fibroblasts: insights from a genome-wide transcriptional profiling
    Seon Kyeong Kim
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Immunol 178:5154-65. 2007
    ..A differential ability to interfere with the IFN-gamma response may, in part, account for the differences in the pathogenesis seen among Toxoplasma and Neospora parasite strains...
  25. pmc Plasmodium falciparum AMA1 binds a rhoptry neck protein homologous to TgRON4, a component of the moving junction in Toxoplasma gondii
    David L Alexander
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5124, USA
    Eukaryot Cell 5:1169-73. 2006
    ..PfRON4 also originates in the rhoptry necks, suggesting that this unusual collaboration of micronemes and rhoptries is a conserved feature of Apicomplexa...
  26. pmc 4-Bromophenacyl bromide specifically inhibits rhoptry secretion during Toxoplasma invasion
    Sandeep Ravindran
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 4:e8143. 2009
    ..This potent compound, the modified "click-chemistry" forms of it, and the resistant mutants should serve as useful tools to further study the processes of Toxoplasma early invasion, in general, and rhoptry secretion, in particular...
  27. ncbi request reprint Analysis of gene expression during development: lessons from the Apicomplexa
    Jon P Boyle
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Fairchild Building D305, Stanford University School of Medicine, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5124, USA
    Microbes Infect 8:1623-30. 2006
    ....
  28. pmc Focus on the ringleader: the role of AMA1 in apicomplexan invasion and replication
    Jessica S Tyler
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305, USA
    Trends Parasitol 27:410-20. 2011
    ..This review discusses these and other recent insights into AMA1 with particular emphasis on studies conducted in Plasmodium and Toxoplasma...
  29. pmc A highly sensitive FRET-based approach reveals secretion of the actin-binding protein toxofilin during Toxoplasma gondii infection
    Melissa B Lodoen
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305, USA
    Cell Microbiol 12:55-66. 2010
    ....
  30. ncbi request reprint Stage-specific expression of surface antigens by Toxoplasma gondii as a mechanism to facilitate parasite persistence
    Seon Kyeong Kim
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Immunol 174:8038-48. 2005
    ..We conclude that stage-specific expression of SRS Ags is among the key mechanisms by which optimal parasite persistency is established and maintained...
  31. pmc The phosphoproteomes of Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii reveal unusual adaptations within and beyond the parasites' boundaries
    Moritz Treeck
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Cell Host Microbe 10:410-9. 2011
    ..This data set provides important information on the role of phosphorylation in the host-pathogen interaction and clues to the evolutionary forces operating on protein phosphorylation motifs in both parasites...
  32. pmc A pseudouridine synthase homologue is critical to cellular differentiation in Toxoplasma gondii
    Matthew Z Anderson
    Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5120, USA
    Eukaryot Cell 8:398-409. 2009
    ..Our results suggest a surprising and important role for RNA modification in this biological process...
  33. ncbi request reprint Identification and disruption of a rhoptry-localized homologue of sodium hydrogen exchangers in Toxoplasma gondii
    Ariela O Karasov
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Int J Parasitol 35:285-91. 2005
    ..TgNHE2 is the first intracellular NHE to be characterized in a protozoan parasite and its localization suggests possible roles for the rhoptries in osmotolerance and/or as secretory lysosomes-like granules...
  34. pmc Chemical genetic screen identifies Toxoplasma DJ-1 as a regulator of parasite secretion, attachment, and invasion
    Carolyn I Hall
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:10568-73. 2011
    ..Together, our results suggest that TgDJ-1 plays an important role that is likely downstream of the calcium flux required for microneme secretion, parasite motility, and subsequent invasion of host cells...
  35. pmc Identification of the moving junction complex of Toxoplasma gondii: a collaboration between distinct secretory organelles
    David L Alexander
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS Pathog 1:e17. 2005
    ..Differences between the contributing proteins in different species may, in part, be the result of selective pressure from the different niches occupied by these parasites...
  36. ncbi request reprint Proteomic analysis of rhoptry organelles reveals many novel constituents for host-parasite interactions in Toxoplasma gondii
    Peter J Bradley
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Biol Chem 280:34245-58. 2005
    ....
  37. pmc A conserved non-canonical motif in the pseudoactive site of the ROP5 pseudokinase domain mediates its effect on Toxoplasma virulence
    Michael L Reese
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5124, USA
    J Biol Chem 286:29366-75. 2011
    ..This suggests that the pseudoactive site of this class of pseudokinases may have evolved to use the canonical ATP-binding motifs for non-catalytic signaling through allostery...
  38. pmc Toxoplasma secreting Cre recombinase for analysis of host-parasite interactions
    Anita A Koshy
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Nat Methods 7:307-9. 2010
    ..In a Cre-reporter cell line, a single parasite invasion induced Cre-mediated recombination in 95% of infected host cells. By infecting Cre-reporter mice with these parasites, we also monitored host-cell infection in vivo...
  39. pmc Toxoplasma rhoptry protein 16 (ROP16) subverts host function by direct tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT6
    Yi Ching Ong
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Biol Chem 285:28731-40. 2010
    ..Furthermore, ROP16 co-immunoprecipitates with STAT6 from infected cells. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that STAT6 is a direct substrate for ROP16 in vivo...
  40. pmc Association of host mitochondria with the parasitophorous vacuole during Toxoplasma infection is not dependent on rhoptry proteins ROP2/8
    Lena Pernas
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5124, USA
    Int J Parasitol 40:1367-71. 2010
    ..We show that this knockout mutant retains the ability to recruit host mitochondria in a manner that is indistinguishable from the parental strain, re-opening the question of which molecules mediate this association...
  41. pmc The C-terminus of Toxoplasma RON2 provides the crucial link between AMA1 and the host-associated invasion complex
    Jessica S Tyler
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS Pathog 7:e1001282. 2011
    ..Hence, the entire C-terminal region of TgRON2 forms the crucial bridge between TgAMA1 and the rest of the MJ complex but this association is not required for rhoptry protein injection...
  42. ncbi request reprint Structure of the immunodominant surface antigen from the Toxoplasma gondii SRS superfamily
    Xiao lin He
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Cailfornia 94305 5124, USA
    Nat Struct Biol 9:606-11. 2002
    ....
  43. pmc Toxoplasma gondii infection specifically increases the levels of key host microRNAs
    Gusti M Zeiner
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 5:e8742. 2010
    ..Here we have investigated whether Toxoplasma modulates the levels of host microRNAs (miRNAs) during infection...
  44. doi request reprint RNA analysis by biosynthetic tagging using 4-thiouracil and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase
    Gusti M Zeiner
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 419:135-46. 2008
    ..This chapter updates the original RABT protocol (1) and addresses methodological details associated with RABT that were beyond the scope or space allotment of the initial report...
  45. ncbi request reprint A novel rhoptry protein in Toxoplasma gondii bradyzoites and merozoites
    Jodi A Schwarz
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Biochem Parasitol 144:159-66. 2005
    ..Since we also observed that BRP1 is expressed in the merozoite stages in the gut of infected cats, the coccidian phase of the life cycle may be where BRP1 plays its most important role...
  46. pmc Just one cross appears capable of dramatically altering the population biology of a eukaryotic pathogen like Toxoplasma gondii
    Jon P Boyle
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:10514-9. 2006
    ..The simplicity of this family tree demonstrates that even a single cross can lead to the emergence and dominance of a new clonal genotype that completely alters the population biology of a sexual pathogen...
  47. ncbi request reprint Genetic analysis of tachyzoite to bradyzoite differentiation mutants in Toxoplasma gondii reveals a hierarchy of gene induction
    Upinder Singh
    D305 Fairchild Building, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5124, USA
    Mol Microbiol 44:721-33. 2002
    ..gondii. Our approach shows the utility of this system as a model to study developmental biology in single-celled eukaryotes including protozoa and fungi...
  48. pmc Behavioral changes induced by Toxoplasma infection of rodents are highly specific to aversion of cat odors
    Ajai Vyas
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:6442-7. 2007
    ..Proximate mechanisms of such behavioral manipulations remain unknown, although a subtle tropism on part of the parasite remains a potent possibility...
  49. pmc Toxoplasma co-opts host cells it does not invade
    Anita A Koshy
    Department of Medicine Infectious Disease, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS Pathog 8:e1002825. 2012
    ..This phenomenon has important implications for how Toxoplasma globally affects its host and opens a new avenue for how other intracellular microbes may similarly manipulate the host environment at large...
  50. doi request reprint Secretion of proteins into host cells by Apicomplexan parasites
    Sandeep Ravindran
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5124, USA
    Traffic 9:647-56. 2008
    ..We also present what is known about the mechanisms by which parasite proteins are exported into the host cell, as well as information on their known and putative functions once they have reached their final destination...
  51. pmc Evidence for host cells as the major contributor of lipids in the intravacuolar network of Toxoplasma-infected cells
    Carolina E Caffaro
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5124, USA
    Eukaryot Cell 10:1095-9. 2011
    ..The results presented here suggest a new model for development of the parasitophorous vacuole whereby the host provides a continuous stream of lipids to support the growth and maturation of the PVM and IVN...
  52. pmc Ionophore-resistant mutant of Toxoplasma gondii reveals involvement of a sodium/hydrogen exchanger in calcium regulation
    Gustavo Arrizabalaga
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Fairchild Building D305, 300 Pasteur Dr, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5124, USA
    J Cell Biol 165:653-62. 2004
    ..These results provide direct genetic evidence of a role for NHE1 in Ca2+ homeostasis and important insight into how this ubiquitous pathogen senses and responds to changes in its environment...
  53. ncbi request reprint Serotyping of Toxoplasma gondii infections in humans using synthetic peptides
    Jiang Ti Kong
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Infect Dis 187:1484-95. 2003
    ..This method should allow statistically significant data to be obtained about whether different strain types cause disease with different characteristics...
  54. pmc A nucleotide sugar transporter involved in glycosylation of the Toxoplasma tissue cyst wall is required for efficient persistence of bradyzoites
    Carolina E Caffaro
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS Pathog 9:e1003331. 2013
    ..These results demonstrate for the first time the critical role of parasite glycoconjugates in the persistence of Toxoplasma tissue cysts...
  55. pmc Toxoplasma gondii Sporozoites Invade Host Cells Using Two Novel Paralogues of RON2 and AMA1
    Anna Poukchanski
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e70637. 2013
    ..These data indicate that sporozoites and tachyzoites each use a distinct pair of paralogous AMA1 and RON2 proteins for invasion into host cells, possibly due to the very different environment in which they each must function. ..
  56. ncbi request reprint Unprocessed Toxoplasma ROP1 is effectively targeted and secreted into the nascent parasitophorous vacuole
    Peter J Bradley
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5124, USA
    Mol Biochem Parasitol 125:189-93. 2002
  57. ncbi request reprint Role of calcium during Toxoplasma gondii invasion and egress
    Gustavo Arrizabalaga
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Fairchild Building, Room D305, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5124, USA
    Int J Parasitol 34:361-8. 2004
    ..In addition, ethanol, a powerful inducer of invasion-related events, is shown here to also induce rapid egress from the host cell, indicating that a common mechanism for calcium release might be involved during both invasion and egress...
  58. pmc Toxoplasma gondii targets a protein phosphatase 2C to the nuclei of infected host cells
    Luke A Gilbert
    Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 1489, USA
    Eukaryot Cell 6:73-83. 2007
    ..The delivery of parasite effector proteins via the rhoptries provides a novel mechanism for Toxoplasma to directly access the command center of its host cell during infection by the parasite...
  59. ncbi request reprint Biosynthetic labeling of RNA with uracil phosphoribosyltransferase allows cell-specific microarray analysis of mRNA synthesis and decay
    Michael D Cleary
    Nat Biotechnol 23:232-7. 2005
    ..gondii UPRT, indicating that engineered UPRT expression will allow cell-specific analysis of gene expression in organisms other than T. gondii...
  60. ncbi request reprint The induction of acute ileitis by a single microbial antigen of Toxoplasma gondii
    Nicolas Rachinel
    Department of Medicine, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, NH 03756, USA
    J Immunol 173:2725-35. 2004
    ..This process was associated with a shift toward a Th1 response. These findings demonstrate that a single Ag (SAG1) of T. gondii can elicit a lethal inflammatory process in this experimental model of pathogen-driven ileitis...
  61. ncbi request reprint Toxoplasma gondii sequesters lysosomes from mammalian hosts in the vacuolar space
    Isabelle Coppens
    Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Cell 125:261-74. 2006
    ..More generally, they identify a unique mechanism for unidirectional transport and sequestration of host organelles...
  62. ncbi request reprint The BSR4 protein is up-regulated in Toxoplasma gondii bradyzoites, however the dominant surface antigen recognised by the P36 monoclonal antibody is SRS9
    Tam T Van
    Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    Int J Parasitol 37:877-85. 2007
    ..Immunoprecipitation experiments confirm that the P36 mAb interacts with the SRS9 protein. These data indicate that while the BSR4 protein is up-regulated in bradyzoites, the dominant antigen that the P36 mAb recognises is SRS9...
  63. ncbi request reprint Immediate/early response to Trypanosoma cruzi infection involves minimal modulation of host cell transcription
    Silvia Vaena De Avalos
    Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    J Biol Chem 277:639-44. 2002
    ..As compared with global transcriptional responses evoked by other intracellular pathogens, T. cruzi is a stealth parasite that elicits few changes in host cell transcription during the initiation of infection...
  64. ncbi request reprint Pulling together: an integrated model of Toxoplasma cell invasion
    Vern Carruthers
    W Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 1918, USA
    Curr Opin Microbiol 10:83-9. 2007
    ..These recent findings have led to new hypotheses regarding the parasite's broad host-specificity...
  65. pmc Composite genome map and recombination parameters derived from three archetypal lineages of Toxoplasma gondii
    Asis Khan
    Department of Molecular Microbiology, Center for Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 33:2980-92. 2005
    ..The resulting genome map provides a framework for analysis of complex traits such as virulence and transmission, and for comparative population genetic studies...