B A Block

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Microarray gene expression profiles from mature gonad tissues of Atlantic bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus in the Gulf of Mexico
    Luke D Gardner
    Biology Department, Hopkins Marine Station, Pacific Grove, Stanford University, California 93950, USA
    BMC Genomics 13:530. 2012
  2. ncbi request reprint Electronic tagging and population structure of Atlantic bluefin tuna
    Barbara A Block
    Tuna Research and Conservation Center, Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, Pacific Grove, California 93950, USA
    Nature 434:1121-7. 2005
  3. ncbi request reprint Migratory movements, depth preferences, and thermal biology of Atlantic bluefin tuna
    B A Block
    Tuna Research and Conservation Center, Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, Oceanview Boulevard, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    Science 293:1310-4. 2001
  4. doi request reprint Tracking apex marine predator movements in a dynamic ocean
    B A Block
    Stanford University, Biology Department, Hopkins Marine Station, Pacific Grove, California 93950, USA
    Nature 475:86-90. 2011
  5. ncbi request reprint Satellite tagging and cardiac physiology reveal niche expansion in salmon sharks
    Kevin C Weng
    Tuna Research and Conservation Center, Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, 120 Oceanview Boulevard, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    Science 310:104-6. 2005
  6. ncbi request reprint Temperature dependence of the Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2) in the ventricles of tuna and mackerel
    Ana M Landeira-Fernandez
    Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford Univ, Oceanview Blvd, Pacific Grove, CA, 93950, USA
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 286:R398-404. 2004
  7. doi request reprint Postprandial metabolism of Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis)
    T D Clark
    Tuna Research and Conservation Center, Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station Monterey Bay Aquarium, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    J Exp Biol 213:2379-85. 2010
  8. doi request reprint Heart rate responses to temperature in free-swimming Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis)
    T D Clark
    Tuna Research and Conservation Center, Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station Monterey Bay Aquarium, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    J Exp Biol 216:3208-14. 2013
  9. ncbi request reprint Oxygen affinity and amino acid sequence of myoglobins from endothermic and ectothermic fish
    D J Marcinek
    Tuna Research and Conservation Center and Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 280:R1123-33. 2001
  10. ncbi request reprint Characterization of RyR1-slow, a ryanodine receptor specific to slow-twitch skeletal muscle
    J Morrissette
    Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, California 93950, USA
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 279:R1889-98. 2000

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications28

  1. pmc Microarray gene expression profiles from mature gonad tissues of Atlantic bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus in the Gulf of Mexico
    Luke D Gardner
    Biology Department, Hopkins Marine Station, Pacific Grove, Stanford University, California 93950, USA
    BMC Genomics 13:530. 2012
    ..The aim of this investigation was to compare transcription profiles from the ovaries and testes of mature T. thynnus to establish sex specific variations underlying their reproductive physiology...
  2. ncbi request reprint Electronic tagging and population structure of Atlantic bluefin tuna
    Barbara A Block
    Tuna Research and Conservation Center, Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, Pacific Grove, California 93950, USA
    Nature 434:1121-7. 2005
    ..Restrictions on the time and area where longlining occurs would reduce incidental catch mortalities on western spawning grounds...
  3. ncbi request reprint Migratory movements, depth preferences, and thermal biology of Atlantic bluefin tuna
    B A Block
    Tuna Research and Conservation Center, Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, Oceanview Boulevard, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    Science 293:1310-4. 2001
    ..These data are critical for the future management and conservation of bluefin tuna in the Atlantic...
  4. doi request reprint Tracking apex marine predator movements in a dynamic ocean
    B A Block
    Stanford University, Biology Department, Hopkins Marine Station, Pacific Grove, California 93950, USA
    Nature 475:86-90. 2011
    ..We identify critical habitats across multinational boundaries and show that top predators exploit their environment in predictable ways, providing the foundation for spatial management of large marine ecosystems...
  5. ncbi request reprint Satellite tagging and cardiac physiology reveal niche expansion in salmon sharks
    Kevin C Weng
    Tuna Research and Conservation Center, Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, 120 Oceanview Boulevard, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    Science 310:104-6. 2005
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint Temperature dependence of the Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2) in the ventricles of tuna and mackerel
    Ana M Landeira-Fernandez
    Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford Univ, Oceanview Blvd, Pacific Grove, CA, 93950, USA
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 286:R398-404. 2004
    ..We also suggest that high levels of SERCA2 in bluefin tuna hearts may be important for retaining cardiac function at cold temperatures...
  7. doi request reprint Postprandial metabolism of Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis)
    T D Clark
    Tuna Research and Conservation Center, Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station Monterey Bay Aquarium, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    J Exp Biol 213:2379-85. 2010
    ..Despite efficient food conversion, SDA is likely to represent a significant component of the daily energy budget of wild bluefin tunas due to a regular and high ingestion of forage...
  8. doi request reprint Heart rate responses to temperature in free-swimming Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis)
    T D Clark
    Tuna Research and Conservation Center, Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station Monterey Bay Aquarium, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    J Exp Biol 216:3208-14. 2013
    ..3. A discussion of the relationships between fH, and haemoglobin-oxygen binding sheds further light on how bluefin cardiorespiratory systems function in a changing thermal environment. ..
  9. ncbi request reprint Oxygen affinity and amino acid sequence of myoglobins from endothermic and ectothermic fish
    D J Marcinek
    Tuna Research and Conservation Center and Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 280:R1123-33. 2001
    ..Correlated with the low oxygen affinity and fast dissociation kinetics of mackerel Mb is a substitution of alanine for proline that would likely result in a more flexible mackerel protein...
  10. ncbi request reprint Characterization of RyR1-slow, a ryanodine receptor specific to slow-twitch skeletal muscle
    J Morrissette
    Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, California 93950, USA
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 279:R1889-98. 2000
    ..These results indicate differences in the physiological properties of RyRs in fish slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscle, which may contribute to differences in the way intracellular Ca(2+) is regulated in these muscle types...
  11. ncbi request reprint Characterization of ryanodine receptor and Ca2+-ATPase isoforms in the thermogenic heater organ of blue marlin (Makaira nigricans)
    Jeffery M Morrissette
    Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    J Exp Biol 206:805-12. 2003
    ....
  12. ncbi request reprint Expanded niche for white sharks
    Andre M Boustany
    Tuna Research and Conservation Center, Stanford University and Monterey Bay Aquarium, Hopkins Marine Station, Pacific Grove, California 93950, USA
    Nature 415:35-6. 2002
    ..Here we report the tracking of movements of white sharks by using pop-up satellite archival tags, which reveal that their migratory movements, depth and ambient thermal ranges are wider than was previously thought...
  13. pmc Philopatry and migration of Pacific white sharks
    Salvador J Jorgensen
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 277:679-88. 2010
    ..This population's fidelity to discrete and predictable locations offers clear population assessment, monitoring and management options...
  14. ncbi request reprint Elevated Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA2) activity in tuna hearts: comparative aspects of temperature dependence
    Pedro C Castilho
    Tuna Research and Conservation Center, Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, California 93950, USA
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 148:124-32. 2007
    ..We propose that the expression of EC coupling proteins in cardiac myocytes, and the higher rates of SERCA2 activity are an important evolutionary step for the maintenance of higher heart rates and endothermy in bluefin tuna...
  15. doi request reprint Multilocus phylogenetic analyses reveal that habitat selection drives the speciation of Didymozoidae (Digenea) parasitizing Pacific and Atlantic bluefin tunas
    I Mladineo
    Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, 120 Oceanview Blvd, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    Parasitology 137:1013-25. 2010
    ..For 2 didymozoid species (D. wedli and D. palati), cox1 sequences indicate intraspecific differences between Mexican and Adriatic populations...
  16. ncbi request reprint Histochemical and immunohistochemical studies on the origin of the blue marlin heater cell phenotype
    A Tullis
    Biology Department, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA 98416, USA
    Tissue Cell 29:627-42. 1997
    ..This conclusion is discussed in the context of the muscle-to-heater trajectory and the muscle fiber-type origin of heater cells...
  17. ncbi request reprint Temperature effects on metabolic rate of juvenile Pacific bluefin tuna Thunnus orientalis
    Jason M Blank
    Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    J Exp Biol 210:4254-61. 2007
    ....
  18. pmc Persistent leatherback turtle migrations present opportunities for conservation
    George L Shillinger
    Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, California, USA
    PLoS Biol 6:e171. 2008
    ..We identify high seas locations for focusing future conservation efforts within the leatherback dispersal zone in the South Pacific Gyre...
  19. ncbi request reprint Effects of temperature, epinephrine and Ca(2+) on the hearts of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares)
    Jason M Blank
    Tuna Research and Conservation Center, Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, Oceanview Boulevard, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    J Exp Biol 205:1881-8. 2002
    ....
  20. pmc Seasonal movements, aggregations and diving behavior of Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) revealed with archival tags
    Andreas Walli
    Tuna Research and Conservation Center, Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, Pacific Grove, CA, USA
    PLoS ONE 4:e6151. 2009
    ..The high concentrations of bluefin tuna in predictable locations indicate that Atlantic bluefin tuna are vulnerable to concentrated fishing efforts in the regions of foraging aggregations...
  21. ncbi request reprint In situ cardiac performance of Pacific bluefin tuna hearts in response to acute temperature change
    Jason M Blank
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Oceanview Boulevard, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    J Exp Biol 207:881-90. 2004
    ..In situ data from Pacific bluefin are compared to in situ measurements of cardiac performance in yellowfin tuna and preliminary results from albacore tuna...
  22. doi request reprint Effect of thermal acclimation on action potentials and sarcolemmal K+ channels from Pacific bluefin tuna cardiomyocytes
    G L J Galli
    Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, USA
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 297:R502-9. 2009
    ..Our results indicate the bluefin AP is relatively short compared with other teleosts, which may allow the bluefin heart to function at cold temperatures without the necessity for thermal compensation of APD...
  23. ncbi request reprint Influence of swimming speed on metabolic rates of juvenile pacific bluefin tuna and yellowfin tuna
    Jason M Blank
    Tuna Research and Conservation Center, Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, California 93950, USA
    Physiol Biochem Zool 80:167-77. 2007
    ..These physiological traits may underlie thermal-niche expansion of bluefin tuna relative to tropical tuna species...
  24. ncbi request reprint Electrophysiological properties of the L-type Ca(2+) current in cardiomyocytes from bluefin tuna and Pacific mackerel
    H A Shiels
    Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 286:R659-68. 2004
    ..Similarly, I(Ca) is enhanced in the ventricle of both species compared with other teleosts and may play a role in the robust cardiac performance of fishes of the family Scombridae...
  25. ncbi request reprint Intramuscular anesthesia of bonito and Pacific mackerel with ketamine and medetomidine and reversal of anesthesia with atipamezole
    Thomas D Williams
    Tuna Research and Conservation Center, Monterey Bay Aquarium, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, CA 93940, USA
    J Am Vet Med Assoc 225:417-21. 2004
    ..To determine anesthetic effects of ketamine and medetomidine in bonitos and mackerels and whether anesthesia could be reversed with atipamezole...
  26. doi request reprint Expression of cytokines IL-1beta and TNF-alpha in tissues and cysts surrounding Didymocystis wedli (Digenea, Didymozoidae) in the Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis)
    Ivona Mladineo
    Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, 120 Oceanview Blvd, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    Fish Shellfish Immunol 29:487-93. 2010
    ..However, the lack of intensive cytokines response to D. wedli observed by molecular and histological data that fails to eliminate the parasite, could be related to the "old" age of the parasitic process...
  27. doi request reprint Heterologous hybridization to a complementary DNA microarray reveals the effect of thermal acclimation in the endothermic bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis)
    Pedro C Castilho
    Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    Mol Ecol 18:2092-102. 2009
    ..The genes whose expression levels were responsive to thermal acclimation varied according to muscle fibre type, perhaps reflecting the tissue-specific degrees of endothermy characteristic of this species...
  28. pmc Migratory shearwaters integrate oceanic resources across the Pacific Ocean in an endless summer
    Scott A Shaffer
    Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:12799-802. 2006
    ..Sooty shearwater populations today are declining, and because they operate on a global scale, they may serve as an important indicator of climate change and ocean health...