Devaki Bhaya

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Analysis of the hli gene family in marine and freshwater cyanobacteria
    Devaki Bhaya
    Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    FEMS Microbiol Lett 215:209-19. 2002
  2. pmc The role of an alternative sigma factor in motility and pilus formation in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803
    D Bhaya
    Carnegie Institution of Washington, Department of Plant Biology, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 96:3188-93. 1999
  3. ncbi request reprint Type IV pilus biogenesis and motility in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803
    D Bhaya
    The Carnegie Institution of Washington, Department of Plant Biology, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Microbiol 37:941-51. 2000
  4. pmc Isolation of regulated genes of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 by differential display
    D Bhaya
    Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Bacteriol 182:5692-9. 2000
  5. pmc Light regulation of type IV pilus-dependent motility by chemosensor-like elements in Synechocystis PCC6803
    D Bhaya
    Department of Plant Biology, The Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98:7540-5. 2001
  6. pmc Novel motility mutants of synechocystis strain PCC 6803 generated by in vitro transposon mutagenesis
    D Bhaya
    Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Bacteriol 183:6140-3. 2001
  7. doi request reprint Regulation of nif gene expression and the energetics of N2 fixation over the diel cycle in a hot spring microbial mat
    Anne Soisig Steunou
    Department of Plant Biology, The Carnegie Institution, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    ISME J 2:364-78. 2008
  8. pmc Phosphorus deprivation responses and phosphonate utilization in a thermophilic Synechococcus sp. from microbial mats
    Melissa M Adams
    Carnegie Institution for Science, Department of Plant Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Bacteriol 190:8171-84. 2008
  9. ncbi request reprint Population level functional diversity in a microbial community revealed by comparative genomic and metagenomic analyses
    Devaki Bhaya
    Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    ISME J 1:703-13. 2007
  10. pmc Responses of a thermophilic Synechococcus isolate from the microbial mat of Octopus Spring to light
    Oliver Kilian
    Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 73:4268-78. 2007

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications23

  1. ncbi request reprint Analysis of the hli gene family in marine and freshwater cyanobacteria
    Devaki Bhaya
    Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    FEMS Microbiol Lett 215:209-19. 2002
    ..This information is discussed with respect to the role of hli genes in the acclimation of cyanobacteria to high light, and the possible relationships among members of this diverse gene family...
  2. pmc The role of an alternative sigma factor in motility and pilus formation in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803
    D Bhaya
    Carnegie Institution of Washington, Department of Plant Biology, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 96:3188-93. 1999
    ....
  3. ncbi request reprint Type IV pilus biogenesis and motility in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803
    D Bhaya
    The Carnegie Institution of Washington, Department of Plant Biology, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Microbiol 37:941-51. 2000
    ..In contrast, pilT2 mutants are motile, but are negatively phototactic under conditions in which wild-type cells are positively phototactic...
  4. pmc Isolation of regulated genes of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 by differential display
    D Bhaya
    Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Bacteriol 182:5692-9. 2000
    ..strain PCC 6803 exceeds its capacity to assimilate phosphate, which, in turn, may trigger a phosphate starvation response and activation of the pho regulon...
  5. pmc Light regulation of type IV pilus-dependent motility by chemosensor-like elements in Synechocystis PCC6803
    D Bhaya
    Department of Plant Biology, The Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98:7540-5. 2001
    ..Mutants in the Tax3 locus are nonmotile and do not make type IV pili. These findings establish links between chemotaxis-like regulatory elements and type IV pilus-mediated phototaxis...
  6. pmc Novel motility mutants of synechocystis strain PCC 6803 generated by in vitro transposon mutagenesis
    D Bhaya
    Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Bacteriol 183:6140-3. 2001
    ..These novel genes and their possible roles in motility are discussed...
  7. doi request reprint Regulation of nif gene expression and the energetics of N2 fixation over the diel cycle in a hot spring microbial mat
    Anne Soisig Steunou
    Department of Plant Biology, The Carnegie Institution, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    ISME J 2:364-78. 2008
    ..These results are discussed with respect to the energetics and regulation of N2 fixation in hot spring mats and factors that can markedly influence the extent of N2 fixation over the diel cycle...
  8. pmc Phosphorus deprivation responses and phosphonate utilization in a thermophilic Synechococcus sp. from microbial mats
    Melissa M Adams
    Carnegie Institution for Science, Department of Plant Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Bacteriol 190:8171-84. 2008
    ..Once acclimated, the cells grew rapidly in fresh medium with methylphosphonate as the only source of phosphorus. The possible implications of these results are discussed with respect to the ecophysiology of the microbial mats...
  9. ncbi request reprint Population level functional diversity in a microbial community revealed by comparative genomic and metagenomic analyses
    Devaki Bhaya
    Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    ISME J 1:703-13. 2007
    ....
  10. pmc Responses of a thermophilic Synechococcus isolate from the microbial mat of Octopus Spring to light
    Oliver Kilian
    Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 73:4268-78. 2007
    ..The results are discussed in the context of how Synechococcus OS-B' may cope with high light irradiances in the high-temperature environment of the microbial mat...
  11. doi request reprint A novel two domain-fusion protein in cyanobacteria with similarity to the CAB/ELIP/HLIP superfamily: evolutionary implications and regulation
    Oliver Kilian
    Department of Plant Biology, The Carnegie Institution, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Plant 1:155-66. 2008
    ..This additional TMH is very similar to a conserved hypothetical, single membrane-spanning polypeptide present in most cyanobacteria. The evolutionary significance of these results is discussed...
  12. pmc Alternative pathways for phosphonate metabolism in thermophilic cyanobacteria from microbial mats
    María R Gómez-García
    Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    ISME J 5:141-9. 2011
    ....
  13. doi request reprint Whole gene amplification and protein separation from a few cells
    Bor han Chueh
    Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Anal Biochem 411:64-70. 2011
    ..This technology opens avenues for studying protein profiles of precious environmental microbial samples and simultaneously accessing genomic information based on WGA...
  14. ncbi request reprint Light matters: phototaxis and signal transduction in unicellular cyanobacteria
    Devaki Bhaya
    Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Microbiol 53:745-54. 2004
    ..Furthermore, the discovery that cyclic AMP and novel gene products are necessary for phototaxis/motility suggests that there might be additional levels of communication and signal processing...
  15. doi request reprint Tracking phototactic responses and modeling motility of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803
    Matthew Burriesci
    Department of Plant Biology, The Carnegie Institution, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, United States
    J Photochem Photobiol B 91:77-86. 2008
    ..In this model, we can simulate the formation of finger-like projections that are characteristic of phototaxis...
  16. pmc Role of polyphosphate in thermophilic Synechococcus sp. from microbial mats
    María R Gómez-García
    Carnegie Institution for Science, Department of Plant Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    J Bacteriol 195:3309-19. 2013
    ..We hypothesize that the opposing activities of these two enzymes allow cells to store and utilize poly P to optimize growth over a diel cycle. ..
  17. doi request reprint CRISPR-Cas systems in bacteria and archaea: versatile small RNAs for adaptive defense and regulation
    Devaki Bhaya
    Carnegie Institution for Science, Department of Plant Biology, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Annu Rev Genet 45:273-97. 2011
    ..Exciting breakthroughs in understanding the mechanisms of the CRISPR-Cas system and its potential for biotechnological applications and understanding evolutionary dynamics are discussed...
  18. pmc Phototaxis and impaired motility in adenylyl cyclase and cyclase receptor protein mutants of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803
    Devaki Bhaya
    Carnegie Institution, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Bacteriol 188:7306-10. 2006
    ..We find that contrary to earlier reports, cya1 and sycrp1 mutants are motile and phototactic but are impaired in one particular phase of phototaxis in comparison with wild-type Synechocystis sp...
  19. pmc In situ analysis of nitrogen fixation and metabolic switching in unicellular thermophilic cyanobacteria inhabiting hot spring microbial mats
    Anne Soisig Steunou
    Department of Plant Biology, The Carnegie Institution, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:2398-403. 2006
    ..In a broader context, our data suggest that there are critical regulatory switches in situ that are linked to the diel cycle and that these switches alter many metabolic processes within the microbial mat...
  20. ncbi request reprint Counting low-copy number proteins in a single cell
    Bo Huang
    Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5080, USA
    Science 315:81-4. 2007
    ..PCC 7942) and observed marked differences in the levels of specific complexes in cell populations that were grown under nitrogen-depleted conditions...
  21. pmc Multiple light inputs control phototaxis in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803
    Wing On Ng
    Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Bacteriol 185:1599-607. 2003
    ..These results suggest that while positive phototaxis is controlled by the red light photoreceptor TaxD1, negative phototaxis in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 is mediated by one or more (as yet) unidentified blue light photoreceptors...
  22. pmc Characterization of two thermostable cyanobacterial phytochromes reveals global movements in the chromophore-binding domain during photoconversion
    Andrew T Ulijasz
    Department of Genetics and National Magnetic Resonance Facility, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    J Biol Chem 283:21251-66. 2008
    ..We also generated a series of strongly red fluorescent derivatives of SyB-Cph1, which based on their small size and thermostability may be useful as cell biological reporters...
  23. ncbi request reprint Negative control of the high light-inducible hliA gene and implications for the activities of the NblS sensor kinase in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC 7942
    Anthony D Kappell
    Department of Biology, The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019, USA
    Arch Microbiol 186:403-13. 2006
    ..These results point to the evolutionary conservation of the HLR1 element and its importance in NblS-mediated signaling and yield new insight into NblS-mediated control of gene expression...