Gregory P Asner

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Condition and fate of logged forests in the Brazilian Amazon
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:12947-50. 2006
  2. ncbi request reprint Selective logging in the Brazilian Amazon
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Science 310:480-2. 2005
  3. pmc Amazonian functional diversity from forest canopy chemical assembly
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA 94305
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 111:5604-9. 2014
  4. ncbi request reprint Remote analysis of biological invasion and the impact of enemy release
    James R Kellner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Ecol Appl 21:2094-104. 2011
  5. pmc Environmental and community controls on plant canopy chemistry in a Mediterranean-type ecosystem
    Kyla M Dahlin
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:6895-900. 2013
  6. ncbi request reprint Leaf chemical and spectral diversity in Australian tropical forests
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Ecol Appl 19:236-53. 2009
  7. ncbi request reprint Multiscale analysis of tree cover and aboveground carbon stocks in pinyon-juniper woodlands
    Cho Ying Huang
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, California 94304, USA
    Ecol Appl 19:668-81. 2009
  8. doi request reprint A universal airborne LiDAR approach for tropical forest carbon mapping
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Oecologia 168:1147-60. 2012
  9. pmc High-resolution forest carbon stocks and emissions in the Amazon
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:16738-42. 2010
  10. doi request reprint Canopy phylogenetic, chemical and spectral assembly in a lowland Amazonian forest
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    New Phytol 189:999-1012. 2011

Detail Information

Publications45

  1. pmc Condition and fate of logged forests in the Brazilian Amazon
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:12947-50. 2006
    ..Under the management regimes in effect at the time of our study in the Brazilian Amazon, selective logging would not be sustained...
  2. ncbi request reprint Selective logging in the Brazilian Amazon
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Science 310:480-2. 2005
    ..Each year, 27 million to 50 million cubic meters of wood were extracted, and a gross flux of approximately 0.1 billion metric tons of carbon was destined for release to the atmosphere by logging...
  3. pmc Amazonian functional diversity from forest canopy chemical assembly
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA 94305
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 111:5604-9. 2014
    ..Geographically nested patterns of forest canopy chemical traits will play a role in determining the response and functional rearrangement of western Amazonian ecosystems to changing land use and climate. ..
  4. ncbi request reprint Remote analysis of biological invasion and the impact of enemy release
    James R Kellner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Ecol Appl 21:2094-104. 2011
    ..They also show how novel remote-sensing technology can be integrated with conservation and management to help address exotic plant invasions...
  5. pmc Environmental and community controls on plant canopy chemistry in a Mediterranean-type ecosystem
    Kyla M Dahlin
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:6895-900. 2013
    ..Environmental filtering and limits to similarity can act strongly, simultaneously, in a spatially heterogeneous environment, but the local-scale environmental gradients alone cannot account for the variation across this landscape...
  6. ncbi request reprint Leaf chemical and spectral diversity in Australian tropical forests
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Ecol Appl 19:236-53. 2009
    ....
  7. ncbi request reprint Multiscale analysis of tree cover and aboveground carbon stocks in pinyon-juniper woodlands
    Cho Ying Huang
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, California 94304, USA
    Ecol Appl 19:668-81. 2009
    ..0 +/- 22.7 Tg C. Our results show how multiple remote-sensing observations can be used to map cover and C stocks at high resolution in drylands, and they highlight the role of P-J ecosystems in the North American C budget...
  8. doi request reprint A universal airborne LiDAR approach for tropical forest carbon mapping
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Oecologia 168:1147-60. 2012
    ..With this approach, we propose to radically decrease the time required to calibrate airborne LiDAR data and thus increase the output of high-resolution carbon maps, supporting tropical forest conservation and climate mitigation policy...
  9. pmc High-resolution forest carbon stocks and emissions in the Amazon
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:16738-42. 2010
    ..Very high-resolution monitoring reduces uncertainty in carbon emissions for REDD programs while uncovering fundamental environmental controls on forest carbon storage and their interactions with land-use change...
  10. doi request reprint Canopy phylogenetic, chemical and spectral assembly in a lowland Amazonian forest
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    New Phytol 189:999-1012. 2011
    ..Spectranomics provides a new connection between remote sensing and community assembly theory in high-diversity tropical canopies...
  11. pmc Ground-based and remotely sensed nutrient availability across a tropical landscape
    Stephen Porder
    Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, 371 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:10909-12. 2005
    ..This pattern was corroborated by top-down remote sensing of area-integrated canopy phosphorus concentrations...
  12. doi request reprint Predicting tropical plant physiology from leaf and canopy spectroscopy
    Christopher E Doughty
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Oecologia 165:289-99. 2011
    ..5 ± 0.07 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) than are leaf spectra. The results indicate the potential for this technique to be used with high-fidelity imaging spectrometers to remotely sense tropical forest canopy photosynthesis...
  13. ncbi request reprint Taxonomy and remote sensing of leaf mass per area (LMA) in humid tropical forests
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Ecol Appl 21:85-98. 2011
    ..Our study indicates that remotely sensed patterns of LMA will be driven by taxonomic variation against a backdrop of environmental controls expressed at site and regional levels...
  14. pmc Large-scale impacts of herbivores on the structural diversity of African savannas
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:4947-52. 2009
    ..Our results are the first to quantitatively illustrate the extent to which herbivores can affect the 3-D structural diversity of vegetation across large savanna landscapes...
  15. doi request reprint Regional insight into savanna hydrogeomorphology from termite mounds
    Shaun R Levick
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nat Commun 1:65. 2010
    ..The mechanisms underlying future woody encroachment are not simply physiological responses to elevated temperatures and CO(2) levels but also involve hydrogeomorphological processes at the hillslope scale...
  16. pmc Invasive plants transform the three-dimensional structure of rain forests
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:4519-23. 2008
    ....
  17. ncbi request reprint Land-use allocation protects the Peruvian Amazon
    Paulo J C Oliveira
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Science 317:1233-6. 2007
    ..Although the region shows recent increases in disturbance and deforestation rates and leakage into forests surrounding concession areas, land-use policy and remoteness are serving to protect the Peruvian Amazon...
  18. pmc A tale of two "forests": random forest machine learning AIDS tropical forest carbon mapping
    Joseph Mascaro
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 9:e85993. 2014
    ..Our results suggest that spatial context should be considered when using Random Forest, and that doing so may result in substantially improved carbon stock modeling for purposes of climate change mitigation...
  19. ncbi request reprint Harvesting tree biomass at the stand level to assess the accuracy of field and airborne biomass estimation in savannas
    Matthew S Colgan
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Ecol Appl 23:1170-84. 2013
    ..These results provide a novel comparison of field and airborne biomass estimates using harvested plots and advance the role of lidar remote sensing in savanna ecosystems...
  20. ncbi request reprint Spatial patterns in the effects of fire on savanna vegetation three-dimensional structure
    Shaun R Levick
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution, 260 Panama St, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Ecol Appl 22:2110-21. 2012
    ..These results highlight the complexity of fire vegetation relationships in savanna systems, and they suggest that underlying landscape heterogeneity needs more explicit incorporation into fire management policies...
  21. doi request reprint Landscape-scale effects of herbivores on treefall in African savannas
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution, Stanford, CA, USA
    Ecol Lett 15:1211-7. 2012
    ..These landscape-scale patterns reveal environmental controls underpinning herbivore-mediated tree turnover, highlighting the need for context-dependent science and management...
  22. doi request reprint A contemporary assessment of change in humid tropical forests
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Conserv Biol 23:1386-95. 2009
    ..Our results highlight the enormous geographic extent of forest change throughout the humid tropics and the considerable limitations of the science and technology available for such a synthesis...
  23. ncbi request reprint Hyperspectral and LiDAR remote sensing of fire fuels in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park
    Timothy A Varga
    Earth Systems Program, Stanford University, 397 Panama Mall, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Ecol Appl 18:613-23. 2008
    ..4%, respectively. The results indicate that the fusion of hyperspectral and LiDAR remote sensing can provide unique information on the three-dimensional properties of ecosystems, their flammability, and the potential for fire spread...
  24. pmc Forest canopy gap distributions in the southern Peruvian Amazon
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e60875. 2013
    ..Consistency of λ-values strongly suggests similarity in the mechanisms of canopy failure across a diverse array of lowland forests in southwestern Amazonia...
  25. doi request reprint Contrasting leaf chemical traits in tropical lianas and trees: implications for future forest composition
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Ecol Lett 15:1001-7. 2012
    ..Differences in chemical traits suggest that liana expansion could be greatest in forests undergoing increased canopy-level irradiance via disturbance and climate change...
  26. pmc Human and environmental controls over aboveground carbon storage in Madagascar
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA USA
    Carbon Balance Manag 7:2. 2012
    ..abstract:..
  27. ncbi request reprint Landscape-level variation in forest structure and biogeochemistry across a substrate age gradient in Hawaii
    Peter Vitousek
    Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Ecology 90:3074-86. 2009
    ..This increasing heterogeneity was associated with a larger patch size of canopy turnover and with dominance of most secondary successional stands by the mat-forming fern Dicranopteris linearis in the older landscapes...
  28. ncbi request reprint Multi-trophic invasion resistance in Hawaii: bioacoustics, field surveys, and airborne remote sensing
    Natalie T Boelman
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Ecol Appl 17:2137-44. 2007
    ....
  29. ncbi request reprint Climate and management contributions to recent trends in U.S. agricultural yields
    David B Lobell
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Science 299:1032. 2003
  30. pmc Elevated rates of gold mining in the Amazon revealed through high-resolution monitoring
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA 94305
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:18454-9. 2013
    ..Our results prove that gold mining is growing more rapidly than previously thought, and that high-resolution monitoring approaches are required to accurately quantify human impacts on tropical forests. ..
  31. ncbi request reprint Environmental filtering and land-use history drive patterns in biomass accumulation in a mediterranean-type landscape
    Kyla M Dahlin
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Ecol Appl 22:104-18. 2012
    ....
  32. ncbi request reprint Genetic variation in leaf pigment, optical and photosynthetic function among diverse phenotypes of Metrosideros polymorpha grown in a common garden
    Roberta E Martin
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA
    Oecologia 151:387-400. 2007
    ....
  33. ncbi request reprint Climatic/edaphic controls on soil carbon/nitrogen response to shrub encroachment in desert grassland
    C Winston Wheeler
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Ecol Appl 17:1911-28. 2007
    ..Grassy sites in contrasting soil/elevation combinations, initially highly distinctive in their SOC pool size and delta13C, appear to be converging on similar values following approximately 100 years of woody plant proliferation...
  34. ncbi request reprint Drought impacts on the Amazon forest: the remote sensing perspective
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    New Phytol 187:569-78. 2010
    ....
  35. doi request reprint The velocity of climate change
    Scott R Loarie
    Carnegie Institution for Science, Department of Global Ecology, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Nature 462:1052-5. 2009
    ..Montane landscapes may effectively shelter many species into the next century. Elsewhere, reduced emissions, a much expanded network of protected areas, or efforts to increase species movement may be necessary...
  36. pmc Plants reverse warming effect on ecosystem water balance
    Erika S Zavaleta
    Department of Biological Sciences and Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:9892-3. 2003
    ..Our findings illustrate the potential for organism-environment interactions to modify the direction as well as the magnitude of global change effects on ecosystem functioning...
  37. pmc Integrating stand and soil properties to understand foliar nutrient dynamics during forest succession following slash-and-burn agriculture in the Bolivian Amazon
    Eben N Broadbent
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, California, United States of America Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America Sustainability Science Program, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 9:e86042. 2014
    ....
  38. doi request reprint Convergent structural responses of tropical forests to diverse disturbance regimes
    James R Kellner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Ecol Lett 12:887-97. 2009
    ....
  39. pmc Drought stress and carbon uptake in an Amazon forest measured with spaceborne imaging spectroscopy
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:6039-44. 2004
    ..Spaceborne imaging spectroscopy will increase the accuracy of ecological studies in humid tropical forests...
  40. pmc Remote analysis of biological invasion and biogeochemical change
    Gregory P Asner
    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:4383-6. 2005
    ..This remote sensing approach indicates the geographic extent, intensity, and biogeochemical impacts of two distinct invaders; its wider application could enhance the role of remote sensing in ecosystem analysis and management...
  41. ncbi request reprint Controls over foliar N:P ratios in tropical rain forests
    Alan R Townsend
    INSTAAR and Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA
    Ecology 88:107-18. 2007
    ..Thus any use of N:P ratios in the tropics to infer larger-scale ecosystem processes must comprehensively account for the diversity of any given site and recognize the broad range in nutrient requirements, even at the local scale...
  42. ncbi request reprint Woody plants in grasslands: post-encroachment stand dynamics
    Dawn M Browning
    School of Natural Resources, University of Arizona, P O Box 210043, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA
    Ecol Appl 18:928-44. 2008
    ..If woody cover has transitioned from directional increases to a dynamic equilibrium, biomass projections will require monitoring and modeling patch dynamics and stand structure rather than simply changes in total cover...
  43. ncbi request reprint Global consequences of land use
    Jonathan A Foley
    Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment SAGE, University of Wisconsin, 1710 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53726, USA
    Science 309:570-4. 2005
    ..We face the challenge of managing trade-offs between immediate human needs and maintaining the capacity of the biosphere to provide goods and services in the long term...
  44. ncbi request reprint Regional ecosystem structure and function: ecological insights from remote sensing of tropical forests
    Jeffrey Q Chambers
    Tulane University, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, 310 Dinwiddie Hall, New Orleans, LA 70118, USA
    Trends Ecol Evol 22:414-23. 2007
    ..Issues that we address here include forest response to altered precipitation regimes, regional disturbance and land-use patterns, invasive species and landscape carbon balance...
  45. ncbi request reprint Recovery of forest structure and spectral properties after selective logging in lowland Bolivia
    Eben N Broadbent
    School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA
    Ecol Appl 16:1148-63. 2006
    ....