A M Arvin

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Humoral and cellular immune responses in children given annual immunization with trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine
    Alenka M Zeman
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5208, USA
    Pediatr Infect Dis J 26:107-15. 2007
  2. ncbi request reprint Antiviral therapy for varicella and herpes zoster
    Ann M Arvin
    Department of Pediatrics and Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305, USA
    Semin Pediatr Infect Dis 13:12-21. 2002
  3. ncbi request reprint Debate: the argument against. Should all pregnant women be offered type-specific serological screening for HSV infection?
    Ann M Arvin
    Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Stanford University, CA 94305 5208, USA
    Herpes 9:48-50. 2002
  4. doi request reprint Analysis of the functions of glycoproteins E and I and their promoters during VZV replication in vitro and in skin and T-cell xenografts in the SCID mouse model of VZV pathogenesis
    Ann M Arvin
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Curr Top Microbiol Immunol 342:129-46. 2010
  5. ncbi request reprint Varicella-zoster virus: molecular virology and virus-host interactions
    A M Arvin
    G 312, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Curr Opin Microbiol 4:442-9. 2001
  6. ncbi request reprint Varlirix (GlaxoSmithKline)
    Ann M Arvin
    Stanford University, CA 94305 5208, USA
    Curr Opin Investig Drugs 3:996-9. 2002
  7. doi request reprint Varicella-zoster virus T cell tropism and the pathogenesis of skin infection
    Ann M Arvin
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Curr Top Microbiol Immunol 342:189-209. 2010
  8. doi request reprint Humoral and cellular immunity to varicella-zoster virus: an overview
    Ann M Arvin
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Infect Dis 197:S58-60. 2008
  9. ncbi request reprint Memory cytotoxic T cell responses to viral tegument and regulatory proteins encoded by open reading frames 4, 10, 29, and 62 of varicella-zoster virus
    Ann M Arvin
    Department of Pediatrics Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Viral Immunol 15:507-16. 2002
  10. ncbi request reprint Investigations of the pathogenesis of Varicella zoster virus infection in the SCIDhu mouse model
    Ann M Arvin
    Departments of Pediatrics, and Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Herpes 13:75-80. 2006

Detail Information

Publications93

  1. ncbi request reprint Humoral and cellular immune responses in children given annual immunization with trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine
    Alenka M Zeman
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5208, USA
    Pediatr Infect Dis J 26:107-15. 2007
    ..There have been no prior reports of the frequency of circulating influenza-specific, interferon gamma-producing memory CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells in healthy children who have received multiple influenza immunizations...
  2. ncbi request reprint Antiviral therapy for varicella and herpes zoster
    Ann M Arvin
    Department of Pediatrics and Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305, USA
    Semin Pediatr Infect Dis 13:12-21. 2002
    ..The morbidity and mortality of VZV infections are reduced substantially by initiating acyclovir treatment early in the course of the disease...
  3. ncbi request reprint Debate: the argument against. Should all pregnant women be offered type-specific serological screening for HSV infection?
    Ann M Arvin
    Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Stanford University, CA 94305 5208, USA
    Herpes 9:48-50. 2002
    ..Practical benefit can be achieved by counselling all pregnant women against oral or unprotected sexual contact during pregnancy...
  4. doi request reprint Analysis of the functions of glycoproteins E and I and their promoters during VZV replication in vitro and in skin and T-cell xenografts in the SCID mouse model of VZV pathogenesis
    Ann M Arvin
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Curr Top Microbiol Immunol 342:129-46. 2010
    ..Further analysis of VZV gE and gI functions and their interactions with other viral and host cell proteins are important areas for studies of VZV replication and pathogenesis...
  5. ncbi request reprint Varicella-zoster virus: molecular virology and virus-host interactions
    A M Arvin
    G 312, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Curr Opin Microbiol 4:442-9. 2001
    ..How specific VZV gene products contribute to viral replication has been further defined, and effects of VZV on expression of cellular genes have been demonstrated...
  6. ncbi request reprint Varlirix (GlaxoSmithKline)
    Ann M Arvin
    Stanford University, CA 94305 5208, USA
    Curr Opin Investig Drugs 3:996-9. 2002
    ..By the end of 1998, Varilrix was available in a few European countries and in India [284490], [455138]. By 2001, the vaccine was also available in Brazil and Hong Kong [396267]...
  7. doi request reprint Varicella-zoster virus T cell tropism and the pathogenesis of skin infection
    Ann M Arvin
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Curr Top Microbiol Immunol 342:189-209. 2010
    ....
  8. doi request reprint Humoral and cellular immunity to varicella-zoster virus: an overview
    Ann M Arvin
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Infect Dis 197:S58-60. 2008
  9. ncbi request reprint Memory cytotoxic T cell responses to viral tegument and regulatory proteins encoded by open reading frames 4, 10, 29, and 62 of varicella-zoster virus
    Ann M Arvin
    Department of Pediatrics Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    Viral Immunol 15:507-16. 2002
    ..Adaptive immunity to VZV is characterized by a broad repertoire of memory CTL responses to proteins that comprise the virion tegument and regulate viral gene expression in infected cells...
  10. ncbi request reprint Investigations of the pathogenesis of Varicella zoster virus infection in the SCIDhu mouse model
    Ann M Arvin
    Departments of Pediatrics, and Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Herpes 13:75-80. 2006
    ..This would be characterized by the retention of infectivity in skin combined with a restricted tropism for T-cells and neurons within sensory ganglia...
  11. ncbi request reprint Vaccine development to prevent cytomegalovirus disease: report from the National Vaccine Advisory Committee
    Ann M Arvin
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Clin Infect Dis 39:233-9. 2004
    ..Support of government agencies for CMV vaccine research and development is critical to address this need...
  12. pmc Construction of varicella-zoster virus recombinants from parent Oka cosmids and demonstration that ORF65 protein is dispensable for infection of human skin and T cells in the SCID-hu mouse model
    Takahiro Niizuma
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Virol 77:6062-5. 2003
    ..Using the SCID-hu mouse model, we demonstrated that the ORF65 protein is dispensable for viral replication in skin and T cells, which are critical host cell targets during primary varicella-zoster virus infection...
  13. pmc Mutational analysis of open reading frames 62 and 71, encoding the varicella-zoster virus immediate-early transactivating protein, IE62, and effects on replication in vitro and in skin xenografts in the SCID-hu mouse in vivo
    Bunji Sato
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Virol 77:5607-20. 2003
    ..Although insertion of ORF62 into the nonnative site permitted replication in cell culture, ORF62 expression from its native site was necessary for cell-cell spread in differentiated human skin tissues in vivo...
  14. pmc The immediate-early 63 protein of Varicella-Zoster virus: analysis of functional domains required for replication in vitro and for T-cell and skin tropism in the SCIDhu model in vivo
    Armin Baiker
    Departments of Pediatrics and Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Virol 78:1181-94. 2004
    ....
  15. ncbi request reprint Deficiency of the humoral immune response to measles vaccine in infants immunized at age 6 months
    H A Gans
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Calif 94305 5208, USA
    JAMA 280:527-32. 1998
    ..Infants of mothers with vaccine-induced immunity may lose passively acquired antibodies before 12 months, leaving them susceptible to measles infection...
  16. ncbi request reprint Safety and efficacy of high-dose intravenous acyclovir in the management of neonatal herpes simplex virus infections
    D W Kimberlin
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Alabama 35233, USA
    Pediatrics 108:230-8. 2001
    ..In addition, an estimate of therapeutic efficacy was sought, both with respect to mortality and to morbidity. Virologic efficacy of HD acyclovir was also assessed...
  17. pmc The ORF47 and ORF66 putative protein kinases of varicella-zoster virus determine tropism for human T cells and skin in the SCID-hu mouse
    J F Moffat
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 95:11969-74. 1998
    ..The requirement for ORF47 expression in T cells and skin indicates that this gene product, which is dispensable in vitro, has a critical role within differentiated cells that are essential targets for VZV pathogenesis in vivo...
  18. pmc Mutational analysis of the repeated open reading frames, ORFs 63 and 70 and ORFs 64 and 69, of varicella-zoster virus
    M H Sommer
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5208, USA
    J Virol 75:8224-39. 2001
    ..Finally, all of the deletion mutants that yielded recombinants retained infectivity for human T cells in vitro and replicated efficiently in human skin in the SCIDhu mouse model of VZV pathogenesis...
  19. pmc Functions of the unique N-terminal region of glycoprotein E in the pathogenesis of varicella-zoster virus infection
    Barbara Berarducci
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:282-7. 2010
    ..VZV tropism for T cells and skin, which is necessary for its life cycle in the human host, requires this nonconserved region of the N-terminal region of VZV gE...
  20. pmc Varicella-zoster virus
    A M Arvin
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5119, USA
    Clin Microbiol Rev 9:361-81. 1996
    ..A live attenuated varicella vaccine (Oka/Merck strain) is now recommended for routine childhood immunization...
  21. ncbi request reprint IL-12, IFN-gamma, and T cell proliferation to measles in immunized infants
    H A Gans
    Infectious Diseases Division, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305, USA
    J Immunol 162:5569-75. 1999
    ..In summary, infant T cells were primed with measles Ag despite the presence of passive Abs, but their adaptive immune responses were limited compared with those of adults...
  22. ncbi request reprint Varicella-zoster virus IE63, a virion component expressed during latency and acute infection, elicits humoral and cellular immunity
    C Sadzot-Delvaux
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, California, USA
    J Infect Dis 178:S43-7. 1998
    ..T cell recognition of IE63 and other VZV proteins is one of the likely mechanisms involved in controlling VZV reactivation from latency...
  23. pmc Mutational analysis of the varicella-zoster virus ORF62/63 intergenic region
    Jeremy O Jones
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    J Virol 80:3116-21. 2006
    ..This first analysis of the ORF62/63 intergenic region in the context of VZV replication indicates that it is a dual promoter and that cellular transregulatory factors affect the transcription of these key VZV regulatory genes...
  24. ncbi request reprint Analysis of the persistence of humoral and cellular immunity in children and adults immunized with varicella vaccine
    L Zerboni
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5208, USA
    J Infect Dis 177:1701-4. 1998
    ..In summary, varicella immunization induced long-term humoral and cellular immunity, and initial differences between cell-mediated responses in children and adults diminished over time...
  25. pmc Promoter sequences of varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein I targeted by cellular transactivating factors Sp1 and USF determine virulence in skin and T cells in SCIDhu mice in vivo
    Hideki Ito
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University, California 94305, USA
    J Virol 77:489-98. 2003
    ....
  26. ncbi request reprint Identification of CD8+ T cell epitopes in the immediate early 62 protein (IE62) of varicella-zoster virus, and evaluation of frequency of CD8+ T cell response to IE62, by use of IE62 peptides after varicella vaccination
    Christian R Frey
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA, and Faculty of Biosciences, University of Witten Herdecke, Witten, Germany
    J Infect Dis 188:40-52. 2003
    ..Varicella vaccination of 3 VZV-immune subjects was associated with increases in IE62 peptide-specific CD8(+) T cells, a finding indicating that in vivo re-exposure boosts memory immunity to this important viral protein...
  27. pmc Varicella-Zoster virus pathogenesis and immunobiology: new concepts emerging from investigations with the SCIDhu mouse model
    Chia Chi Ku
    Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Dr, Room G 311, Stanford, CA 94305 5119, USA
    J Virol 79:2651-8. 2005
  28. pmc Role of the varicella-zoster virus gene product encoded by open reading frame 35 in viral replication in vitro and in differentiated human skin and T cells in vivo
    Hideki Ito
    Department of Pediatrics and Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, G 311, 300 Pasteur Dr, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Virol 79:4819-27. 2005
    ....
  29. pmc Differential requirement for cell fusion and virion formation in the pathogenesis of varicella-zoster virus infection in skin and T cells
    Jaya Besser
    Stanford University, Department of Pediatrics, 300 Pasteur Dr, G 311, Stanford, CA 94305 5208, USA
    J Virol 78:13293-305. 2004
    ..These observations suggest a differential requirement for cell fusion and virion formation in the pathogenesis of VZV infection in skin and T cells...
  30. ncbi request reprint Varicella-zoster virus infection of a human CD4-positive T-cell line
    L Zerboni
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5208, USA
    Virology 270:278-85. 2000
    ..In vitro infection of II-23 cells will be useful for further analysis of VZV tropism for T-lymphocytes...
  31. pmc Immune responses to mumps vaccine in adults who were vaccinated in childhood
    Rima Hanna-Wakim
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5208, USA
    J Infect Dis 197:1669-75. 2008
    ..In a mumps outbreak in the United States, many infected individuals were adults who had received 2 doses of mumps vaccine. The persistence of cellular immunity to mumps vaccine has not been defined...
  32. pmc Functions of Varicella-zoster virus ORF23 capsid protein in viral replication and the pathogenesis of skin infection
    Vaishali Chaudhuri
    Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Dr, S 354, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Virol 82:10231-46. 2008
    ..If so, ORF23 expression could be a target for a novel antiviral drug against VZV...
  33. pmc ORF66 protein kinase function is required for T-cell tropism of varicella-zoster virus in vivo
    Anne Schaap-Nutt
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5208, USA
    J Virol 80:11806-16. 2006
    ..The G102A mutation reduced the antiapoptotic effects of VZV infection of T cells. These experiments indicate that the T-cell tropism of VZV depends upon intact ORF66 protein kinase function...
  34. pmc Varicella-zoster virus infection of human neural cells in vivo
    Armin Baiker
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:10792-7. 2004
    ..The chimeric nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient mouse model may be useful for investigating other neurotropic human viruses...
  35. ncbi request reprint Use of an inactivated varicella vaccine in recipients of hematopoietic-cell transplants
    Atsuko Hata
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif 94305 5208, USA
    N Engl J Med 347:26-34. 2002
    ..The reactivation of varicella-zoster virus from latency causes zoster and is common among recipients of hematopoietic-cell transplants...
  36. ncbi request reprint Varicella-zoster virus infection facilitates VZV glycoprotein E trafficking to the membrane surface of melanoma cells
    Chengjun Mo
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Med Virol 70:S56-8. 2003
    ..gE became detectable mostly at the TGN and on the cell surface after viral infection. These data indicate that viral proteins facilitate the trafficking and cell surface expression of gE...
  37. pmc Comparison of the influenza virus-specific effector and memory B-cell responses to immunization of children and adults with live attenuated or inactivated influenza virus vaccines
    Sanae Sasaki
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA, USA
    J Virol 81:215-28. 2007
    ....
  38. ncbi request reprint Antiviral CD8 T cells in the control of primary human cytomegalovirus infection in early childhood
    Sharon F Chen
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Infect Dis 189:1619-27. 2004
    ..Because these healthy children continue to have local CMV replication, we suggest that CD8 T cells may function primarily to prevent symptomatic, disseminated disease...
  39. pmc Requirement of varicella-zoster virus immediate-early 4 protein for viral replication
    Bunji Sato
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Virol 77:12369-72. 2003
    ..Transfections with these mutant cosmids yielded no virus, indicating that this KYFKC motif was essential for IE4 function...
  40. ncbi request reprint The epidemiology of neonatal herpes simplex virus infections in California from 1985 to 1995
    K M Gutierrez
    Division of Pediatric Infectious Disease, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Infect Dis 180:199-202. 1999
    ..From 1985 to 1995 there was no decrease in the rate of secondary diagnosis of genital HSV in delivering women...
  41. pmc Cellular immune responses in children and adults receiving inactivated or live attenuated influenza vaccines
    Xiao Song He
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Virol 80:11756-66. 2006
    ..In conclusion, our findings identify age, type of vaccine, and prevaccination levels of immune reactivity to influenza A virus as factors significantly associated with the magnitude of cellular immune responses to influenza vaccines...
  42. pmc Aberrant infection and persistence of varicella-zoster virus in human dorsal root ganglia in vivo in the absence of glycoprotein I
    Leigh Zerboni
    Departments of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:14086-91. 2007
    ..The observations demonstrate that gI is important for VZV neurotropism and suggest that a strategy to reduce neurovirulence by deleting gI could prolong active infection in human DRGs...
  43. pmc Cellular and viral factors regulate the varicella-zoster virus gE promoter during viral replication
    Barbara Berarducci
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Dr, Rm G312, Stanford, CA 94305 5208, USA
    J Virol 81:10258-67. 2007
    ..These results indicate that Sp1 is required for IE62-mediated transactivation of the gE promoter and that this transcriptional factor appears to be the only cellular factor essential for regulation of the gE promoter...
  44. pmc Varicella-zoster virus immediate-early protein 62 blocks interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) phosphorylation at key serine residues: a novel mechanism of IRF3 inhibition among herpesviruses
    Nandini Sen
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Room S356, Grant Building, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5208, USA
    J Virol 84:9240-53. 2010
    ..Thus, IE62 has two critical but discrete roles following VZV entry: to induce expression of VZV genes and to disarm the IFN-dependent antiviral defense through a novel mechanism that prevents IRF3 phosphorylation...
  45. pmc The ubiquitous cellular transcriptional factor USF targets the varicella-zoster virus open reading frame 10 promoter and determines virulence in human skin xenografts in SCIDhu mice in vivo
    Xibing Che
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5208, USA
    J Virol 81:3229-39. 2007
    ....
  46. pmc Anti-glycoprotein H antibody impairs the pathogenicity of varicella-zoster virus in skin xenografts in the SCID mouse model
    Susan E Vleck
    Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Virol 84:141-52. 2010
    ..As a consequence, antibody interference with gH function would likely prevent or significantly reduce VZV replication in skin during primary or recurrent infection...
  47. pmc Entrapment of viral capsids in nuclear PML cages is an intrinsic antiviral host defense against varicella-zoster virus
    Mike Reichelt
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    PLoS Pathog 7:e1001266. 2011
    ..The efficient sequestration of virion capsids in PML cages appears to be the outcome of a basic cytoprotective function of this distinctive category of PML-NBs in sensing and safely containing nuclear aggregates of aberrant proteins...
  48. pmc Essential functions of the unique N-terminal region of the varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein E ectodomain in viral replication and in the pathogenesis of skin infection
    Barbara Berarducci
    Department of Pediatrics and Microbiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Dr, Rm G312, Stanford, CA 94305 5208, USA
    J Virol 80:9481-96. 2006
    ....
  49. pmc Varicella zoster disease of the central nervous system: epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory features 10 years after the introduction of the varicella vaccine
    Barbara A Pahud
    Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, University of California, San Francisco, USA
    J Infect Dis 203:316-23. 2011
    ....
  50. pmc Mutagenesis of varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein B: putative fusion loop residues are essential for viral replication, and the furin cleavage motif contributes to pathogenesis in skin tissue in vivo
    Stefan L Oliver
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Virol 83:7495-506. 2009
    ..This is the first evidence that cleavage of a herpesvirus fusion protein contributes to viral pathogenesis in vivo, as seen for fusion proteins in other virus families...
  51. pmc Identification and functional characterization of the Varicella zoster virus ORF11 gene product
    Xibing Che
    Departments of Pediatrics and Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Virology 412:156-66. 2011
    ....
  52. doi request reprint Varicella in the fetus and newborn
    Candice K Smith
    Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, G322, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Semin Fetal Neonatal Med 14:209-17. 2009
    ..Serious infection can be prevented with passive antibody prophylaxis and antiviral therapy. Maternal herpes zoster does not result in adverse fetal or neonatal outcomes...
  53. pmc The replication cycle of varicella-zoster virus: analysis of the kinetics of viral protein expression, genome synthesis, and virion assembly at the single-cell level
    Mike Reichelt
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Dr, Grant Bldg, Room S356, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Virol 83:3904-18. 2009
    ..Our results define the productive cycle of VZV infection in a single cell as occurring in 9 to 12 h...
  54. pmc Effects of interleukin-12 and interleukin-15 on measles-specific T-cell responses in vaccinated infants
    Hayley A Gans
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5208, USA
    Viral Immunol 21:163-72. 2008
    ..These observations suggest that lower measles-specific T-cell immune responses elicited by measles vaccine in infants may be due to diminished levels of key cytokines...
  55. pmc Functions of the ORF9-to-ORF12 gene cluster in varicella-zoster virus replication and in the pathogenesis of skin infection
    Xibing Che
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Virol 82:5825-34. 2008
    ....
  56. doi request reprint Phenotypic changes in influenza-specific CD8+ T cells after immunization of children and adults with influenza vaccines
    Xiao Song He
    Departments of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford
    J Infect Dis 197:803-11. 2008
    ..These differences are potentially affected by the different routes of vaccination and pathways of antigen presentation for TIV and LAIV...
  57. pmc Regulation of the ORF61 promoter and ORF61 functions in varicella-zoster virus replication and pathogenesis
    Li Wang
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, S356, Stanford, CA 94305 5208, USA
    J Virol 83:7560-72. 2009
    ....
  58. pmc Mechanisms of varicella-zoster virus neuropathogenesis in human dorsal root ganglia
    Mike Reichelt
    Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Dr, Grant Bldg, Room S356, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Virol 82:3971-83. 2008
    ..These mechanisms of VZV neuropathogenesis help to account for the often severe neurologic consequences of herpes zoster...
  59. pmc Mutagenesis of varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein I (gI) identifies a cysteine residue critical for gE/gI heterodimer formation, gI structure, and virulence in skin cells
    Stefan L Oliver
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Virol 85:4095-110. 2011
    ..Thus, residues C95 and 105 to 125 are critical for gI structure required for gE/gI heterodimer formation, virion incorporation, and ultimately, effective viral spread in human skin...
  60. pmc Baseline levels of influenza-specific CD4 memory T-cells affect T-cell responses to influenza vaccines
    Xiao Song He
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e2574. 2008
    ..Factors affecting immune responses to influenza vaccines have not been studied systematically. We hypothesized that T-cell and antibody responses to the vaccines are functions of pre-existing host immunity against influenza antigens...
  61. ncbi request reprint Variability and gender differences in memory T cell immunity to varicella-zoster virus in healthy adults
    Nicola P Klein
    Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 520, USA
    Vaccine 24:5913-8. 2006
    ..Taken together, results suggest that further studies regarding immunization of younger adults and females with the modified, high-potency live attenuated VZV vaccine may be warranted...
  62. ncbi request reprint Long term antiviral suppression after treatment for neonatal herpes infection
    Kathleen Gutierrez
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Pediatr Infect Dis J 22:371-2. 2003
  63. ncbi request reprint Measles and mumps vaccination as a model to investigate the developing immune system: passive and active immunity during the first year of life
    Hayley Gans
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Rm G312, Stanford, CA 94305 5208, USA
    Vaccine 21:3398-405. 2003
    ..Rather than being detrimental to infant adaptive immune responses, maternal vaccination can be coupled effectively with vaccine regimens that elicit priming of antiviral immune responses in infants during the first year of life...
  64. ncbi request reprint Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to an early 2-dose measles vaccination regimen in the United States
    Hayley A Gans
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5208, USA
    J Infect Dis 190:83-90. 2004
    ..Shifts in peak measles incidence to children <12 months old and the associated high mortality support the study of an early 2-dose measles vaccine regimen...
  65. ncbi request reprint T cell immunity to measles viral proteins in infants and adults after measles immunization
    Hayley A Gans
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5208, USA
    Viral Immunol 17:298-307. 2004
    ..The measles-specific T cell adaptive response of infants is limited compared to adults, including responses to the F protein...
  66. pmc Varicella-zoster virus transfer to skin by T Cells and modulation of viral replication by epidermal cell interferon-alpha
    Chia Chi Ku
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Exp Med 200:917-25. 2004
    ..Modulation of VZV replication by cutaneous innate immunity may avoid an incapacitating infection of the host that would limit opportunities for VZV transmission...
  67. pmc T cell-dependent production of IFN-gamma by NK cells in response to influenza A virus
    Xiao Song He
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University of School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Clin Invest 114:1812-9. 2004
    ..Taken together, these results suggest that at an early stage of recurrent viral infection, NK-mediated innate immunity to the virus is enhanced by preexisting virus-specific T cells...
  68. ncbi request reprint Analysis of varicella zoster virus attenuation by evaluation of chimeric parent Oka/vaccine Oka recombinant viruses in skin xenografts in the SCIDhu mouse model
    Leigh Zerboni
    Department of Pediatrics, S 356, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 5208, USA
    Virology 332:337-46. 2005
    ..Chimeric viruses containing different vOka components retained the attenuation phenotype, suggesting that vOka attenuation is multi-factorial and can be produced by genes from different regions of the vOka genome...
  69. pmc Varicella-zoster virus infection of human dorsal root ganglia in vivo
    Leigh Zerboni
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:6490-5. 2005
    ..VZV-infected T cells transferred virus from the circulation into DRG, suggesting that VZV lymphotropism facilitates its neurotropism. DRG xenografts may be useful for investigating neuropathogenic mechanisms of other human viruses...
  70. ncbi request reprint Chickenpox party or varicella vaccine?
    Sophie Hambleton
    Columbia University, Department of Pediatrics, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Adv Exp Med Biol 568:11-24. 2005
    ..In the case of VZV, the epidemiology of herpes zoster must be tracked as well as varicella disease trends. The prevention of herpes zoster may be another use of live attenuated or inactivated varicella vaccines...
  71. pmc Varicella-zoster virus open reading frame 10 is a virulence determinant in skin cells but not in T cells in vivo
    Xibing Che
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5208, USA
    J Virol 80:3238-48. 2006
    ..We conclude that ORF10 protein is required for efficient VZV virion assembly and is a specific determinant of VZV virulence in epidermal and dermal cells in vivo...
  72. pmc Microarray analysis of host cell gene transcription in response to varicella-zoster virus infection of human T cells and fibroblasts in vitro and SCIDhu skin xenografts in vivo
    Jeremy O Jones
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University, California 94305, USA
    J Virol 77:1268-80. 2003
    ....
  73. pmc Tropism of varicella-zoster virus for human tonsillar CD4(+) T lymphocytes that express activation, memory, and skin homing markers
    Chia Chi Ku
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Virol 76:11425-33. 2002
    ..Viral transfer to migrating T cells in the tonsils may facilitate cell-associated viremia, and preferential infection of CD4 T cells that express skin homing markers may enhance VZV transport to cutaneous sites of replication...
  74. ncbi request reprint Viral and cellular gene transcription in fibroblasts infected with small plaque mutants of varicella-zoster virus
    Jeremy O Jones
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University, 300 Pasteur Drive, Rm G312, Stanford, CA, USA
    Antiviral Res 68:56-65. 2005
    ....
  75. pmc Development of recombinant varicella-zoster viruses expressing luciferase fusion proteins for live in vivo imaging in human skin and dorsal root ganglia xenografts
    Stefan L Oliver
    Departments of Pediatrics and Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, United States
    J Virol Methods 154:182-93. 2008
    ..Thus, IE63-luciferase fusion proteins were effective for investigating VZV infection and antiviral activity in human xenografts...
  76. ncbi request reprint Natural history of neonatal herpes simplex virus infections in the acyclovir era
    D W Kimberlin
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35233, USA
    Pediatrics 108:223-9. 2001
    ..The objective of this study was to provide an update of neonatal HSV disease to identify means by which future improvements in the management of HSV-infected neonates can be made...
  77. ncbi request reprint Immune responses to measles and mumps vaccination of infants at 6, 9, and 12 months
    H Gans
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5208, USA
    J Infect Dis 184:817-26. 2001
    ..T cell responses can be established by immunization with these live attenuated virus vaccines during the first year, despite the presence of passive antibodies...
  78. pmc Glycoprotein E of varicella-zoster virus enhances cell-cell contact in polarized epithelial cells
    C Mo
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Virol 74:11377-87. 2000
    ..These observations suggest that VZV gE and gE/gI may contribute to viral pathogenesis by facilitating epithelial cell-cell contacts...
  79. ncbi request reprint Granulysin blocks replication of varicella-zoster virus and triggers apoptosis of infected cells
    A Hata
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305-5208, USA
    Viral Immunol 14:125-33. 2001
    ..Because granulysin is a product of natural killer cells and T lymphocytes, it is possible that its antiviral activity may act as a mediator of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms...
  80. pmc Modulation of major histocompatibility class II protein expression by varicella-zoster virus
    A Abendroth
    Departments of Pediatrics and Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5208, USA
    J Virol 74:1900-7. 2000
    ....
  81. ncbi request reprint Varicella-Zoster virus: pathogenesis, immunity, and clinical management in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients
    A M Arvin
    Infectious Disease Division, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305 5208, USA
    Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 6:219-30. 2000
    ..Antiviral therapy compensates for some of the deficiencies in VZV immunity in HCT recipients, and inactivated varicella vaccine may be useful for the early reconstitution of adaptive immunity to VZV after HCT...
  82. pmc Glycoprotein I of varicella-zoster virus is required for viral replication in skin and T cells
    Jennifer Moffat
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York 13210, USA
    J Virol 76:8468-71. 2002
    ..The parental and repaired viruses grew in human skin and thymus/liver implants, but the gI deletion mutant was not infectious. Thus, gI is essential for VZV infectivity in skin and T cells...
  83. ncbi request reprint The requirement of varicella zoster virus glycoprotein E (gE) for viral replication and effects of glycoprotein I on gE in melanoma cells
    Chengjun Mo
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 93405, USA
    Virology 304:176-86. 2002
    ....
  84. ncbi request reprint Analysis of the frequencies and of the memory T cell phenotypes of human CD8+ T cells specific for influenza A viruses
    Xiao Song He
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    J Infect Dis 187:1075-84. 2003
    ..The different patterns of CD27 expression in influenza virus- and cytomegalovirus-specific CD8+ T cells suggest that influenza virus-specific memory and effector CD8+ T cells can be differentiated by phenotypic analysis...
  85. ncbi request reprint A phase 1 study of 4 live, recombinant human cytomegalovirus Towne/Toledo chimeric vaccines
    Thomas C Heineman
    Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, and Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Children s Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, OH, USA
    J Infect Dis 193:1350-60. 2006
    ..Although not evaluated for this indication, live attenuated HCMV vaccines based on the Towne strain are well-tolerated and have demonstrated moderate efficacy in other clinical settings...
  86. ncbi request reprint New viral vaccines
    Ann M Arvin
    Virology 344:240-9. 2006
    ..Hence, as Virology celebrates its 50th anniversary, it is appropriate to examine these examples of recent advances in viral vaccines...
  87. pmc T-cell tropism and the role of ORF66 protein in pathogenesis of varicella-zoster virus infection
    Anne Schaap
    Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5208, USA
    J Virol 79:12921-33. 2005
    ..These observations suggest that the ORF66 kinase plays a unique role during infection of T cells and supports VZV T-cell tropism by contributing to immune evasion and enhancing survival of infected T cells...
  88. ncbi request reprint Immunogenicity of aerosol measles vaccine given as the primary measles immunization to nine-month-old Mexican children
    Rosa Maria Wong-Chew
    Departamento de Medicina Experimental, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Dr Balmis 148, Colonia Doctores, 06726 Mexico City, Mexico
    Vaccine 24:683-90. 2006
    ..The objective of the study was to evaluate immunogenicity to aerosol measles vaccine in 9-month-old children...
  89. ncbi request reprint Effect of maternal herpes simplex virus (HSV) serostatus and HSV type on risk of neonatal herpes
    Elizabeth L Brown
    Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98122, USA, and Department of Pediatrics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
    Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 86:523-9. 2007
    ..We have conducted pooled analyses of data from 3 cohorts to evaluate the effects of maternal HSV serostatus and HSV type on risk of neonatal HSV acquisition and severity...
  90. pmc Functions of the C-terminal domain of varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein E in viral replication in vitro and skin and T-cell tropism in vivo
    Jennifer Moffat
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, 750 East Adams Street, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA
    J Virol 78:12406-15. 2004
    ....
  91. ncbi request reprint Induction of cellular and humoral immunity after aerosol or subcutaneous administration of Edmonston-Zagreb measles vaccine as a primary dose to 12-month-old children
    Rosa Maria Wong-Chew
    Dept de Medicina Experimental, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico
    J Infect Dis 189:254-7. 2004
    ..01). Measles-specific T and B cell responses were weaker after aerosol than after sc vaccination, indicating a need to use a higher aerosol dose to achieve optimal immunogenicity...
  92. pmc Differentiation of varicella-zoster virus ORF47 protein kinase and IE62 protein binding domains and their contributions to replication in human skin xenografts in the SCID-hu mouse
    Jaya Besser
    Department of Pediatrics and Microbiology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Virol 77:5964-74. 2003
    ....
  93. pmc A self-excisable infectious bacterial artificial chromosome clone of varicella-zoster virus allows analysis of the essential tegument protein encoded by ORF9
    B Karsten Tischer
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
    J Virol 81:13200-8. 2007
    ..The essential nature of ORF9 for VZV replication was ultimately confirmed by restoration of the growth of the ORF9-deficient mutant virus using trans-complementation via baculovirus-mediated gene transfer...

Research Grants50

  1. Varicella-zoster Virus Tegument Proteins in Pathogenesis
    Ann Arvin; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..A better understanding of the genetic mechanisms that are required for VZV virulence in skin, T cells and neural cells will guide the design of 'second generation' live attenuated varicella vaccines. ..
  2. Varicella-zoster Virus: Tegument Proteins in Pathogenesis
    Ann M Arvin; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..abstract_text> ..
  3. VARICELLA ZOSTER VIRUS--T CELL/SKIN TROPISMS AND IMMUNIT
    Ann Arvin; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..These parallel investigations of VZV pathogenesis and immunity are directly linked by their practical relevance for improving live attenuated varicella vaccines. ..
  4. Varicella-zoster Virus Tegument Proteins in Pathogenesis
    Ann Arvin; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..A better understanding of the genetic mechanisms that are required for VZV virulence in skin, T cells and neural cells will guide the design of 'second generation' live attenuated varicella vaccines. ..
  5. Varicella-Zoster Virus: T Cell/Skin Tropism & Immunity
    Ann M Arvin; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Our goal is to identify strategies for creating better vaccines to prevent VZV infections in healthy and high risk people. ..
  6. Varicella-zoster Virus: Tegument Proteins in Pathogenesis
    Ann Arvin; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..abstract_text> ..
  7. Varicella-Zoster Virus: T Cell/Skin Tropisms & Immunity
    Ann Arvin; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..abstract_text> ..
  8. Protective Mechanisms Against Pandemic Respiratory Virus
    Ann Arvin; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..These innovations will have broad relevance for for understanding human immunity against microbial pathogens of concern for biodefense. ..
  9. ONTOGENY OF MEASLES IMMUNITY IN INFANTS
    Ann Arvin; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Understanding the maturation of host responses to viral antigens during the first year of life has general relevance for vaccine strategies in infancy. ..
  10. Varicella-zoster Virus Tegument Proteins in Pathogenesis
    Ann Arvin; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..1 Description, ..
  11. VIRAL GASTROENTERITIS--BASIS OF PROTECTION AND VIRULENCE
    Ann Arvin; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..In order to better understand the molecular and virologic basis of virulence and/or host tropism, we will identify relevant steps in the viral replication cycle in vivo that are restricted on the basis of host range. ..
  12. ONTOGENY OF MEASLES IMMUNITY IN INFANTS
    Ann Arvin; Fiscal Year: 1999
  13. IMMUNITY & VIRAL REPLICATION IN CHILDREN WITH VARICELLA
    Ann Arvin; Fiscal Year: 1993
    ....