R B Altman

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Whole-genome expression analysis: challenges beyond clustering
    R B Altman
    Stanford Medical Informatics, 251 Campus Drive, MSOB X 215, Stanford, California 95305 5479, USA
    Curr Opin Struct Biol 11:340-7. 2001
  2. ncbi request reprint Constraining volume by matching the moments of a distance distribution
    C C Chen
    Section on Medical Informatics, Stanford University, CA 94305 5479, USA
    Comput Appl Biosci 12:319-26. 1996
  3. pmc Maternal-fetal and neonatal pharmacogenomics: a review of current literature
    Y J Blumenfeld
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Perinatol 30:571-9. 2010
  4. pmc Direct-to-consumer genetic testing: failure is not an option
    R B Altman
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Clin Pharmacol Ther 86:15-7. 2009
  5. pmc Commentaries on "Informatics and medicine: from molecules to populations"
    R B Altman
    Stanford University, Chair, Department of Bioengineering, Stanford, CA, USA
    Methods Inf Med 47:296-317. 2008
  6. ncbi request reprint Constrained global optimization for estimating molecular structure from atomic distances
    G A Williams
    Stanford Medical Informatics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305 5479, USA
    J Comput Biol 8:523-47. 2001
  7. pmc The interactions between clinical informatics and bioinformatics: a case study
    R B Altman
    Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5479, USA
    J Am Med Inform Assoc 7:439-43. 2000
  8. pmc Pattern recognition of genomic features with microarrays: site typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains
    S Raychaudhuri
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University, CA 94305 5479, USA
    Proc Int Conf Intell Syst Mol Biol 8:286-95. 2000
  9. ncbi request reprint RIBOWEB: linking structural computations to a knowledge base of published experimental data
    R O Chen
    Section on Medical Informatics, MSOB X 215 Stanford University, CA 94305 5479, USA
    Proc Int Conf Intell Syst Mol Biol 5:84-7. 1997
  10. ncbi request reprint Conserved features in the active site of nonhomologous serine proteases
    S C Bagley
    Section on Medical Informatics, Stanford University, CA 94305 5479, USA
    Fold Des 1:371-9. 1996

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications20

  1. ncbi request reprint Whole-genome expression analysis: challenges beyond clustering
    R B Altman
    Stanford Medical Informatics, 251 Campus Drive, MSOB X 215, Stanford, California 95305 5479, USA
    Curr Opin Struct Biol 11:340-7. 2001
    ..Finally, techniques are now emerging to reconstruct networks of genetic interactions in order to create integrated and systematic models of biological systems...
  2. ncbi request reprint Constraining volume by matching the moments of a distance distribution
    C C Chen
    Section on Medical Informatics, Stanford University, CA 94305 5479, USA
    Comput Appl Biosci 12:319-26. 1996
    ..Our results also demonstrate the flexibility of probabilistic representations of structural constraints, and the importance of including volume information to constrain structural computations-especially in the case of sparse data...
  3. pmc Maternal-fetal and neonatal pharmacogenomics: a review of current literature
    Y J Blumenfeld
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Perinatol 30:571-9. 2010
    ..Potential future directions, including alternative drug classification, improvements in drug efficacy and non-invasive pharmacogenomic testing, will also be explored...
  4. pmc Direct-to-consumer genetic testing: failure is not an option
    R B Altman
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Clin Pharmacol Ther 86:15-7. 2009
    ..Therefore, the key challenge is to set up social, educational, and technical means to support individuals who have access to their genome...
  5. pmc Commentaries on "Informatics and medicine: from molecules to populations"
    R B Altman
    Stanford University, Chair, Department of Bioengineering, Stanford, CA, USA
    Methods Inf Med 47:296-317. 2008
    ..To discuss interdisciplinary research and education in the context of informatics and medicine by commenting on the paper of Kuhn et al. "Informatics and Medicine: From Molecules to Populations"...
  6. ncbi request reprint Constrained global optimization for estimating molecular structure from atomic distances
    G A Williams
    Stanford Medical Informatics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305 5479, USA
    J Comput Biol 8:523-47. 2001
    ..We show that compared to other optimization approaches, our algorithm is able combine sparse input data with physical constraints in an efficient manner to yield structures with lower root mean squared deviation...
  7. pmc The interactions between clinical informatics and bioinformatics: a case study
    R B Altman
    Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5479, USA
    J Am Med Inform Assoc 7:439-43. 2000
    ..The author provides examples of technology transfer between clinical informatics and bioinformatics that illustrate how they complement each other...
  8. pmc Pattern recognition of genomic features with microarrays: site typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains
    S Raychaudhuri
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University, CA 94305 5479, USA
    Proc Int Conf Intell Syst Mol Biol 8:286-95. 2000
    ..The nonparametric approach outperforms all other methods tested in this study...
  9. ncbi request reprint RIBOWEB: linking structural computations to a knowledge base of published experimental data
    R O Chen
    Section on Medical Informatics, MSOB X 215 Stanford University, CA 94305 5479, USA
    Proc Int Conf Intell Syst Mol Biol 5:84-7. 1997
    ..coli. procedure. Our results suggest that sophisticated and integrated computational capabilities can be delivered to biologists using this simple three-component architecture...
  10. ncbi request reprint Conserved features in the active site of nonhomologous serine proteases
    S C Bagley
    Section on Medical Informatics, Stanford University, CA 94305 5479, USA
    Fold Des 1:371-9. 1996
    ..The method of analysis is general and can be applied easily to other active sites of interest...
  11. ncbi request reprint RNA secondary structure as a reusable interface to biological information resources
    R M Felciano
    Section on Medical Informatics, Stanford University, CA 94305 5479, USA
    Gene 190:GC59-70. 1997
    ..These demonstrations are available at: http://www-smi.stanford.edu/projects/helix/pubs/ gene-combis-96/..
  12. ncbi request reprint Standardized representations of the literature: combining diverse sources of ribosomal data
    R B Altman
    Stanford Section on Medical Informatics, SUMC, CA 94305 5479, USA
    Proc Int Conf Intell Syst Mol Biol 5:15-24. 1997
    ..There is a wide variation in these numbers over different articles and organisms, confirming that some articles report structural information specific to E. coli while others report information that is quite general...
  13. doi request reprint Pharmacogenomics: "noninferiority" is sufficient for initial implementation
    R B Altman
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Clin Pharmacol Ther 89:348-50. 2011
    ..In many cases, pharmacogenetic tests need only reach reasonable expectations of noninferiority (compared with current prescribing practices) to merit use...
  14. ncbi request reprint Missing value estimation methods for DNA microarrays
    O Troyanskaya
    Stanford Medical Informatics Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    Bioinformatics 17:520-5. 2001
    ..We report results of the comparative experiments and provide recommendations and tools for accurate estimation of missing microarray data under a variety of conditions...
  15. ncbi request reprint Basic microarray analysis: grouping and feature reduction
    S Raychaudhuri
    Stanford Medical Informatics, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, 251 Campus Drive, MSOB X-215, Stanford, CA 94305-5479, USA
    Trends Biotechnol 19:189-93. 2001
    ....
  16. pmc DNATwist: a Web-based tool for teaching middle and high school students about pharmacogenomics
    D S Berlin
    Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA
    Clin Pharmacol Ther 87:393-5. 2010
    ..In testing, students found the tool and topic understandable and engaging. The tool is being modified for use at the Tech Museum of Innovation in California...
  17. ncbi request reprint The education potential of the pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics knowledge base (PharmGKB)
    R P Owen
    Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Clin Pharmacol Ther 82:472-5. 2007
    ..Although PharmGKB is primarily directed toward catalyzing new research, it also has utility as a source of information for education about pharmacogenomics...
  18. ncbi request reprint An XML-based interchange format for genotype-phenotype data
    M Whirl-Carrillo
    Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 5444, USA
    Hum Mutat 29:212-9. 2008
    ..We have written syntactic and semantic validators to check documents using this format. The schema and code for validation is available to the community at http://www.pharmgkb.org/schema/index.html (last accessed: 8 October 2007)...
  19. ncbi request reprint The PharmGKB: integration, aggregation, and annotation of pharmacogenomic data and knowledge
    A E Hodge
    Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
    Clin Pharmacol Ther 81:21-4. 2007
    ..Their goal is to catalyze pharmacogenetic and pharmacogenomic research...
  20. pmc Diversity of gene expression in adenocarcinoma of the lung
    M E Garber
    Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98:13784-9. 2001
    ..Gene expression analysis thus promises to extend and refine standard pathologic analysis...