Douglas H Ubelaker

Summary

Affiliation: Smithsonian Institution
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi Application of Lamendin's adult dental aging technique to a diverse skeletal sample
    Debra A Prince
    Department of Anthropology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville 37996 0760, USA
    J Forensic Sci 47:107-16. 2002
  2. ncbi A test of the phenice method for the estimation of sex
    Douglas H Ubelaker
    Department of Anthropology, NMNH, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20560 0112, USA
    J Forensic Sci 47:19-24. 2002
  3. ncbi The use of SEM/EDS analysis to distinguish dental and osseus tissue from other materials
    Douglas H Ubelaker
    Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20560, USA
    J Forensic Sci 47:940-3. 2002
  4. ncbi Use of solid-phase double-antibody radioimmunoassay to identify species from small skeletal fragments
    Douglas H Ubelaker
    Department of Anthropology, Smithsonian Institution, NMNH, MRC 112, Washington, D C 20560 0112, USA
    J Forensic Sci 49:924-9. 2004
  5. doi Applications of physiological bases of ageing to forensic sciences. Estimation of age-at-death
    Sara C Zapico
    Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, MRC 112, Department of Anthropology, 10th and Constitution Ave, NW, P O Box 37012, Washington, DC 20013 7012, United States
    Ageing Res Rev 12:605-17. 2013
  6. doi Application of three dental methods of adult age estimation from intact single rooted teeth to a Peruvian sample
    Douglas H Ubelaker
    Department of Anthropology, Smithsonian Institution, NMNH, MRC 112, Washington, DC 20560 0112, USA
    J Forensic Sci 53:608-11. 2008
  7. doi Issues in the global applications of methodology in forensic anthropology
    Douglas H Ubelaker
    Department of Anthropology, Smithsonian Institution, NMNH, MRC 112, Washington DC 20560, USA
    J Forensic Sci 53:606-7. 2008
  8. ncbi Histologic examination of bone development in juvenile chimpanzees
    Dawn M Mulhern
    Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20560, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 122:127-33. 2003
  9. doi Skeletal indicators of pregnancy and parturition: a historical review
    Douglas H Ubelaker
    Department of Anthropology, Smithsonian Institution, NMNH, MRC 112, Washington, DC 20560 0112, USA
    J Forensic Sci 57:866-72. 2012
  10. doi Bone microstructure in juvenile chimpanzees
    Dawn M Mulhern
    Department of Anthropology, Fort Lewis College, Durango, CO 81301, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 140:368-75. 2009

Detail Information

Publications22

  1. ncbi Application of Lamendin's adult dental aging technique to a diverse skeletal sample
    Debra A Prince
    Department of Anthropology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville 37996 0760, USA
    J Forensic Sci 47:107-16. 2002
    ..8 and 10+/-2 sears from two independent observers. Forty teeth were randomly remeasured from the Terry Collection in order to assess an intra-observer error. From this retest, an intra-observer error of 6.5 years was detected...
  2. ncbi A test of the phenice method for the estimation of sex
    Douglas H Ubelaker
    Department of Anthropology, NMNH, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20560 0112, USA
    J Forensic Sci 47:19-24. 2002
    ....
  3. ncbi The use of SEM/EDS analysis to distinguish dental and osseus tissue from other materials
    Douglas H Ubelaker
    Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20560, USA
    J Forensic Sci 47:940-3. 2002
    ..Analysis enables bone and tooth to be successfully distinguished from other materials in most cases. Exceptions appear to be ivory, mineral apatite, and perhaps some types of corals...
  4. ncbi Use of solid-phase double-antibody radioimmunoassay to identify species from small skeletal fragments
    Douglas H Ubelaker
    Department of Anthropology, Smithsonian Institution, NMNH, MRC 112, Washington, D C 20560 0112, USA
    J Forensic Sci 49:924-9. 2004
    ..pRIA correctly distinguished the human from the nonhuman samples. Using 200 mg or less of each sample, species of the deer specimen was identified correctly, given the choices of cow, deer, dog, goat, and pig...
  5. doi Applications of physiological bases of ageing to forensic sciences. Estimation of age-at-death
    Sara C Zapico
    Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, MRC 112, Department of Anthropology, 10th and Constitution Ave, NW, P O Box 37012, Washington, DC 20013 7012, United States
    Ageing Res Rev 12:605-17. 2013
    ....
  6. doi Application of three dental methods of adult age estimation from intact single rooted teeth to a Peruvian sample
    Douglas H Ubelaker
    Department of Anthropology, Smithsonian Institution, NMNH, MRC 112, Washington, DC 20560 0112, USA
    J Forensic Sci 53:608-11. 2008
    ..A new regression equation, specifically for Peruvian samples, is provided...
  7. doi Issues in the global applications of methodology in forensic anthropology
    Douglas H Ubelaker
    Department of Anthropology, Smithsonian Institution, NMNH, MRC 112, Washington DC 20560, USA
    J Forensic Sci 53:606-7. 2008
    ..The effort illustrates how case applications and court testimony can stimulate research advances. The articles also serve as a model for the improvement of methodology available for global applications...
  8. ncbi Histologic examination of bone development in juvenile chimpanzees
    Dawn M Mulhern
    Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20560, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 122:127-33. 2003
    ..Results indicate that juvenile chimpanzees and humans exhibit similar age-related changes in histologic variables. However, age is not as strong a predictor of variation in microstructural variables in chimpanzees as it is in humans...
  9. doi Skeletal indicators of pregnancy and parturition: a historical review
    Douglas H Ubelaker
    Department of Anthropology, Smithsonian Institution, NMNH, MRC 112, Washington, DC 20560 0112, USA
    J Forensic Sci 57:866-72. 2012
    ..This literature review calls for the continued exploration of skeletal alterations for determining parity status in human skeletal remains...
  10. doi Bone microstructure in juvenile chimpanzees
    Dawn M Mulhern
    Department of Anthropology, Fort Lewis College, Durango, CO 81301, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 140:368-75. 2009
    ..Am J Phys Anthropol 99 1996 585-601) suggest that bone microstructure has been stable throughout human evolution...
  11. doi Utility of the frontonasal suture for estimating age at death in human skeletal remains
    Helen S Alesbury
    Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History, MRC 112, Smithsonian Institution, 10th and Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20560, USA
    J Forensic Sci 58:104-8. 2013
    ....
  12. doi The forensic evaluation of burned skeletal remains: a synthesis
    Douglas H Ubelaker
    Department of Anthropology, Smithsonian Institution, NMNH, MRC 112, Washington, DC 20560 0112, United States
    Forensic Sci Int 183:1-5. 2009
    ..The rapidly growing literature in this area of forensic science includes experimental research that elucidates the dynamics of the thermal impact on skeletal structure and morphology...
  13. doi Radiocarbon analysis of dental enamel and bone to evaluate date of birth and death: perspective from the southern hemisphere
    Douglas H Ubelaker
    Department of Anthropology, NMNH, MRC 112, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20560, United States
    Forensic Sci Int 208:103-7. 2011
    ..Age at death also represents an important factor...
  14. doi Can handedness be determined from skeletal remains? A chronological review of the literature
    Douglas H Ubelaker
    Department of Anthropology, Smithsonian Institution, NMNH, MRC 112, Washington, DC 20560 0112, USA
    J Forensic Sci 57:1421-6. 2012
    ..Review of the published scientific evidence clearly reveals that observations and measurements of the human skeleton cannot determine handedness with the degree of confidence needed for forensic applications...
  15. ncbi Analysis of artificial radiocarbon in different skeletal and dental tissue types to evaluate date of death
    Douglas H Ubelaker
    Department of Anthropology, Smithsonian Institution, NMNH, MRC 112, Washington, DC 20560 0112, USA
    J Forensic Sci 51:484-8. 2006
    ..Within the bone sample analyses, the values of the trabecular bone were higher than those of cortical bone and supported the known placement on the pre-1963 side of the bomb-curve...
  16. ncbi Test of the Lamendin aging method on two historic skeletal samples
    Mary S Megyesi
    Department of Anthropology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48910, USA
    Am J Phys Anthropol 131:363-7. 2006
    ..1992] J. Forensic Sci. 37: 1373-1379), and higher than in the test by Prince and Ubelaker ([2002] J. Forensic Sci. 47:107-116) of the Lamendin method on the Terry Collection...
  17. ncbi Comparison of four skeletal methods for the estimation of age at death on white and black adults
    Laurent Martrille
    Service de médecine légale, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Montpellier, France
    J Forensic Sci 52:302-7. 2007
    ..However, in order to maximize the potential of each method, in the final evaluation one should consider mainly the method or methods that have a higher accuracy for a particular age range...
  18. ncbi Identification of animal species by protein radioimmunoassay of bone fragments and bloodstained stone tools
    Jerold M Lowenstein
    Department of Nuclear Medicine, California Pacific Medical Center, 2333 Buchanan Street, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA
    Forensic Sci Int 159:182-8. 2006
    ..We conclude that the pRIA technique shows a high degree of accuracy in discriminating human from animal bone fragments and bloodstains and in identifying animal species...
  19. ncbi Craniometric variation in the Americas
    Ann H Ross
    C A Pound Human Identification Laboratory, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
    Hum Biol 74:807-18. 2002
    ..Biological distance is investigated using traditional craniometrics by computing size and shape variables according to Mosimann and colleagues. This study shows that there is much biological variation within the Americas...
  20. ncbi Population affinities of 19th Century Cuban crania: implications for identification criteria in South Florida Cuban Americans
    Ann H Ross
    Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Campus Box 8107, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 8107, USA
    J Forensic Sci 49:11-6. 2004
    ..These results provide us with a context in which to begin to understand the biological variation of Cuban Americans, which will enable the development of identification criteria specific for this U.S. hybrid Hispanic community...
  21. ncbi Interpretation of postmortem change in cadavers in Spain
    José L Prieto
    Laboratorio de Antropología y Odontología Forense Instituto Anatómico Forense, Madrid, 28040, Spain
    J Forensic Sci 49:918-23. 2004
    ..5 years buried. Phase 4 (complete skeletonization): about one year on the surface and three years buried. This paper also provide useful information on the impact of carrion insect activity, location, climate, seasonality, and predator...
  22. ncbi Evaluation of Purkait's triangle method for determining sexual dimorphism
    Robert P Brown
    U S Army Criminal Investigation Command, Fort Lewis, WA 98433, USA
    J Forensic Sci 52:553-6. 2007
    ..5% prediction accuracy, similar to 87% for the head diameter. Combining threshold values for a single variable from Purkait's method and the femoral head diameter raised the predictability to greater than 90% for both sexes...