Thomas G Chasteen

Summary

Affiliation: Sam Houston State University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Biomethylation of selenium and tellurium: microorganisms and plants
    Thomas G Chasteen
    Department of Chemistry, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, Texas 77341, USA
    Chem Rev 103:1-25. 2003
  2. ncbi request reprint Cytometric determination of novel organotellurium compound toxicity in a promyelocytic (HL-60) cell line
    Brian L Sailer
    Sam Houston State University, Department of Biological Sciences, Box 2116, SHSU, Huntsville, TX 77341 2116, USA
    Arch Toxicol 77:30-6. 2003
  3. ncbi request reprint Organotellurium compound toxicity in a promyelocytic cell line compared to non-tellurium-containing organic analog
    Brian L Sailer
    Department of Biological Sciences, Sam Houston State University, Box 2116, Huntsville, TX 77341 2116, USA
    Toxicol In Vitro 18:475-82. 2004
  4. doi request reprint Biological interactions of selenocyanate: bioprocessing, detection and toxicity
    Radhika Burra
    Department of Chemistry, and the Texas Research Institute for Environmental Studies, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX, USA
    Environ Technol 30:1327-35. 2009
  5. ncbi request reprint Identification of biogenic organotellurides in Escherichia coli K-12 headspace gases using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography
    Jerry W Swearingen
    Department of Chemistry, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 77340, USA
    Anal Biochem 331:106-14. 2004
  6. ncbi request reprint Capillary electrophoretic determination of selenocyanate and selenium and tellurium oxyanions in bacterial cultures
    Bala Krishna Pathem
    Department of Chemistry, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 77340, USA
    Anal Biochem 364:138-44. 2007
  7. doi request reprint Production of dimethyl triselenide and dimethyl diselenenyl sulfide in the headspace of metalloid-resistant Bacillus species grown in the presence of selenium oxyanions
    Radhika Burra
    Department of Chemistry and Texas Research Institute for Environmental Studies, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 77340, USA
    Anal Biochem 396:217-22. 2010
  8. ncbi request reprint Geobacillus stearothermophilus V ubiE gene product is involved in the evolution of dimethyl telluride in Escherichia coli K-12 cultures amended with potassium tellurate but not with potassium tellurite
    Manuel A Araya
    Laboratorio de Microbiologia Molecular, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 40, Correo 33, Santiago, Chile
    J Biol Inorg Chem 9:609-15. 2004
  9. pmc Cysteine metabolism-related genes and bacterial resistance to potassium tellurite
    Derie E Fuentes
    Departamento de Biologia, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 40, Correo 33, Santiago, Chile
    J Bacteriol 189:8953-60. 2007
  10. pmc Microbial methylation of metalloids: arsenic, antimony, and bismuth
    Ronald Bentley
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260, USA
    Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 66:250-71. 2002

Collaborators

  • Brian L Sailer
  • Ronald Bentley
  • Claudio C Vásquez
  • Radhika Burra
  • Manuel A Araya
  • Gonzalo A Pradenas
  • Jerry W Swearingen
  • Bala Krishna Pathem
  • Derie E Fuentes
  • Miguel E Castro
  • Claudia P Saavedra
  • Mary F Plishker
  • Rebecca A Montes
  • James D Fox
  • Jose M Perez
  • Eugenia L Fuentes
  • Sergio E Pichuantes

Detail Information

Publications10

  1. ncbi request reprint Biomethylation of selenium and tellurium: microorganisms and plants
    Thomas G Chasteen
    Department of Chemistry, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, Texas 77341, USA
    Chem Rev 103:1-25. 2003
  2. ncbi request reprint Cytometric determination of novel organotellurium compound toxicity in a promyelocytic (HL-60) cell line
    Brian L Sailer
    Sam Houston State University, Department of Biological Sciences, Box 2116, SHSU, Huntsville, TX 77341 2116, USA
    Arch Toxicol 77:30-6. 2003
    ..Apoptotic cells were evident as early as 2 h following treatment with 1x10(-6) M concentrations of the compounds. Based on these results, future care should be afforded these compounds in laboratory as well as industrial settings...
  3. ncbi request reprint Organotellurium compound toxicity in a promyelocytic cell line compared to non-tellurium-containing organic analog
    Brian L Sailer
    Department of Biological Sciences, Sam Houston State University, Box 2116, Huntsville, TX 77341 2116, USA
    Toxicol In Vitro 18:475-82. 2004
    ..Therefore the telluride moiety was apparently an important factor in the apoptotic effect...
  4. doi request reprint Biological interactions of selenocyanate: bioprocessing, detection and toxicity
    Radhika Burra
    Department of Chemistry, and the Texas Research Institute for Environmental Studies, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX, USA
    Environ Technol 30:1327-35. 2009
    ..Preconcentration factors of 3.9 were achieved using a mixed sodium hydroxide/methanol elution solvent and by adding NaCl to aqueous SeCN(-) before loading on the SPE cartridge...
  5. ncbi request reprint Identification of biogenic organotellurides in Escherichia coli K-12 headspace gases using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography
    Jerry W Swearingen
    Department of Chemistry, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 77340, USA
    Anal Biochem 331:106-14. 2004
    ..These compounds are methanetellurol and dimethyl tellurenyl sulfide. The significance of these findings with regard to the current knowledge about bacterial tellurite resistance is discussed...
  6. ncbi request reprint Capillary electrophoretic determination of selenocyanate and selenium and tellurium oxyanions in bacterial cultures
    Bala Krishna Pathem
    Department of Chemistry, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 77340, USA
    Anal Biochem 364:138-44. 2007
    ..The results show that this method is a useful means of following the biological processing of these analytes in bacterial cultures...
  7. doi request reprint Production of dimethyl triselenide and dimethyl diselenenyl sulfide in the headspace of metalloid-resistant Bacillus species grown in the presence of selenium oxyanions
    Radhika Burra
    Department of Chemistry and Texas Research Institute for Environmental Studies, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 77340, USA
    Anal Biochem 396:217-22. 2010
    ....
  8. ncbi request reprint Geobacillus stearothermophilus V ubiE gene product is involved in the evolution of dimethyl telluride in Escherichia coli K-12 cultures amended with potassium tellurate but not with potassium tellurite
    Manuel A Araya
    Laboratorio de Microbiologia Molecular, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 40, Correo 33, Santiago, Chile
    J Biol Inorg Chem 9:609-15. 2004
    ..These results may be indicative that the two Te oxyanions could be detoxified in the cell by different metabolic pathways...
  9. pmc Cysteine metabolism-related genes and bacterial resistance to potassium tellurite
    Derie E Fuentes
    Departamento de Biologia, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 40, Correo 33, Santiago, Chile
    J Bacteriol 189:8953-60. 2007
    ..Results showed that cell tolerance to tellurite correlates with the expression level of the cysteine metabolic genes and that these genes are up-regulated when tellurite is present in the growth medium...
  10. pmc Microbial methylation of metalloids: arsenic, antimony, and bismuth
    Ronald Bentley
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260, USA
    Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 66:250-71. 2002
    ..Microbial methylation plays important roles in the biogeochemical cycling of these metalloid elements and possibly in their detoxification. The wheel has come full circle, and public health considerations are again important...