Rachael Winfree

Summary

Affiliation: Rutgers University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Are ecosystem services stabilized by differences among species? A test using crop pollination
    Rachael Winfree
    Department of Entomology, Rutgers, The State University, 119 Blake Hall, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 276:229-37. 2009
  2. doi request reprint Pollinator-dependent crops: an increasingly risky business
    Rachael Winfree
    Department of Entomology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901, USA
    Curr Biol 18:R968-9. 2008
  3. ncbi request reprint A meta-analysis of bees' responses to anthropogenic disturbance
    Rachael Winfree
    Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, 137 Mulford Hall, Berkeley, California 94720 3114, USA
    Ecology 90:2068-76. 2009
  4. ncbi request reprint Biodiversity ensures plant-pollinator phenological synchrony against climate change
    Ignasi Bartomeus
    Department of Entomology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, 08901, USA Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE 75007, Uppsala, Sweden
    Ecol Lett 16:1331-8. 2013
  5. pmc Historical changes in northeastern US bee pollinators related to shared ecological traits
    Ignasi Bartomeus
    Department of Entomology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:4656-60. 2013
  6. ncbi request reprint Pollination and other ecosystem services produced by mobile organisms: a conceptual framework for the effects of land-use change
    Claire Kremen
    Department of Environmental Sciences, Policy and Management, University of California, 137 Mulford Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 3114, USA
    Ecol Lett 10:299-314. 2007
  7. doi request reprint Native bees buffer the negative impact of climate warming on honey bee pollination of watermelon crops
    Romina Rader
    Department of Entomology, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 93 Lipman Drive, New Brunswick, NJ, 08901, USA
    Glob Chang Biol 19:3103-10. 2013
  8. doi request reprint Response diversity to land use occurs but does not consistently stabilise ecosystem services provided by native pollinators
    Daniel P Cariveau
    Department of Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
    Ecol Lett 16:903-11. 2013
  9. pmc Climate-associated phenological advances in bee pollinators and bee-pollinated plants
    Ignasi Bartomeus
    Department of Entomology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:20645-9. 2011
  10. ncbi request reprint Species abundance, not diet breadth, drives the persistence of the most linked pollinators as plant-pollinator networks disassemble
    Rachael Winfree
    Department of Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901
    Am Nat 183:600-11. 2014

Detail Information

Publications12

  1. pmc Are ecosystem services stabilized by differences among species? A test using crop pollination
    Rachael Winfree
    Department of Entomology, Rutgers, The State University, 119 Blake Hall, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 276:229-37. 2009
    ....
  2. doi request reprint Pollinator-dependent crops: an increasingly risky business
    Rachael Winfree
    Department of Entomology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901, USA
    Curr Biol 18:R968-9. 2008
    ..Three-quarters of leading global food crops rely on animal pollination. With both managed and wild pollinators declining, is there reason for concern? Researchers are beginning to pin down the possible long-term risks...
  3. ncbi request reprint A meta-analysis of bees' responses to anthropogenic disturbance
    Rachael Winfree
    Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, 137 Mulford Hall, Berkeley, California 94720 3114, USA
    Ecology 90:2068-76. 2009
    ..Future pollinator declines seem likely given forecasts of increasing land-use change...
  4. ncbi request reprint Biodiversity ensures plant-pollinator phenological synchrony against climate change
    Ignasi Bartomeus
    Department of Entomology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, 08901, USA Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE 75007, Uppsala, Sweden
    Ecol Lett 16:1331-8. 2013
    ..A simulation model confirms that high biodiversity levels can ensure plant-pollinator phenological synchrony and thus pollination function...
  5. pmc Historical changes in northeastern US bee pollinators related to shared ecological traits
    Ignasi Bartomeus
    Department of Entomology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:4656-60. 2013
    ..These results should help target conservation efforts focused on maintaining native bee abundance and diversity and therefore the important ecosystems services that they provide...
  6. ncbi request reprint Pollination and other ecosystem services produced by mobile organisms: a conceptual framework for the effects of land-use change
    Claire Kremen
    Department of Environmental Sciences, Policy and Management, University of California, 137 Mulford Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 3114, USA
    Ecol Lett 10:299-314. 2007
    ..Developing conceptual models for MABES aids in identifying knowledge gaps, determining research priorities, and targeting interventions that can be applied in an adaptive management context...
  7. doi request reprint Native bees buffer the negative impact of climate warming on honey bee pollination of watermelon crops
    Romina Rader
    Department of Entomology, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 93 Lipman Drive, New Brunswick, NJ, 08901, USA
    Glob Chang Biol 19:3103-10. 2013
    ..More generally, our study provides an important example of how biodiversity can stabilize ecosystem services against environmental change. ..
  8. doi request reprint Response diversity to land use occurs but does not consistently stabilise ecosystem services provided by native pollinators
    Daniel P Cariveau
    Department of Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
    Ecol Lett 16:903-11. 2013
    ..Our results suggest that either response diversity is not the primary stabilising mechanism in our system, or that new measures of response diversity are needed that better capture the stabilising effects it provides...
  9. pmc Climate-associated phenological advances in bee pollinators and bee-pollinated plants
    Ignasi Bartomeus
    Department of Entomology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:20645-9. 2011
    ....
  10. ncbi request reprint Species abundance, not diet breadth, drives the persistence of the most linked pollinators as plant-pollinator networks disassemble
    Rachael Winfree
    Department of Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901
    Am Nat 183:600-11. 2014
    ..Furthermore, these highly linked species likely persist because they are also the most common species, not because they are dietary generalists...
  11. ncbi request reprint The conservation and restoration of wild bees
    Rachael Winfree
    Department of Entomology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1195:169-97. 2010
    ..More research is greatly needed in many areas of bee conservation, including basic population biology, bee restoration in nonagricultural contexts, and the identification of disturbance-sensitive bee species...
  12. ncbi request reprint Bee foraging ranges and their relationship to body size
    Sarah S Greenleaf
    Department of Plant Pathology, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    Oecologia 153:589-96. 2007
    ..The equations we present can be used to predict foraging distances for many bee species, based on a simple measurement of body size...