A M Surprenant

Summary

Affiliation: Purdue University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint The relation between discriminability and memory for vowels, consonants, and silent-center vowels
    A M Surprenant
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 1364, USA
    Mem Cognit 24:356-66. 1996
  2. ncbi request reprint The perception of speech gestures
    A M Surprenant
    Department of Psychological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 1364, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 104:518-29. 1998
  3. ncbi request reprint Familiarity and pronounceability of nouns and names
    A M Surprenant
    Department of Psychological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
    Behav Res Methods Instrum Comput 31:638-49. 1999
  4. ncbi request reprint Manipulations of irrelevant information: suffix effects with articulatory suppression and irrelevant speech
    A M Surprenant
    Department of Psychological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 1364, USA
    Q J Exp Psychol A 53:325-48. 2000
  5. ncbi request reprint Distinctiveness and serial position effects in tonal sequences
    A M Surprenant
    Department of Psychological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 1364, USA
    Percept Psychophys 63:737-45. 2001
  6. ncbi request reprint Individual differences in the processing of speech and nonspeech sounds by normal-hearing listeners
    A M Surprenant
    Department of Psychological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 110:2085-95. 2001
  7. ncbi request reprint Fill-in and infill errors in order memory
    Aimee M Surprenant
    Purdue University, Department of Psychological Sciences, 703 Third Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907 2004, USA
    Memory 13:267-73. 2005

Detail Information

Publications7

  1. ncbi request reprint The relation between discriminability and memory for vowels, consonants, and silent-center vowels
    A M Surprenant
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 1364, USA
    Mem Cognit 24:356-66. 1996
    ..These results are problematic for theories based on acoustic discriminability but can be explained parsimoniously by Nairne's (1990) feature model...
  2. ncbi request reprint The perception of speech gestures
    A M Surprenant
    Department of Psychological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 1364, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 104:518-29. 1998
    ....
  3. ncbi request reprint Familiarity and pronounceability of nouns and names
    A M Surprenant
    Department of Psychological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
    Behav Res Methods Instrum Comput 31:638-49. 1999
    ..The value of using frequency and the ratings of familiarity and pronounceability for predicting variations in actual pronunciations of words and names are discussed...
  4. ncbi request reprint Manipulations of irrelevant information: suffix effects with articulatory suppression and irrelevant speech
    A M Surprenant
    Department of Psychological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 1364, USA
    Q J Exp Psychol A 53:325-48. 2000
    ..Implications for working memory, precategorical acoustic store, the changing-state hypothesis, and the feature model are discussed...
  5. ncbi request reprint Distinctiveness and serial position effects in tonal sequences
    A M Surprenant
    Department of Psychological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 1364, USA
    Percept Psychophys 63:737-45. 2001
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint Individual differences in the processing of speech and nonspeech sounds by normal-hearing listeners
    A M Surprenant
    Department of Psychological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 110:2085-95. 2001
    ....
  7. ncbi request reprint Fill-in and infill errors in order memory
    Aimee M Surprenant
    Purdue University, Department of Psychological Sciences, 703 Third Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907 2004, USA
    Memory 13:267-73. 2005
    ..The overall ratio is approximately 2:1. We conclude that none of the currently existing models adequately accounts for fill-in and infill errors...