Zemer Gitai

Summary

Affiliation: Princeton University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc PSICIC: noise and asymmetry in bacterial division revealed by computational image analysis at sub-pixel resolution
    Jonathan M Guberman
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States of America
    PLoS Comput Biol 4:e1000233. 2008
  2. ncbi request reprint The new bacterial cell biology: moving parts and subcellular architecture
    Zemer Gitai
    Department of Developmental Biology, Beckman Center, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Cell 120:577-86. 2005
  3. ncbi request reprint The choreographed dynamics of bacterial chromosomes
    Zemer Gitai
    Department of Developmental Biology, Beckman Center, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Trends Microbiol 13:221-8. 2005
  4. ncbi request reprint Plasmid segregation: a new class of cytoskeletal proteins emerges
    Zemer Gitai
    Princeton University, Department of Molecular Biology, NJ 08544, USA
    Curr Biol 16:R133-6. 2006
  5. ncbi request reprint Diversification and specialization of the bacterial cytoskeleton
    Zemer Gitai
    Princeton University, Department of Molecular Biology, Washington Road, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
    Curr Opin Cell Biol 19:5-12. 2007
  6. pmc New fluorescence microscopy methods for microbiology: sharper, faster, and quantitative
    Zemer Gitai
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA
    Curr Opin Microbiol 12:341-6. 2009
  7. pmc The bacterial actin MreB rotates, and rotation depends on cell-wall assembly
    Sven van Teeffelen
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:15822-7. 2011
  8. pmc Imaging-based identification of a critical regulator of FtsZ protofilament curvature in Caulobacter
    Erin D Goley
    Department of Developmental Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Cell 39:975-87. 2010
  9. pmc Rod-like bacterial shape is maintained by feedback between cell curvature and cytoskeletal localization
    Tristan S Ursell
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 111:E1025-34. 2014
  10. pmc The metabolic enzyme CTP synthase forms cytoskeletal filaments
    Michael Ingerson-Mahar
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Lewis Thomas Labs, Washington Road, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
    Nat Cell Biol 12:739-46. 2010

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications38

  1. pmc PSICIC: noise and asymmetry in bacterial division revealed by computational image analysis at sub-pixel resolution
    Jonathan M Guberman
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States of America
    PLoS Comput Biol 4:e1000233. 2008
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint The new bacterial cell biology: moving parts and subcellular architecture
    Zemer Gitai
    Department of Developmental Biology, Beckman Center, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Cell 120:577-86. 2005
    ..The striking conceptual and molecular similarities between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell biology thus make bacteria powerful model systems for studying fundamental cellular questions...
  3. ncbi request reprint The choreographed dynamics of bacterial chromosomes
    Zemer Gitai
    Department of Developmental Biology, Beckman Center, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Trends Microbiol 13:221-8. 2005
    ..Here, we review bacterial chromosome dynamics and our understanding of the mechanisms that direct and coordinate them...
  4. ncbi request reprint Plasmid segregation: a new class of cytoskeletal proteins emerges
    Zemer Gitai
    Princeton University, Department of Molecular Biology, NJ 08544, USA
    Curr Biol 16:R133-6. 2006
    ..The discovery that a plasmid-partitioning ATPase forms astral cytoskeletal structures both unveils a new family of cytoskeletal proteins and suggests that cytoskeletal involvement is a universal feature of DNA segregation...
  5. ncbi request reprint Diversification and specialization of the bacterial cytoskeleton
    Zemer Gitai
    Princeton University, Department of Molecular Biology, Washington Road, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
    Curr Opin Cell Biol 19:5-12. 2007
    ..These themes of diversity, species-specificity and crosstalk are emerging as central properties of cytoskeletal biology...
  6. pmc New fluorescence microscopy methods for microbiology: sharper, faster, and quantitative
    Zemer Gitai
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA
    Curr Opin Microbiol 12:341-6. 2009
    ..These technical developments are ushering in a new era of using fluorescence microscopy to understand bacterial systems in a detailed, comprehensive, and quantitative manner...
  7. pmc The bacterial actin MreB rotates, and rotation depends on cell-wall assembly
    Sven van Teeffelen
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:15822-7. 2011
    ..These findings both broaden the view of cytoskeletal motors and deepen our understanding of the physical basis of bacterial morphogenesis...
  8. pmc Imaging-based identification of a critical regulator of FtsZ protofilament curvature in Caulobacter
    Erin D Goley
    Department of Developmental Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Mol Cell 39:975-87. 2010
    ..The degree of curvature induced by FzlA depended on the nucleotide bound to FtsZ. Induction of FtsZ curvature by FzlA carries implications for regulating FtsZ function by modulating its superstructure...
  9. pmc Rod-like bacterial shape is maintained by feedback between cell curvature and cytoskeletal localization
    Tristan S Ursell
    Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 111:E1025-34. 2014
    ..Our work shows that MreB orchestrates persistent, heterogeneous growth at the subcellular scale, enabling robust, uniform growth at the cellular scale without requiring global organization. ..
  10. pmc The metabolic enzyme CTP synthase forms cytoskeletal filaments
    Michael Ingerson-Mahar
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Lewis Thomas Labs, Washington Road, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
    Nat Cell Biol 12:739-46. 2010
    ..These results implicate CtpS as a novel bifunctional member of the bacterial cytoskeleton and suggest that localization and polymerization may be important properties of metabolic enzymes...
  11. pmc The small protein MbiA interacts with MreB and modulates cell shape in Caulobacter crescentus
    Anastasiya A Yakhnina
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Lewis Thomas Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
    Mol Microbiol 85:1090-104. 2012
    ....
  12. ncbi request reprint MreB actin-mediated segregation of a specific region of a bacterial chromosome
    Zemer Gitai
    Department of Developmental Biology, Beckman Center, School of Medicine, Stanford University, California 94305, USA
    Cell 120:329-41. 2005
    ..MreB selectively interacts, directly or indirectly, with origin-proximal regions of the chromosome, arguing that the origin-proximal region segregates via an MreB-dependent mechanism not used by the rest of the chromosome...
  13. pmc Quantitative genome-scale analysis of protein localization in an asymmetric bacterium
    John N Werner
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:7858-63. 2009
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint The putative Poc complex controls two distinct Pseudomonas aeruginosa polar motility mechanisms
    Kimberly N Cowles
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 08544, USA
    Mol Microbiol 90:923-38. 2013
    ....
  15. pmc A dynamically assembled cell wall synthesis machinery buffers cell growth
    Timothy K Lee
    Department of Bioengineering and Biophysics Program, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 111:4554-9. 2014
    ....
  16. pmc Caulobacter chromosome segregation is an ordered multistep process
    Conrad W Shebelut
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Lewis Thomas Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:14194-8. 2010
    ..We discuss how the multistep view of bacterial chromosome segregation can help to explain and reconcile outstanding puzzles and frame future investigation...
  17. pmc Bacterial cell division spirals into control
    Zemer Gitai
    Department of Developmental Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Beckman Center B351, Stanford, CA 94305 5427, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:7423-4. 2003
  18. pmc Dynamic polar sequestration of excess MurG may regulate enzymatic function
    Allison M Michaelis
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
    J Bacteriol 192:4597-605. 2010
    ..Together, our results imply that inactive MurG is dynamically sequestered at the cell poles and that prokaryotes can thus utilize subcellular localization as a mechanism for negatively regulating enzymatic activity...
  19. pmc A growing family: the expanding universe of the bacterial cytoskeleton
    Michael Ingerson-Mahar
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA
    FEMS Microbiol Rev 36:256-66. 2012
    ..Here, we summarize the recent explosion in the identification of new members of the bacterial cytoskeleton and describe a hypothesis for the evolution of the cytoskeleton from self-assembling enzymes...
  20. pmc Self-assembling enzymes and the origins of the cytoskeleton
    Rachael M Barry
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, United States
    Curr Opin Microbiol 14:704-11. 2011
    ..The behaviors of these enzymes suggest that some modern cytoskeletal proteins may have evolved from dual-role proteins with catalytic and structural functions...
  21. pmc The structure and function of bacterial actin homologs
    Joshua W Shaevitz
    Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544, USA
    Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol 2:a000364. 2010
    ..We also discuss the outstanding puzzles in the field and possible directions where this fast-developing area may progress in the future...
  22. pmc Single molecules of the bacterial actin MreB undergo directed treadmilling motion in Caulobacter crescentus
    So Yeon Kim
    Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:10929-34. 2006
    ..Thus, MreB, like actin, exhibits treadmilling behavior in vivo, and the long MreB structures that have been visualized in multiple bacterial species seem to represent bundles of short filaments that lack a uniform global polarity...
  23. pmc Growth conditions regulate the requirements for Caulobacter chromosome segregation
    Conrad W Shebelut
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Washington Rd, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
    J Bacteriol 191:1097-100. 2009
    ..Our results also implicate ParAB as important segregation determinants, suggesting that multiple distinct mechanisms can mediate Caulobacter chromosome segregation and that their relative contributions can be environmentally regulated...
  24. pmc Beyond the cytoskeleton: mesoscale assemblies and their function in spatial organization
    Maxwell Z Wilson
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, United States
    Curr Opin Microbiol 16:177-83. 2013
    ..We discuss general mechanisms for assembly and regulation. Finally, we discuss assemblies that are found to organize metabolism and what possible mechanisms may serve these metabolic enzyme complexes...
  25. pmc Diverse functions for six glycosyltransferases in Caulobacter crescentus cell wall assembly
    Anastasiya A Yakhnina
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Lewis Thomas Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey, USA
    J Bacteriol 195:4527-35. 2013
    ..We suggest that these enzymes have specialized roles and normally function in distinct subcomplexes but retain the ability to substitute for one another so as to ensure the robustness of the peptidoglycan synthesis process. ..
  26. pmc Image analysis in fluorescence microscopy: bacterial dynamics as a case study
    Sven van Teeffelen
    Princeton University, Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton, NJ, USA
    Bioessays 34:427-36. 2012
    ..Thus, image analysis is not only a toolkit to be applied to new images but also an integral part of the design and implementation of a microscopy experiment...
  27. pmc An actin-like gene can determine cell polarity in bacteria
    Zemer Gitai
    Department of Developmental Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:8643-8. 2004
    ..We propose that the molecular polarity inherent in an actin-like filament is translated into a mechanism for directing global cell polarity...
  28. doi request reprint High-throughput screening of bacterial protein localization
    John N Werner
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, USA
    Methods Enzymol 471:185-204. 2010
    ..The cloning, imaging, and image analysis techniques described here are applicable to any organism of interest...
  29. pmc Flow directs surface-attached bacteria to twitch upstream
    Yi Shen
    Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, USA
    Biophys J 103:146-51. 2012
    ..This directed upstream motility could be beneficial in environments where flow is present, allowing bacteria to colonize environments that cannot be reached by other surface-attached bacteria...
  30. pmc Two independent spiral structures control cell shape in Caulobacter
    Natalie A Dye
    Department of Biochemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:18608-13. 2005
    ....
  31. pmc Surface association and the MreB cytoskeleton regulate pilus production, localization and function in Pseudomonas aeruginosa
    Kimberly N Cowles
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
    Mol Microbiol 76:1411-26. 2010
    ..aeruginosa pili and demonstrate that protein localization may represent an important aspect of virulence factor regulation in bacterial pathogens...
  32. pmc BapE DNA endonuclease induces an apoptotic-like response to DNA damage in Caulobacter
    Julia Bos
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:18096-101. 2012
    ....
  33. pmc Cell shape and cell-wall organization in Gram-negative bacteria
    Kerwyn Casey Huang
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Washington Road, Princeton, NJ 08544 1014, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:19282-7. 2008
    ....
  34. pmc Large-scale filament formation inhibits the activity of CTP synthetase
    Rachael M Barry
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, United States
    elife 3:e03638. 2014
    ..DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03638.001. ..
  35. pmc The curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus enhances surface colonization in flow
    Alexandre Persat
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, USA
    Nat Commun 5:3824. 2014
    ..The benefit provided by curvature is eliminated at high flow intensity, raising the possibility that diversity in curvature adapts related species for life in different flow environments. ..
  36. ncbi request reprint Bacterial evolution: rewiring modules to get in shape
    Alexandre Persat
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Lewis Thomas Laboratory, Room 355, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
    Curr Biol 24:R522-4. 2014
    ..A recent study demonstrates that two Asticcacaulis species repurposed an ancestral regulatory protein to rewire the modules of stalk regulation, localization, and synthesis, thereby generating new shapes...
  37. pmc Location and architecture of the Caulobacter crescentus chemoreceptor array
    Ariane Briegel
    Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
    Mol Microbiol 69:30-41. 2008
    ..Based on this model for the arrangement of receptors, there are between one and two thousand receptors per array...