Susan T Fiske

Summary

Affiliation: Princeton University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Social psychology. Why ordinary people torture enemy prisoners
    Susan T Fiske
    Princeton University, Princeton NJ 08544 1010, USA
    Science 306:1482-3. 2004
  2. ncbi request reprint Mind the gap: in praise of informal sources of formal theory
    Susan T Fiske
    Department of Psychology, Princeton University, NJ 08544, USA
    Pers Soc Psychol Rev 8:132-7. 2004
  3. doi request reprint Envy up, scorn down: how comparison divides us
    Susan T Fiske
    Department of Psychology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA
    Am Psychol 65:698-706. 2010
  4. ncbi request reprint Varieties of (de) humanization: divided by competition and status
    Susan T Fiske
    Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA
    Nebr Symp Motiv 60:53-71. 2013
  5. pmc From dehumanization and objectification to rehumanization: neuroimaging studies on the building blocks of empathy
    Susan T Fiske
    Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1167:31-4. 2009
  6. ncbi request reprint A model of (often mixed) stereotype content: competence and warmth respectively follow from perceived status and competition
    Susan T Fiske
    Department of Psychology, Princeton University, New Jersey 08544 1010, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 82:878-902. 2002
  7. ncbi request reprint Universal dimensions of social cognition: warmth and competence
    Susan T Fiske
    Department of Psychology, Green Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA
    Trends Cogn Sci 11:77-83. 2007
  8. ncbi request reprint Dehumanizing the lowest of the low: neuroimaging responses to extreme out-groups
    Lasana T Harris
    Psychology Department, Green Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA
    Psychol Sci 17:847-53. 2006
  9. doi request reprint Us versus them: social identity shapes neural responses to intergroup competition and harm
    Mina Cikara
    Department of Psychology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA
    Psychol Sci 22:306-13. 2011
  10. pmc From agents to objects: sexist attitudes and neural responses to sexualized targets
    Mina Cikara
    Department of Psychology, Princeton University, NJ 08540, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 23:540-51. 2011

Detail Information

Publications26

  1. ncbi request reprint Social psychology. Why ordinary people torture enemy prisoners
    Susan T Fiske
    Princeton University, Princeton NJ 08544 1010, USA
    Science 306:1482-3. 2004
  2. ncbi request reprint Mind the gap: in praise of informal sources of formal theory
    Susan T Fiske
    Department of Psychology, Princeton University, NJ 08544, USA
    Pers Soc Psychol Rev 8:132-7. 2004
    ..Theories' sources can be intellectual, personal, group, or worldview. As long as the theory is stated logically, any source can be heuristic...
  3. doi request reprint Envy up, scorn down: how comparison divides us
    Susan T Fiske
    Department of Psychology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA
    Am Psychol 65:698-706. 2010
    ..Regarding envy up, other studies demonstrate that Schadenfreude (malicious joy) targets envied outgroups. However, counterstereotypic information, empathy, and outcome dependency can mitigate both scorn and envy...
  4. ncbi request reprint Varieties of (de) humanization: divided by competition and status
    Susan T Fiske
    Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA
    Nebr Symp Motiv 60:53-71. 2013
    ..The humanization of ingroup members, who are both liked and respected, reflects individuating processes in impression formation, not necessarily accurate but at least three-dimensionally human...
  5. pmc From dehumanization and objectification to rehumanization: neuroimaging studies on the building blocks of empathy
    Susan T Fiske
    Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1167:31-4. 2009
    ..Other groups may be instead envied and viewed as tools or automatons, that is, objectified. The patterns can reverse when perceivers must consider the other's preferences, that is, appreciate the other's mind...
  6. ncbi request reprint A model of (often mixed) stereotype content: competence and warmth respectively follow from perceived status and competition
    Susan T Fiske
    Department of Psychology, Princeton University, New Jersey 08544 1010, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 82:878-902. 2002
    ..Stereotypically, status predicted competence, and competition predicted low warmth...
  7. ncbi request reprint Universal dimensions of social cognition: warmth and competence
    Susan T Fiske
    Department of Psychology, Green Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA
    Trends Cogn Sci 11:77-83. 2007
    ..People classified as high on one dimension and low on the other elicit predictable, ambivalent affective and behavioral reactions. These universal dimensions explain both interpersonal and intergroup social cognition...
  8. ncbi request reprint Dehumanizing the lowest of the low: neuroimaging responses to extreme out-groups
    Lasana T Harris
    Psychology Department, Green Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA
    Psychol Sci 17:847-53. 2006
    ..No objects, though rated with the same emotions, activated the mPFC. This neural evidence supports the prediction that extreme out-groups may be perceived as less than human, or dehumanized...
  9. doi request reprint Us versus them: social identity shapes neural responses to intergroup competition and harm
    Mina Cikara
    Department of Psychology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA
    Psychol Sci 22:306-13. 2011
    ..Outcomes of social group competition can directly affect primary reward-processing neural systems, which has implications for intergroup harm...
  10. pmc From agents to objects: sexist attitudes and neural responses to sexualized targets
    Mina Cikara
    Department of Psychology, Princeton University, NJ 08540, USA
    J Cogn Neurosci 23:540-51. 2011
    ..The current studies demonstrate that appetitive social targets may elicit a similar response depending on perceivers' attitudes toward them...
  11. ncbi request reprint Toward socially inspired social neuroscience
    Alexander Todorov
    Psychology Department, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
    Brain Res 1079:76-85. 2006
    ..Among the implications for social neuroscience: Social cognition intrinsically evokes affect, so social cognitive affective neuroscience glues together a variety of fields in psychological and neurosciences...
  12. pmc Social groups that elicit disgust are differentially processed in mPFC
    Lasana T Harris
    Department of Psychology and Center for the Study of Brain, Mind, and Behavior, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
    Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci 2:45-51. 2007
    ..This evidence fits differentiated mPFC processing of extreme outgroups, which activate mPFC less than other groups, but suggests that individuation increases activation...
  13. pmc On the wrong side of the trolley track: neural correlates of relative social valuation
    Mina Cikara
    Department of Psychology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA
    Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci 5:404-13. 2010
    ..Moral decisions are not made in a vacuum; intergroup biases and stereotypes weigh heavily on neural systems implicated in moral decision making...
  14. ncbi request reprint Regions of the MPFC differentially tuned to social and nonsocial affective evaluation
    Lasana T Harris
    Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, USA
    Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci 7:309-16. 2007
    ..Affective evaluation may be a general function of the MPFC, with some regions being tuned to more specific domains of information (e.g., social) than are others...
  15. doi request reprint Stereotyping by omission: eliminate the negative, accentuate the positive
    Hilary B Bergsieker
    Department of Psychology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 102:1214-38. 2012
    ..Multiple assessment methods confirm this stereotyping-by-omission phenomenon (Study 5). Implications of negativity omission for innuendo and stereotype stagnation are discussed...
  16. ncbi request reprint Bad but bold: Ambivalent attitudes toward men predict gender inequality in 16 nations
    Peter Glick
    Department of Psychology, Lawrence University, Appleton, WI 54912 0599, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 86:713-28. 2004
    ..The authors argue that hostile as well as benevolent attitudes toward men reflect and support gender inequality by characterizing men as being designed for dominance...
  17. doi request reprint An inconvenienced youth? Ageism and its potential intergenerational roots
    Michael S North
    Department of Psychology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA
    Psychol Bull 138:982-97. 2012
    ..We conclude by suggesting future avenues for ageism research, emphasizing the importance of understanding forthcoming intergenerational dynamics for the benefit of the field and broader society...
  18. pmc Under the radar: how unexamined biases in decision-making processes in clinical interactions can contribute to health care disparities
    John F Dovidio
    Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA
    Am J Public Health 102:945-52. 2012
    ..Understanding how these processes may contribute to bias in health care can help guide interventions to address racial and ethnic disparities in health...
  19. pmc Journey to the edges: social structures and neural maps of inter-group processes
    Susan T Fiske
    Princeton University, New Jersey, USA
    Br J Soc Psychol 51:1-12. 2012
    ..Both social structural and neural analyses circle back to traditional social psychology as converging indicators of inter-group processes...
  20. ncbi request reprint Attributions on the brain: neuro-imaging dispositional inferences, beyond theory of mind
    Lasana T Harris
    Department of Psychology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 1010, USA
    Neuroimage 28:763-9. 2005
    ..Thus, activated areas converge with prior neuro-imaging data on theory of mind and social cognition, but more precisely isolate the exact nature of the inferences that activate these areas...
  21. ncbi request reprint Controlling racial prejudice: social-cognitive goals affect amygdala and stereotype activation
    Mary E Wheeler
    Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 1010, USA
    Psychol Sci 16:56-63. 2005
    ..Neither response to photos of the racial out-group was inevitable; instead, both responses depended on perceivers' current social-cognitive goal...
  22. doi request reprint Act your (old) age: prescriptive, ageist biases over succession, consumption, and identity
    Michael S North
    Department of Psychology, Princeton University, NJ 08540, USA
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 39:720-34. 2013
    ....
  23. ncbi request reprint Ambivalent responses
    Peter Glick
    Department of Psychology, Lawrence University, Appleton, WI 54912 0599, USA
    Am Psychol 57:444-6. 2002
  24. ncbi request reprint Stereotype content model explains prejudice for an envied outgroup: Scale of anti-Asian American Stereotypes
    Monica H Lin
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 31:34-47. 2005
    ..The SAAAS demonstrates mixed, envious anti-Asian American prejudice, contrasting with more-often-studied contemptuous racial prejudices (i.e., against Blacks)...
  25. ncbi request reprint Dissociating affective evaluation and social cognitive processes in the ventral medial prefrontal cortex
    Wouter van den Bos
    University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci 7:337-46. 2007
    ..These findings suggest that, within the vmPFC, the PACC subserves primarily an affective function, whereas in other regions social context can modulate affective responses...
  26. ncbi request reprint The BIAS map: behaviors from intergroup affect and stereotypes
    Amy J C Cuddy
    Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL60208, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 92:631-48. 2007
    ..Emotions predict behavioral tendencies more strongly than stereotypes do and usually mediate stereotype-to-behavioral-tendency links...