Kim Lewis

Summary

Affiliation: Northeastern University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi Persister cells, dormancy and infectious disease
    Kim Lewis
    Antimicrobial Discovery Center, Department of Biology, Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Nat Rev Microbiol 5:48-56. 2007
  2. pmc Regulation of the Escherichia coli HipBA toxin-antitoxin system by proteolysis
    Sonja Hansen
    Antimicrobial Discovery Center, Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e39185. 2012
  3. pmc Characterization and transcriptome analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis persisters
    Iris Keren
    Antimicrobial Discovery Center and Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    MBio 2:e00100-11. 2011
  4. pmc Ciprofloxacin causes persister formation by inducing the TisB toxin in Escherichia coli
    Tobias Dörr
    Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Antimicrobial Discovery Center, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 8:e1000317. 2010
  5. doi Platforms for antibiotic discovery
    Kim Lewis
    Department of Biology and Antimicrobial Discovery Center, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Nat Rev Drug Discov 12:371-87. 2013
  6. ncbi Multidrug tolerance of biofilms and persister cells
    K Lewis
    Antimicrobial Discovery Center, Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02459, USA
    Curr Top Microbiol Immunol 322:107-31. 2008
  7. doi Persister cells
    Kim Lewis
    Department of Biology and Antimicrobial Discovery Center, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Annu Rev Microbiol 64:357-72. 2010
  8. ncbi Persister cells and the riddle of biofilm survival
    K Lewis
    Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Biochemistry (Mosc) 70:267-74. 2005
  9. ncbi Surpassing nature: rational design of sterile-surface materials
    Kim Lewis
    Department of Biology, Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Trends Biotechnol 23:343-8. 2005
  10. doi Intact DNA in ancient permafrost
    Kim Lewis
    Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Trends Microbiol 16:92-4. 2008

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications59

  1. ncbi Persister cells, dormancy and infectious disease
    Kim Lewis
    Antimicrobial Discovery Center, Department of Biology, Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Nat Rev Microbiol 5:48-56. 2007
    ..The molecular mechanisms that underlie the formation of dormant persister cells are now being unravelled and are the focus of this Review...
  2. pmc Regulation of the Escherichia coli HipBA toxin-antitoxin system by proteolysis
    Sonja Hansen
    Antimicrobial Discovery Center, Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e39185. 2012
    ....
  3. pmc Characterization and transcriptome analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis persisters
    Iris Keren
    Antimicrobial Discovery Center and Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    MBio 2:e00100-11. 2011
    ..A comparison of the persister transcriptome with transcriptomes obtained for several in vitro dormancy models identified a small number of genes upregulated in all cases, which may represent a core dormancy response...
  4. pmc Ciprofloxacin causes persister formation by inducing the TisB toxin in Escherichia coli
    Tobias Dörr
    Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Antimicrobial Discovery Center, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 8:e1000317. 2010
    ..These results suggest that a DNA damage-induced toxin controls production of multidrug tolerant cells and thus provide a model of persister formation...
  5. doi Platforms for antibiotic discovery
    Kim Lewis
    Department of Biology and Antimicrobial Discovery Center, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Nat Rev Drug Discov 12:371-87. 2013
    ....
  6. ncbi Multidrug tolerance of biofilms and persister cells
    K Lewis
    Antimicrobial Discovery Center, Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02459, USA
    Curr Top Microbiol Immunol 322:107-31. 2008
    ..Other approaches to the problem include sterile-surface materials, prodrug antibiotics, and cyclical application of conventional antimicrobials...
  7. doi Persister cells
    Kim Lewis
    Department of Biology and Antimicrobial Discovery Center, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Annu Rev Microbiol 64:357-72. 2010
    ..Stress responses may act as general activators of persister formation. Proteins required for maintaining persisters may represent realistic targets for discovery of drugs capable of effectively treating chronic infections...
  8. ncbi Persister cells and the riddle of biofilm survival
    K Lewis
    Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Biochemistry (Mosc) 70:267-74. 2005
    ..Persisters are essentially altruistic cells that forfeit propagation in order to ensure survival of kin cells in the presence of lethal factors...
  9. ncbi Surpassing nature: rational design of sterile-surface materials
    Kim Lewis
    Department of Biology, Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Trends Biotechnol 23:343-8. 2005
    ..These sterile-surface materials kill both air- and waterborne pathogens and are not susceptible to existing resistance mechanisms...
  10. doi Intact DNA in ancient permafrost
    Kim Lewis
    Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Trends Microbiol 16:92-4. 2008
    ..The data presented in this work raise intriguing questions about the nature of bacteria in many of the ancient samples reported to date: are they spores, persisters, sessile vegetative cells or do they make up a slow-growing population?..
  11. ncbi Prospects for plant-derived antibacterials
    Kim Lewis
    Antimicrobial Discovery Center and Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Nat Biotechnol 24:1504-7. 2006
    ..Can weakly active phytochemicals be combined synergistically to produce new antibacterial treatments?..
  12. doi Uncultured microorganisms as a source of secondary metabolites
    Kim Lewis
    Antimicrobial Discovery Center and Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA
    J Antibiot (Tokyo) 63:468-76. 2010
    ..The new cultivation approaches allow for the exploitation of the secondary metabolite potential of the previously inaccessible microorganisms...
  13. pmc Specialized persister cells and the mechanism of multidrug tolerance in Escherichia coli
    Iris Keren
    Department of Biology, Northeastern University, 134 Mugar Hall, 360 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115
    J Bacteriol 186:8172-80. 2004
    ..The function of these specialized dormant cells is to ensure the survival of the population in the presence of lethal factors...
  14. ncbi Conjugating berberine to a multidrug efflux pump inhibitor creates an effective antimicrobial
    Anthony R Ball
    Department of Biology and Antimicrobial Discovery Center, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    ACS Chem Biol 1:594-600. 2006
    ..The hybrid molecule showed good efficacy in a Caenorhabditis elegans model of enterococcal infection, curing worms of the pathogen...
  15. pmc Persisters: a distinct physiological state of E. coli
    Devang Shah
    Department of Biology, Northeastern University, 134 Mugar Hall, 360 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    BMC Microbiol 6:53. 2006
    ..Recent progress in understanding persisters is encouraging, but the main obstacle in understanding their nature was our inability to isolate these elusive cells from a wild-type population since their discovery in 1944...
  16. doi Persister eradication: lessons from the world of natural products
    Iris Keren
    Antimicrobial Discovery Center and Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Methods Enzymol 517:387-406. 2012
    ..Finally, one of the best bactericidal agents is rifampin, an inhibitor of RNA polymerase, and we suggest that it "kills" by preventing persister resuscitation...
  17. pmc High-throughput screen for novel antimicrobials using a whole animal infection model
    Terence I Moy
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    ACS Chem Biol 4:527-33. 2009
    ..elegans animals but do not affect the growth of the pathogen in vitro, thus acting by a mechanism of action distinct from antibiotics currently in clinical use...
  18. pmc Role of oxidative stress in persister tolerance
    Yanxia Wu
    Antimicrobial Discovery Center, Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 56:4922-6. 2012
    ..These findings show that induction of a classical resistance mechanism, MDR efflux, by oxidative stress leads to an increase in multidrug-tolerant persister cells...
  19. ncbi Persister cells and tolerance to antimicrobials
    Iris Keren
    Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    FEMS Microbiol Lett 230:13-8. 2004
    ..This suggests that persisters are not at a particular stage in the cell cycle, neither are they defective cells nor cells created in response to antibiotics. Our data indicate that persisters are specialized survivor cells...
  20. pmc GlpD and PlsB participate in persister cell formation in Escherichia coli
    Amy L Spoering
    Northeastern University, Department of Biology, 405 Mugar Hall, 360 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    J Bacteriol 188:5136-44. 2006
    ....
  21. pmc Kinase activity of overexpressed HipA is required for growth arrest and multidrug tolerance in Escherichia coli
    Frederick F Correia
    Department of Biology, Northeastern University, 405 Mugar Hall, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    J Bacteriol 188:8360-7. 2006
    ..Taken together, these results suggest that the protein kinase activity of HipA is essential for persister formation...
  22. pmc Role of global regulators and nucleotide metabolism in antibiotic tolerance in Escherichia coli
    Sonja Hansen
    Antimicrobial Discovery Center and Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 52:2718-26. 2008
    ..Consistent with this scenario, the overexpression of both genes produced increased tolerance to ofloxacin...
  23. pmc Isolation and physiology of bacteria from contaminated subsurface sediments
    Annette Bollmann
    Northeastern University, Department of Biology, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 76:7413-9. 2010
    ....
  24. pmc Potentiation of azole antifungals by 2-adamantanamine
    Michael D LaFleur
    Arietis Corporation, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 57:3585-92. 2013
    ..018) compared to fluconazole alone when fungal lesions were evaluated. AC17 is a promising lead in the search for more effective antifungal therapeutics. ..
  25. doi Killing by bactericidal antibiotics does not depend on reactive oxygen species
    Iris Keren
    Antimicrobial Discovery Center, Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 021156, USA
    Science 339:1213-6. 2013
    ..There was essentially no difference in survival of bacteria treated with various antibiotics under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. This suggests that ROS do not play a role in killing of bacterial pathogens by antibiotics...
  26. pmc SOS response induces persistence to fluoroquinolones in Escherichia coli
    Tobias Dörr
    Antimicrobial Discovery Center, Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    PLoS Genet 5:e1000760. 2009
    ..This unique survival mechanism may be an important factor influencing the outcome of antibiotic therapy in vivo...
  27. pmc Siderophores from neighboring organisms promote the growth of uncultured bacteria
    Anthony D'Onofrio
    Antimicrobial Discovery Center and Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Chem Biol 17:254-64. 2010
    ....
  28. pmc A trap for in situ cultivation of filamentous actinobacteria
    Ekaterina Gavrish
    Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    J Microbiol Methods 72:257-62. 2008
    ..Importantly, the trap cultivation resulted in the isolation of unusual and rare actinomycetes...
  29. pmc Killing by ampicillin and ofloxacin induces overlapping changes in Escherichia coli transcription profile
    Niilo Kaldalu
    Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 48:890-6. 2004
    ..Among the repressed genes were those required for flagellar synthesis, energy metabolism, transport of small molecules, and protein synthesis...
  30. pmc Novel high-throughput screen against Candida albicans identifies antifungal potentiators and agents effective against biofilms
    Michael D LaFleur
    Antimicrobial Discovery Center and Department of Biology, Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02118, USA
    J Antimicrob Chemother 66:820-6. 2011
    ..The screen was performed against C. albicans biofilms grown in microtitre plates in order to target the most resilient forms of the pathogen...
  31. pmc Emergence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains producing high levels of persister cells in patients with cystic fibrosis
    Lawrence R Mulcahy
    Department of Biology and Antimicrobial Discovery Center, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    J Bacteriol 192:6191-9. 2010
    ..Persisters may play a similarly critical role in the recalcitrance of other chronic infections...
  32. pmc Patients with long-term oral carriage harbor high-persister mutants of Candida albicans
    Michael D LaFleur
    Antimicrobial Discovery Center and Department of Biology, Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Avenue, 134 Mugar Hall, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 54:39-44. 2010
    ..The drug tolerance of persisters may be a critical but overlooked component responsible for antimicrobial drug failure and relapsing infections...
  33. pmc Tolerance of Escherichia coli to fluoroquinolone antibiotics depends on specific components of the SOS response pathway
    Alyssa Theodore
    Antimicrobial Discovery Center, Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115
    Genetics 195:1265-76. 2013
    ..UvrD directly promotes all repair processes initiated by FQ-induced damage and prevents RecAF-dependent misrepair, making it one of the crucial SOS functions required for tolerance. ..
  34. ncbi Prokaryotic real-time gene expression profiling for toxicity assessment
    Annalisa Onnis-Hayden
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Environ Sci Technol 43:4574-81. 2009
    ..A mechanism-based evaluation of toxins based on real-time gene expression profiles promises, to be an efficient and informative method for toxicity assessment in environmental samples...
  35. pmc Candida albicans biofilms produce antifungal-tolerant persister cells
    Michael D LaFleur
    Department of Biology, Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Ave, 134 Mugar Hall, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 50:3839-46. 2006
    ..It remains to be seen whether attachment initiates dormancy that leads to the formation of fungal persisters. This study suggests that persisters may be largely responsible for the multidrug tolerance of fungal biofilms...
  36. pmc Short peptide induces an "uncultivable" microorganism to grow in vitro
    D Nichols
    Department of Biology, Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 74:4889-97. 2008
    ..Access to cultures of some of these species should be possible through identification of the signaling compounds necessary for growth, their addition to standard medium formulations, and eventual domestication...
  37. pmc A screen for and validation of prodrug antimicrobials
    Laura E Fleck
    Antimicrobial Discovery Center, Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 58:1410-9. 2014
    ..These results suggest that screening for overlooked prodrugs may present a viable platform for antimicrobial discovery. ..
  38. pmc Identification of novel antimicrobials using a live-animal infection model
    Terence I Moy
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:10414-9. 2006
    ..Our findings indicate that the whole-animal C. elegans screen identifies not only traditional antibiotics, but also compounds that target bacterial virulence or stimulate host defense...
  39. pmc Incubation of environmental samples in a diffusion chamber increases the diversity of recovered isolates
    Annette Bollmann
    Northeastern University, Department of Biology, 134 Mugar Life Science Building, 360 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 73:6386-90. 2007
    ..This suggests that continuous cultivation in diffusion chambers adapts some microorganisms for growth under otherwise prohibitive in vitro conditions...
  40. pmc Diarylacylhydrazones: Clostridium-selective antibacterials with activity against stationary-phase cells
    Chao Chen
    Antimicrobial Discovery Center, Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Bioorg Med Chem Lett 24:595-600. 2014
    ..difficile cells. Two diarylacylhydrazones were shown to be non-toxic towards human FaDu and Hep G2 cells indicating that further studies with the class are warranted towards new drugs for CDI. ..
  41. pmc Biofilms and planktonic cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa have similar resistance to killing by antimicrobials
    A L Spoering
    Department of Biology, Northeastern University, 405 Mugar, 360 Huntington Ave, Boston, MS 02115, USA
    J Bacteriol 183:6746-51. 2001
    ..We further suggest that tolerance to antibiotics in stationary-phase or biofilm cultures is largely dependent on the presence of persister cells...
  42. pmc Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms in Disease
    Lawrence R Mulcahy
    Antimicrobial Discovery Center, Department of Biology, Northeastern University, 306C Mugar Life Sciences, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA, 02115, USA
    Microb Ecol 68:1-12. 2014
    ..Here, we review recent studies of P. aeruginosa biofilms with a focus on how this unique mode of growth contributes to its ability to cause recalcitrant infections. ..
  43. pmc Lassomycin, a Ribosomally Synthesized Cyclic Peptide, Kills Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Targeting the ATP-Dependent Protease ClpC1P1P2
    Ekaterina Gavrish
    Antimicrobial Discovery Center, Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Chem Biol 21:509-18. 2014
    ..This mechanism, uncoupling ATPase from proteolytic activity, accounts for the bactericidal activity of lassomycin. ..
  44. doi Tackling antibiotic resistance
    Karen Bush
    Department of Biology, 1001 E Third Street, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Nat Rev Microbiol 9:894-6. 2011
    ..From these discussions there emerged a priority list of steps that need to be taken to resolve this global crisis...
  45. pmc Multidrug pump inhibitors uncover remarkable activity of plant antimicrobials
    George Tegos
    Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 46:3133-41. 2002
    ..These findings also suggest that plant antimicrobials might be developed into effective, broad-spectrum antibiotics in combination with inhibitors of MDRs...
  46. pmc Use of ichip for high-throughput in situ cultivation of "uncultivable" microbial species
    D Nichols
    134 Mugar Hall, Department of Biology, Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 76:2445-50. 2010
    ..The new method allows access to a large and diverse array of previously inaccessible microorganisms and is well suited for both fundamental and applied research...
  47. ncbi Isolating "uncultivable" microorganisms in pure culture in a simulated natural environment
    T Kaeberlein
    Biology Department, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Science 296:1127-9. 2002
    ..These isolates did not grow on artificial media alone but formed colonies in the presence of other microorganisms. This observation may help explain the nature of microbial uncultivability...
  48. ncbi Immobilized N-alkylated polyethylenimine avidly kills bacteria by rupturing cell membranes with no resistance developed
    Nebojsa M Milovic
    Department of Chemistry and Division of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    Biotechnol Bioeng 90:715-22. 2005
    ..Finally, the immobilized N-alkyl-PEI, while deadly to bacteria, is determined to be harmless to mammalian (monkey kidney) cells...
  49. ncbi Metabolites of the "smoke tree", Dalea spinosa, potentiate antibiotic activity against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus
    Gil Belofsky
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74101, USA
    J Nat Prod 69:261-4. 2006
    ..aureus overexpression and knockout isogenic efflux mutants for the NorA pump were done in order to assess whether the potentiating effects were associated with inhibition of this known pump mechanism...
  50. pmc Structure-activity relationships of 2-aryl-1H-indole inhibitors of the NorA efflux pump in Staphylococcus aureus
    Joseph I Ambrus
    School of Chemistry, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
    Bioorg Med Chem Lett 18:4294-7. 2008
    ..A promising new antibacterial lead compound against S. aureus (2-phenyl-1H-indol-5-yl)-methanol, was also found...
  51. ncbi Synthesis of functionalized 2-aryl-5-nitro-1H-indoles and their activity as bacterial NorA efflux pump inhibitors
    Siritron Samosorn
    Institute for Biomolecular Science, Department of Chemistry, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
    Bioorg Med Chem 14:857-65. 2006
    ..The compound [4-benzyloxy-2-(5-nitro-1H-2-yl)-phenyl]-methanol was the most potent pump inhibitor...
  52. ncbi Mechanism of bactericidal and fungicidal activities of textiles covalently modified with alkylated polyethylenimine
    Jian Lin
    Department of Chemistry and Division of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    Biotechnol Bioeng 83:168-72. 2003
    ..The bactericidal textiles prepared herein are lethal not only to pathogenic bacteria but to fungi as well...
  53. ncbi Phenolic metabolites of Dalea versicolor that enhance antibiotic activity against model pathogenic bacteria
    Gil Belofsky
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74101, USA
    J Nat Prod 67:481-4. 2004
    ..cereus. Compounds 4 and 7 were also found to potentiate the activity of berberine and of prescribed antibiotics, with 4 demonstrating a mode of action consistent with inhibition of the NorA MDR efflux pump in S. aureus...
  54. ncbi Polymer surfaces derivatized with poly(vinyl-N-hexylpyridinium) kill airborne and waterborne bacteria
    Joerg C Tiller
    Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge 02139, USA
    Biotechnol Bioeng 79:465-71. 2002
    ..Various commercial synthetic polymers derivatized in this manner become bactericidal-they kill up to 99% of deposited, from either an aerosol or an aqueous suspension, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria on contact...
  55. ncbi Bactericidal properties of flat surfaces and nanoparticles derivatized with alkylated polyethylenimines
    Jian Lin
    Department of Chemistry and Division of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    Biotechnol Prog 18:1082-6. 2002
    ..Systematic chemical modifications of the immobilized PEI conducted herein shed light on the relationship between the structure of the polymer and the antibacterial efficiency of the resultant coating...
  56. ncbi Two flavonols from Artemisa annua which potentiate the activity of berberine and norfloxacin against a resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus
    Frank R Stermitz
    Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA
    Planta Med 68:1140-1. 2002
    ..aureus multidrug resistance (MDR) pump. These same two flavonols were earlier reported to potentiate the activity of artemisinin against Plasmodium falciparum...
  57. ncbi Drastically lowering the titer of waterborne bacteriophage PRD1 by exposure to immobilized hydrophobic polycations
    Faina Gelman
    Department of Chemistry and Division of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Biotechnol Lett 26:1695-700. 2004
    ..The greatest loss of infectivity--up to a 4-log reduction in the titer--was observed with immobilized hydrophobic polyethylenimine-based and dendrimer-based polycations...
  58. ncbi Isoflavones as potentiators of antibacterial activity
    Cécile Morel
    Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 1872, USA
    J Agric Food Chem 51:5677-9. 2003
    ..Thus, L. argenteus contains a weak antibacterial and also MDR pump inhibitors, which increase its potency...
  59. ncbi Polyacylated neohesperidosides from Geranium caespitosum: bacterial multidrug resistance pump inhibitors
    Frank R Stermitz
    Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
    Bioorg Med Chem Lett 13:1915-8. 2003
    ..aureus, but potentiated activity of the antibiotics berberine, rhein, ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin. Cellular concentrations of berberine were greatly increased in the presence of active esters...

Research Grants28

  1. A synergy-based therapy against C. difficile
    Kim Lewis; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..We will develop an effective therapeutic against drug-resistant C. difficile by disabling the mechanism of resistance to berberine, a widely used antimicrobial from medicinal plants. ..
  2. SCREEN DEVELOPMENT FOR ANTIMICROBIAL PRODRUGS
    Kim Lewis; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..key personnel in alphabetical order, last name first; Name eRA Commons User Name Organization Role on Project Kim Lewis k.lewis@neu...
  3. Culturing Uncultivatable Gut Microorganisms
    Kim Lewis; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....
  4. A GENOMICS APPROACH TO DRUG TOLERANCE
    Kim Lewis; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ....
  5. Super-persistent cells and the paradox of untreatable infections
    Kim Lewis; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..Our findings are likely to change the way we view infectious diseases and will provide rational approaches for discovering drugs that completely eradicate the infection. ..
  6. NOVEL METHODS FOR DISCOVERY OF ANTI-MICROBIALS
    Kim Lewis; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..Determination of chemical structure will be performed by a combination of MS and NMR methods. ..
  7. The Nature of Bacterial Uncultivability
    Kim Lewis; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Unculturable bacteria are an enormous untapped source of potentially useful pharmaceutical compounds. Unculturable bacteria also make up most of the human oral and intestinal microflora. ..
  8. NATURAL SUBSTRATES AND INHIBITORS OF MICROBIAL MDR PUMPS
    Kim Lewis; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..MDR inhibitors will potentiate the action of conventional antibiotics, aiding eradication of multidrug resistant human pathogens. ..
  9. A GENOMICS APPROACH TO BIOFILMS
    Kim Lewis; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..These studies will form the basis for understanding biofilm infections and developing drugs that target persister proteins. ..
  10. A High-Throughput Screen for Specific Anti-M. tuberculosis Compounds
    Kim Lewis; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..We will also look for compounds that act specifically against the pathogen M. tuberculosis, which will avoid killing of the good bacteria of our gut flora. ..
  11. A GENOMICS APPROACH TO P. AERUGINOSA BIOFILMS
    Kim Lewis; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..This information will likely contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of resistance. Resistance genes identified in this project will serve as targets for drug discovery and development of effective anti-biofilm therapies. ..
  12. A GENOMICS APPROACH TO P. AERUGINOSA BIOFILMS
    Kim Lewis; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ..This information will likely contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of resistance. Resistance genes identified in this project will serve as targets for drug discovery and development of effective anti-biofilm therapies. ..
  13. A GENOMICS APPROACH TO DRUG TOLERANCE
    Kim Lewis; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..Persisters are largely responsible for many serious relapsing infections. Identifying genes responsible for persister formation will lead to targets for developing an anti-persister therapy. ..
  14. A GENOMICS APPROACH TO BIOFILMS
    Kim Lewis; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..These studies will form the basis for understanding biofilm infections and developing drugs that target persister proteins. ..
  15. A GENOMICS APPROACH TO BIOFILMS
    Kim Lewis; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..These studies will form the basis for understanding biofilm infections and developing drugs that target persister proteins. ..
  16. BIODEFENSE THERAPEUTICS FROM UNCULTURED MICROORGANISMS
    Kim Lewis; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..Determination of chemical structure will be performed by a combination of MS and NMR methods. ..
  17. A GENOMICS APPROACH TO P. AERUGINOSA BIOFILMS
    Kim Lewis; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..This information will likely contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of resistance. Resistance genes identified in this project will serve as targets for drug discovery and development of effective anti-biofilm therapies. ..
  18. Super-persistent cells and the paradox of untreatable infections
    Kim Lewis; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Our findings are likely to change the way we view infectious diseases and will provide rational approaches for discovering drugs that completely eradicate the infection. ..
  19. A GENOMICS APPROACH TO P. AERUGINOSA BIOFILMS
    Kim Lewis; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..This information will likely contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of resistance. Resistance genes identified in this project will serve as targets for drug discovery and development of effective anti-biofilm therapies. ..
  20. NATURAL SUBSTRATES AND INHIBITORS OF MICROBIAL MDR PUMPS
    Kim Lewis; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..MDR inhibitors will potentiate the action of conventional antibiotics, aiding eradication of multidrug resistant human pathogens. ..
  21. A GENOMICS APPROACH TO DRUG TOLERANCE
    Kim Lewis; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Persisters are largely responsible for many serious relapsing infections. Identifying genes responsible for persister formation will lead to targets for developing an anti-persister therapy. ..
  22. A GENOMICS APPROACH TO BIOFILMS
    Kim Lewis; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..These studies will form the basis for understanding biofilm infections and developing drugs that target persister proteins. ..
  23. NATURAL SUBSTRATES AND INHIBITORS OF MICROBIAL MDR PUMPS
    Kim Lewis; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..MDR inhibitors will potentiate the action of conventional antibiotics, aiding eradication of multidrug resistant human pathogens. ..
  24. SCREEN DEVELOPMENT FOR ANTIMICROBIAL PRODRUGS
    Kim Lewis; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ....
  25. A synergy-based therapy against C. difficile
    Kim Lewis; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..We will develop an effective therapeutic against drug-resistant C. difficile by disabling the mechanism of resistance to berberine, a widely used antimicrobial from medicinal plants. ..