Terry Harrison

Summary

Affiliation: New York University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Taxonomy and phylogenetic relationships of early Miocene catarrhines from Sihong, China
    T Harrison
    Department of Anthropology, New York University, New York, New York 10003, USA
    J Hum Evol 37:225-77. 1999
  2. ncbi request reprint On the systematic status of the late Neogene hominoids from Yunnan Province, China
    Terry Harrison
    Department of Anthropology, New York University, 25 Waverly Place, New York, New York 10003, USA
    J Hum Evol 43:207-27. 2002
  3. doi request reprint The anatomy and systematic position of the early Miocene proconsulid from Meswa Bridge, Kenya
    Terry Harrison
    Center for the Study of Human Origins, Department of Anthropology, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA
    J Hum Evol 56:479-96. 2009
  4. doi request reprint Skeletal correlates of quadrupedalism and climbing in the anthropoid forelimb: implications for inferring locomotion in Miocene catarrhines
    Thomas R Rein
    Center for the Study of Human Origins, Department of Anthropology, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA
    J Hum Evol 61:564-74. 2011
  5. doi request reprint Ecological implications of the relative rarity of fossil hominins at Laetoli
    Denise F Su
    Department of Anthropology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
    J Hum Evol 55:672-81. 2008
  6. ncbi request reprint A new middle Miocene pliopithecid from Sant Quirze, northern Spain
    Terry Harrison
    J Hum Evol 42:371-7. 2002
  7. ncbi request reprint A new middle Miocene pliopithecid from Inner Mongolia, China
    Zhaoqun Zhang
    J Hum Evol 54:444-7. 2008

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications7

  1. ncbi request reprint Taxonomy and phylogenetic relationships of early Miocene catarrhines from Sihong, China
    T Harrison
    Department of Anthropology, New York University, New York, New York 10003, USA
    J Hum Evol 37:225-77. 1999
    ..The earliest Eurasian catarrhines probably migrated into tropical Asia as part of a major faunal interchange with Africa that occurred during MN 3...
  2. ncbi request reprint On the systematic status of the late Neogene hominoids from Yunnan Province, China
    Terry Harrison
    Department of Anthropology, New York University, 25 Waverly Place, New York, New York 10003, USA
    J Hum Evol 43:207-27. 2002
    ..We speculate that changed climatic condition in the mid-Pliocene, and possibly the arrival of Homo soon after, may have precipitated the regional extinction of large hominoids in southern China and in mainland southeast Asia...
  3. doi request reprint The anatomy and systematic position of the early Miocene proconsulid from Meswa Bridge, Kenya
    Terry Harrison
    Center for the Study of Human Origins, Department of Anthropology, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA
    J Hum Evol 56:479-96. 2009
    ..The inference that it is a stem member of the Proconsul clade is consistent with the estimated age of the material...
  4. doi request reprint Skeletal correlates of quadrupedalism and climbing in the anthropoid forelimb: implications for inferring locomotion in Miocene catarrhines
    Thomas R Rein
    Center for the Study of Human Origins, Department of Anthropology, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA
    J Hum Evol 61:564-74. 2011
    ....
  5. doi request reprint Ecological implications of the relative rarity of fossil hominins at Laetoli
    Denise F Su
    Department of Anthropology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
    J Hum Evol 55:672-81. 2008
    ..Compared with Hadar, Laetoli probably represented a less optimal habitat for the foraging and dietary behavior of A. afarensis, and this is reflected in their inferred lower abundance, density, and biomass...
  6. ncbi request reprint A new middle Miocene pliopithecid from Sant Quirze, northern Spain
    Terry Harrison
    J Hum Evol 42:371-7. 2002
  7. ncbi request reprint A new middle Miocene pliopithecid from Inner Mongolia, China
    Zhaoqun Zhang
    J Hum Evol 54:444-7. 2008