R A Wise

Summary

Affiliation: National Institutes of Health
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Dual roles of dopamine in food and drug seeking: the drive-reward paradox
    Roy A Wise
    Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 73:819-26. 2013
  2. ncbi request reprint Dopamine, learning and motivation
    Roy A Wise
    Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Nat Rev Neurosci 5:483-94. 2004
  3. pmc Forebrain substrates of reward and motivation
    Roy A Wise
    Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA
    J Comp Neurol 493:115-21. 2005
  4. ncbi request reprint Brain reward circuitry: insights from unsensed incentives
    Roy A Wise
    Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Neuron 36:229-40. 2002
  5. pmc Ventral tegmental glutamate: a role in stress-, cue-, and cocaine-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking
    Roy A Wise
    Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes on Health, Department of Health and Human Services, 251 Bayview Blvd, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA
    Neuropharmacology 56:174-6. 2009
  6. pmc Dopamine and reward: the anhedonia hypothesis 30 years on
    Roy A Wise
    Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, USA
    Neurotox Res 14:169-83. 2008
  7. pmc Roles for nigrostriatal--not just mesocorticolimbic--dopamine in reward and addiction
    Roy A Wise
    Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, USA
    Trends Neurosci 32:517-24. 2009
  8. pmc Differentiating the rapid actions of cocaine
    Roy A Wise
    US National Institute on Drug Abuse, Behavioral Neuroscience Section, 251 Bayview Boulevard Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA
    Nat Rev Neurosci 12:479-84. 2011
  9. pmc Role of brain dopamine in food reward and reinforcement
    Roy A Wise
    Intramural Research Program, Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 361:1149-58. 2006
  10. pmc Cocaine serves as a peripheral interoceptive conditioned stimulus for central glutamate and dopamine release
    Roy A Wise
    Department of Health and Human Services, Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e2846. 2008

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications48

  1. pmc Dual roles of dopamine in food and drug seeking: the drive-reward paradox
    Roy A Wise
    Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    Biol Psychiatry 73:819-26. 2013
    ..That the same brain circuitry is implicated in the motivation for and the reinforcement by both food and addictive drugs extends the argument for a common mechanism underlying compulsive overeating and compulsive drug taking...
  2. ncbi request reprint Dopamine, learning and motivation
    Roy A Wise
    Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Nat Rev Neurosci 5:483-94. 2004
  3. pmc Forebrain substrates of reward and motivation
    Roy A Wise
    Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA
    J Comp Neurol 493:115-21. 2005
    ..This system is phasically activated by most drugs of abuse and such activation contributes to the habit-forming actions of these drugs...
  4. ncbi request reprint Brain reward circuitry: insights from unsensed incentives
    Roy A Wise
    Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Neuron 36:229-40. 2002
    ..Comparisons of natural and laboratory incentives suggest hypotheses as to why some habits become compulsive and give insights into the roles of reinforcement and of prediction of reinforcement in habit formation...
  5. pmc Ventral tegmental glutamate: a role in stress-, cue-, and cocaine-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking
    Roy A Wise
    Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes on Health, Department of Health and Human Services, 251 Bayview Blvd, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA
    Neuropharmacology 56:174-6. 2009
    ....
  6. pmc Dopamine and reward: the anhedonia hypothesis 30 years on
    Roy A Wise
    Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, USA
    Neurotox Res 14:169-83. 2008
    ..Properly understood, it is also fundamental to recent theories of incentive motivation...
  7. pmc Roles for nigrostriatal--not just mesocorticolimbic--dopamine in reward and addiction
    Roy A Wise
    Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, USA
    Trends Neurosci 32:517-24. 2009
    ..Thus, the similarities between nigrostriatal and mesolimbic dopamine systems can be as important as their differences...
  8. pmc Differentiating the rapid actions of cocaine
    Roy A Wise
    US National Institute on Drug Abuse, Behavioral Neuroscience Section, 251 Bayview Boulevard Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA
    Nat Rev Neurosci 12:479-84. 2011
    ..The conditioned activation of the dopamine system by cocaine-predictive cues offers a new target for potential addiction therapies...
  9. pmc Role of brain dopamine in food reward and reinforcement
    Roy A Wise
    Intramural Research Program, Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 361:1149-58. 2006
    ..While dopamine plays a central role in the feeding and food-seeking of normal animals, some food rewarded learning can be seen in genetically engineered dopamine-deficient mice...
  10. pmc Cocaine serves as a peripheral interoceptive conditioned stimulus for central glutamate and dopamine release
    Roy A Wise
    Department of Health and Human Services, Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 3:e2846. 2008
    ..These findings offer an explanation for short-latency behavioral responses and immediate dopamine elevations seen following cocaine injections in cocaine-experienced but not cocaine-naïve animals...
  11. ncbi request reprint Dopamine and glutamate release in the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area of rat following lateral hypothalamic self-stimulation
    Z B You
    Center for Studies in Behavioural Neurobiology, Department of Psychology, Concordia University, Montreal, QC, Canada
    Neuroscience 107:629-39. 2001
    ....
  12. ncbi request reprint Determinants of maximal inspiratory pressure. The Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging
    R I Harik-Khan
    Laboratory of Clinical Investigation, National Institute on Aging, Gerontology Research Center, Baltimore, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    Am J Respir Crit Care Med 158:1459-64. 1998
    ..028 x age + 0.343 x weight (kg) +/- (22.4); and for women: MIP +/- SEE = 171 - 0.694 x age + 0. 861 x weight (kg) - 0.743 x height (cm) +/- (18.5). These equations may be used for the assessment of inspiratory muscle strength...
  13. ncbi request reprint The effect of anthropometric and socioeconomic factors on the racial difference in lung function
    R I Harik-Khan
    Clinical Research Branch, National Institute on Aging, Gerontology Research Center, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA
    Am J Respir Crit Care Med 164:1647-54. 2001
    ..Although low socioeconomic indicators are related to lower lung function, they explain only a small proportion of this racial difference...
  14. ncbi request reprint The effect of gestational parity on FEV1 in a group of healthy volunteer women
    R Harik-Khan
    Laboratory of Clinical Investigation, National Institute on Aging, Intramural Research Program, Gerontology Research Center, Baltimore, MD 21224 6823, USA
    Respir Med 93:382-8. 1999
    ..Thus the nulliparous state is associated with lower FEV1 in this group of healthy adult women of child-bearing age...
  15. ncbi request reprint The effect of gender on the relationship between body fat distribution and lung function
    R I Harik-Khan
    Longitudinal Studies Section, Laboratory of Clinical Investigation, National Institute on Aging, Gerontology Research Center, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA
    J Clin Epidemiol 54:399-406. 2001
    ..383, P =.0005) compared to women (beta = -0.679, P =.02). Thus, body fat distribution has independent effects on lung function that are more prominent in men than women...
  16. ncbi request reprint Neuroadaptations of total levels of adenylate cyclase, protein kinase A, tyrosine hydroxylase, cdk5 and neurofilaments in the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area do not correlate with expression of sensitized or tolerant locomotor responses to co
    B T Hope
    National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health DHHS, 5500 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA
    J Neurochem 92:536-45. 2005
    ....
  17. ncbi request reprint Brain stimulation and morphine reward deficits in dopamine D2 receptor-deficient mice
    G I Elmer
    Department of Psychiatry, Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, University of Maryland, Maple and Locust Streets, Baltimore, MD 21228, USA
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 182:33-44. 2005
    ..Genetically engineered animal models provide a complementary approach to pharmacological investigations...
  18. ncbi request reprint Striatal hyperthermia associated with arousal: intracranial thermorecordings in behaving rats
    E A Kiyatkin
    Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse Intramural Research Program, 5500 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA
    Brain Res 918:141-52. 2001
    ..Because most neural processes are temperature-dependent, change in local temperature may result in dramatic modulation of the efficiency of neural processes in situations critical for life-support and during adaptive behavior...
  19. ncbi request reprint Quality assessment through patient self-report of symptoms prefiberoptic and postfiberoptic bronchoscopy
    G B Diette
    Department of Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
    Chest 114:1446-53. 1998
    ....
  20. ncbi request reprint Changing smoking patterns and mortality from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
    R A Wise
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21212, USA
    Prev Med 26:418-21. 1997
    ..Recent studies indicate that early identification of individuals with airflow obstruction and smoking intervention can halt the progression of COPD, but widespread screening and intervention programs have not yet been established...
  21. doi request reprint Leptin receptor polymorphisms and lung function decline in COPD
    N N Hansel
    Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA
    Eur Respir J 34:103-10. 2009
    ..We identified genetic variants in the LEPR gene significantly associated with lung function decline in a population of smokers with COPD. Our results support a role for LEPR as a novel candidate gene for COPD...
  22. ncbi request reprint Dopamine and food reward: back to the elements
    Roy A Wise
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 286:R13. 2004
  23. ncbi request reprint Rewarding effects of the cholinergic agents carbachol and neostigmine in the posterior ventral tegmental area
    Satoshi Ikemoto
    Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA
    J Neurosci 22:9895-904. 2002
    ..These findings implicate both nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic neurotransmission in ventral tegmental reward function and suggest special involvement of the posterior portion of the VTA in cholinergic reward function...
  24. ncbi request reprint The parsing of food reward
    Roy A Wise
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 291:R1234-5. 2006
  25. pmc Long-term upregulation of protein kinase A and adenylate cyclase levels in human smokers
    Bruce T Hope
    Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program National Institute on Drug Abuse National Institutes of Health Department of Health and Human Services, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA
    J Neurosci 27:1964-72. 2007
    ....
  26. ncbi request reprint Stress-induced relapse to cocaine seeking: roles for the CRF(2) receptor and CRF-binding protein in the ventral tegmental area of the rat
    Bin Wang
    Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program IRP, National Institute on Drug Abuse NIDA, National Institutes of Health, 5500 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 193:283-94. 2007
    ..The effects of selective CRF antagonists have not yet been reported...
  27. ncbi request reprint A role for conditioned ventral tegmental glutamate release in cocaine seeking
    Zhi Bing You
    Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA
    J Neurosci 27:10546-55. 2007
    ..The findings implicate glutamate as at least one of the sources of VTA signals from reward-associated environmental stimuli...
  28. ncbi request reprint Rewarding and psychomotor stimulant effects of endomorphin-1: anteroposterior differences within the ventral tegmental area and lack of effect in nucleus accumbens
    Abraham Zangen
    National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA
    J Neurosci 22:7225-33. 2002
    ..The present findings implicate the posterior VTA as a highly specific and sensitive site for opioid reward and suggest a role for EM-1-containing projections to the posterior VTA in the rewarding effects of other reinforcers...
  29. ncbi request reprint Rewarding effects of AMPA administration into the supramammillary or posterior hypothalamic nuclei but not the ventral tegmental area
    Satoshi Ikemoto
    Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA
    J Neurosci 24:5758-65. 2004
    ..These findings implicate posterior hypothalamic regions in reward function and suggest that reward mechanisms localized around the ventral tegmental area are more complex than has been assumed recently...
  30. pmc Acetylcholine release in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system during cocaine seeking: conditioned and unconditioned contributions to reward and motivation
    Zhi Bing You
    Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA
    J Neurosci 28:9021-9. 2008
    ....
  31. ncbi request reprint Brain temperature fluctuation: a reflection of functional neural activation
    Eugene A Kiyatkin
    Behavioural Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, 5500 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA
    Eur J Neurosci 16:164-8. 2002
    ..Thus, the local metabolic consequences of widely correlated neural activity appear to be the primary source of increases in brain temperature and a driving force behind the associated changes in body temperature...
  32. ncbi request reprint Failure of intravenous morphine to serve as an effective instrumental reinforcer in dopamine D2 receptor knock-out mice
    Greg I Elmer
    Neuroscience Program, Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21228, USA
    J Neurosci 22:RC224. 2002
    ..Under this range of doses and response requirements, the rewarding effects of morphine appear to depend critically on an intact D2 receptor system...
  33. ncbi request reprint Brain and body hyperthermia associated with heroin self-administration in rats
    Eugene A Kiyatkin
    Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse Intramural Research Program, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA
    J Neurosci 22:1072-80. 2002
    ....
  34. ncbi request reprint Heteromeric nicotinic acetylcholine-dopamine autoreceptor complexes modulate striatal dopamine release
    Davide Quarta
    Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse, IRP, NIH, DHHS, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA
    Neuropsychopharmacology 32:35-42. 2007
    ..These results reveal that striatal non-alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors form part of heteromeric dopamine autoreceptor complexes that modulate dopamine release...
  35. ncbi request reprint Two brain sites for cannabinoid reward
    Abraham Zangen
    National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA
    J Neurosci 26:4901-7. 2006
    ..These findings link the sites of rewarding action of Delta9THC to brain regions where such drugs as amphetamines, cocaine, heroin, and nicotine are also thought to have their sites of rewarding action...
  36. ncbi request reprint Blockade of substantia nigra dopamine D1 receptors reduces intravenous cocaine reward in rats
    Matthew G Quinlan
    Department of Psychology, Queens College, CUNY, 65 30 Kissena Boulevard, Flushing, NY 11367, USA
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 175:53-9. 2004
    ....
  37. ncbi request reprint Brain hyperthermia is induced by methamphetamine and exacerbated by social interaction
    P Leon Brown
    Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Intramural Research Program, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA
    J Neurosci 23:3924-9. 2003
    ....
  38. ncbi request reprint Drive, incentive, and reinforcement: the antecedents and consequences of motivation
    Roy A Wise
    Nebr Symp Motiv 50:159-95. 2004
  39. ncbi request reprint Unmet expectations: the brain minds
    William A Carlezon
    Nat Med 9:15-6. 2003
  40. ncbi request reprint Mapping of chemical trigger zones for reward
    Satoshi Ikemoto
    Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse NIDA, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, 5500 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA
    Neuropharmacology 47:190-201. 2004
    ..This approach has identified GABAergic, dopaminergic, glutamatergic, and cholinergic trigger zones within meso-corticolimbic circuitry important for natural reward function...
  41. ncbi request reprint Elevated expression of 5-HT1B receptors in nucleus accumbens efferents sensitizes animals to cocaine
    John F Neumaier
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    J Neurosci 22:10856-63. 2002
    ....
  42. ncbi request reprint Study of the interaction of chlorisondamine and chlorisondamine analogues with an epitope of the alpha-2 neuronal acetylcholine nicotinic receptor subunit
    Hay Yan J Wang
    Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, NIDA IRP, National Institutes of Health, DHHS, 5500 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore Maryland 21224, USA
    J Proteome Res 4:532-9. 2005
    ..Overall, all three analogues showed better affinity than CHL for complex formation with both the nonphosphorylated and phosphorylated epitopes...
  43. ncbi request reprint How can drug addiction help us understand obesity?
    Nora D Volkow
    National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Nat Neurosci 8:555-60. 2005
  44. ncbi request reprint Cocaine experience establishes control of midbrain glutamate and dopamine by corticotropin-releasing factor: a role in stress-induced relapse to drug seeking
    Bin Wang
    Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA
    J Neurosci 25:5389-96. 2005
    ..Similar neuroadaptations may be important for the comorbidity between addiction and other stress-related psychiatric disorders...
  45. ncbi request reprint Interaction of chlorisondamine with the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor
    Amina S Woods
    The National Institute on Drug Abuse, Intramural Research Program, National Institutes of Health, 5500 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA
    J Proteome Res 2:207-12. 2003
    ....
  46. ncbi request reprint Endomorphin-1 and -2 immunoreactive cells in the hypothalamus are labeled by fluoro-gold injections to the ventral tegmental area
    Thomas N Greenwell
    Neuroscience Program, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana 70112, USA
    J Comp Neurol 454:320-8. 2002
    ..The results support the idea that some endomorphin-containing neurons in the hypothalamus project to the VTA, where they may modulate reward and locomotor circuitry...
  47. ncbi request reprint A new peptide input to learning and addiction
    Roy A Wise
    Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, 5500 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA
    Neuron 49:483-4. 2006
    ..This parallels a similar effect of corticotropin-releasing factor and suggests a form of neuroadaptation that increases the likelihood of addiction relapse...
  48. ncbi request reprint Dopamine uptake through the norepinephrine transporter in brain regions with low levels of the dopamine transporter: evidence from knock-out mouse lines
    Jose A Morón
    Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA
    J Neurosci 22:389-95. 2002
    ..These data underscore the fact that which transporter clears dopamine from a given region depends on both the affinities and the local densities of the transporters...