T Misteli

Summary

Affiliation: National Institutes of Health
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Lamin A-dependent nuclear defects in human aging
    Paola Scaffidi
    National Cancer Institute NCI, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Science 312:1059-63. 2006
  2. pmc Tumor formation via loss of a molecular motor protein
    Manjari Mazumdar
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Curr Biol 16:1559-64. 2006
  3. ncbi request reprint Beyond the sequence: cellular organization of genome function
    Tom Misteli
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Cell 128:787-800. 2007
  4. pmc Positional stability of single double-strand breaks in mammalian cells
    Evi Soutoglou
    National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Nat Cell Biol 9:675-82. 2007
  5. pmc The meaning of gene positioning
    Takumi Takizawa
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Cell 135:9-13. 2008
  6. pmc Locus-specific and activity-independent gene repositioning during early tumorigenesis
    Karen J Meaburn
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    J Cell Biol 180:39-50. 2008
  7. pmc Ageing-related chromatin defects through loss of the NURD complex
    Gianluca Pegoraro
    National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Nat Cell Biol 11:1261-7. 2009
  8. pmc Disease-specific gene repositioning in breast cancer
    Karen J Meaburn
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    J Cell Biol 187:801-12. 2009
  9. pmc The central role of chromatin maintenance in aging
    Gianluca Pegoraro
    National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Aging (Albany NY) 1:1017-22. 2009
  10. pmc Lamin A/C-mediated neuromuscular junction defects in Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy
    Alexandre Mejat
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    J Cell Biol 184:31-44. 2009

Detail Information

Publications96

  1. pmc Lamin A-dependent nuclear defects in human aging
    Paola Scaffidi
    National Cancer Institute NCI, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Science 312:1059-63. 2006
    ..Inhibition of this splice site reverses the nuclear defects associated with aging. These observations implicate lamin A in physiological aging...
  2. pmc Tumor formation via loss of a molecular motor protein
    Manjari Mazumdar
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Curr Biol 16:1559-64. 2006
    ..Our results support the notion that loss of a molecular motor leads to tumor formation and that aneuploidy can act as a primary trigger of tumorigenesis...
  3. ncbi request reprint Beyond the sequence: cellular organization of genome function
    Tom Misteli
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Cell 128:787-800. 2007
    ..Recent insights into the cell biology of genomes have overturned long-held dogmas and have led to new models for many essential cellular processes, including gene expression and genome stability...
  4. pmc Positional stability of single double-strand breaks in mammalian cells
    Evi Soutoglou
    National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Nat Cell Biol 9:675-82. 2007
    ..These results support a contact-first model in which chromosome translocations predominantly form among spatially proximal DSBs...
  5. pmc The meaning of gene positioning
    Takumi Takizawa
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Cell 135:9-13. 2008
    ....
  6. pmc Locus-specific and activity-independent gene repositioning during early tumorigenesis
    Karen J Meaburn
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    J Cell Biol 180:39-50. 2008
    ..Our results demonstrate the existence of activity-independent genome repositioning events in the early stages of tumor formation...
  7. pmc Ageing-related chromatin defects through loss of the NURD complex
    Gianluca Pegoraro
    National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Nat Cell Biol 11:1261-7. 2009
    ..These results outline a molecular mechanism for chromatin defects during ageing...
  8. pmc Disease-specific gene repositioning in breast cancer
    Karen J Meaburn
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    J Cell Biol 187:801-12. 2009
    ..Our data indicate that cancer cells have disease-specific gene distributions. These interphase gene positioning patterns may be used to identify cancer tissues...
  9. pmc The central role of chromatin maintenance in aging
    Gianluca Pegoraro
    National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Aging (Albany NY) 1:1017-22. 2009
    ..Here we discuss these findings and we propose a broad framework for the role of chromatin in aging to reconcile apparently contradicting evidence obtained in various experimental systems...
  10. pmc Lamin A/C-mediated neuromuscular junction defects in Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy
    Alexandre Mejat
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    J Cell Biol 184:31-44. 2009
    ..These results suggest that lamin A/C-mediated NMJ defects contribute to the AD-EDMD disease phenotype and provide insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms for the muscle-specific phenotype of AD-EDMD...
  11. pmc Identification of mammalian protein quality control factors by high-throughput cellular imaging
    Gianluca Pegoraro
    Cell Biology of Genomes, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e31684. 2012
    ....
  12. pmc Mapping of lamin A- and progerin-interacting genome regions
    Nard Kubben
    Genome Cell Biology Group, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Chromosoma 121:447-64. 2012
    ..These observations demonstrate disease-related changes in higher order genome organization in HGPS and provide novel insights into the role of lamin-chromatin interactions in chromatin organization...
  13. pmc Ranked retrieval of segmented nuclei for objective assessment of cancer gene repositioning
    William J Cukierski
    Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA
    BMC Bioinformatics 13:232. 2012
    ..Although the tissue samples in this study contain a surplus of available nuclei, automatic identification of the well-segmented subset remains a challenging task...
  14. doi request reprint The cell biology of genomes: bringing the double helix to life
    Tom Misteli
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Cell 152:1209-12. 2013
    ..Integration of sequence information with molecular and cellular features of the genome promises a fuller understanding of genome function...
  15. pmc The lamin protein family
    Travis A Dittmer
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20896, USA
    Genome Biol 12:222. 2011
    ..Mutations in lamins cause a large number of diverse human diseases, collectively known as the laminopathies, underscoring their functional importance...
  16. pmc The cell nucleus and aging: tantalizing clues and hopeful promises
    Paola Scaffidi
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 3:e395. 2005
  17. pmc Differential recruitment of pre-mRNA splicing factors to alternatively spliced transcripts in vivo
    Stephen A Mabon
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 3:e374. 2005
    ..They confirm a key prediction of a stochastic model of alternative splicing, in which distinct combinatorial sets of generic pre-mRNA splicing factors contribute to splicing outcome...
  18. pmc Tissue-specific spatial organization of genomes
    Luis A Parada
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892
    Genome Biol 5:R44. 2004
    ..It is unclear whether the nonrandom spatial arrangement of chromosomes is conserved among tissues or whether spatial genome organization is tissue-specific...
  19. pmc A non-random walk through the genome
    Brian Oliver
    National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Genome Biol 6:214. 2005
    ..It seems probable that this organization is related to chromatin and the structure of the nucleus...
  20. pmc The emerging role of nuclear architecture in DNA repair and genome maintenance
    Tom Misteli
    National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 10:243-54. 2009
    ..These cell-biological features of DNA repair illustrate an emerging role for nuclear architecture in multiple aspects of genome maintenance...
  21. ncbi request reprint RNA polymerase II targets pre-mRNA splicing factors to transcription sites in vivo
    T Misteli
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Mol Cell 3:697-705. 1999
    ..Our results demonstrate a critical role for the CTD of RNA pol II LS in the intranuclear targeting of splicing factors to transcription sites in vivo...
  22. ncbi request reprint Spatial positioning; a new dimension in genome function
    Tom Misteli
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA
    Cell 119:153-6. 2004
    ..Recent observations have highlighted the important yet still largely mysterious role of spatial positioning in genome activity and stability...
  23. ncbi request reprint Cell biology of transcription and pre-mRNA splicing: nuclear architecture meets nuclear function
    T Misteli
    National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    J Cell Sci 113:1841-9. 2000
    ..The cellular organization of transcription and splicing suggest that the morphology of nuclear compartments is largely determined by the activities of the nucleus...
  24. pmc Going in GTP cycles in the nucleolus
    Tom Misteli
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    J Cell Biol 168:177-8. 2005
    ..The uncovered mechanism also implies that localization is determined by increased retention rather than directed targeting...
  25. ncbi request reprint Dynamic binding of histone H1 to chromatin in living cells
    T Misteli
    National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Nature 408:877-81. 2000
    ..These results support a model in which linker histones bind dynamically to chromatin in a stop-and-go mode...
  26. ncbi request reprint The flow of gene expression
    Tom Misteli
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Nat Struct Mol Biol 11:202-5. 2004
    ..A recent meeting in Iguazu Falls, Argentina, highlighted the need to uncover both the molecular details of each single step as well as the mechanisms of coordination among processes in order to fully understand the expression of genes...
  27. pmc The concept of self-organization in cellular architecture
    T Misteli
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    J Cell Biol 155:181-5. 2001
    ..The dynamic properties of several cellular structures are consistent with a role for self-organization in their formation, maintenance, and function; therefore, self-organization might be a general principle in cellular organization...
  28. pmc Higher-order genome organization in human disease
    Tom Misteli
    National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol 2:a000794. 2010
    ....
  29. ncbi request reprint Concepts in nuclear architecture
    Tom Misteli
    National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Bioessays 27:477-87. 2005
    ..Here I give an overview of some of the emerging concepts in the study of in vivo genome organization and function...
  30. pmc Physiological importance of RNA and protein mobility in the cell nucleus
    Tom Misteli
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 41 Library Drive, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA
    Histochem Cell Biol 129:5-11. 2008
    ..Most importantly, the dynamic nature of proteins and RNAs is emerging as a means to control physiological cellular responses and pathways...
  31. ncbi request reprint RNA splicing: What has phosphorylation got to do with it?
    T Misteli
    National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Curr Biol 9:R198-200. 1999
    ..Recent observations suggest that phosphorylation modulates protein-protein interactions within the spliceosome, thereby contributing to dynamic structural reorganization of the spliceosome during splicing...
  32. pmc Hyperdynamic plasticity of chromatin proteins in pluripotent embryonic stem cells
    Eran Meshorer
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Dev Cell 10:105-16. 2006
    ....
  33. pmc Mitotic phosphorylation prevents the binding of HMGN proteins to chromatin
    M Prymakowska-Bosak
    Protein Section, Laboratory of Metabolism, DBS, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Mol Cell Biol 21:5169-78. 2001
    ..We conclude that during mitosis the NBD of HMGN proteins is highly phosphorylated and that this modification regulates the interaction of the proteins with chromatin...
  34. pmc Functional architecture in the cell nucleus
    M Dundr
    National Cancer Institute, NIH, 41 Library Drive, Building 41, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Biochem J 356:297-310. 2001
    ..Finally, we speculate that self-organization might play a substantial role in establishing and maintaining nuclear organization...
  35. ncbi request reprint Correction of alternative splicing of tau in frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17
    B Kalbfuss
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    J Biol Chem 276:42986-93. 2001
    ..These findings provide a tool to study specific tau isoforms in vivo and might lead to a novel therapeutic strategy for FTDP-17...
  36. pmc The double bromodomain protein Brd4 binds to acetylated chromatin during interphase and mitosis
    Anup Dey
    Laboratory of Molecular Growth Regulation, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:8758-63. 2003
    ..This colocalization also required both bromodomains. These observations indicate that Brd4 specifically recognizes acetylated histone codes, and this recognition is passed onto the chromatin of newly divided cells...
  37. ncbi request reprint Maintenance of stable heterochromatin domains by dynamic HP1 binding
    Thierry Cheutin
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Science 299:721-5. 2003
    ..These data argue against HP1 repression of transcription by formation of static, higher order oligomeric networks but support a dynamic competition model, and they demonstrate that heterochromatin is accessible to regulatory factors...
  38. ncbi request reprint A kinetic framework for a mammalian RNA polymerase in vivo
    Miroslav Dundr
    National Cancer Institute NCI, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Science 298:1623-6. 2002
    ..Our data provide a kinetic and mechanistic framework for the function of a mammalian RNA polymerase in living cells...
  39. ncbi request reprint Chromosome positioning in the interphase nucleus
    Luis Parada
    National Cancer Inst, NIH, 20892, Bethesda, MD, USA
    Trends Cell Biol 12:425-32. 2002
    ..Here, we discuss emerging models of non-random nuclear chromosome organization and consider the functional implications of chromosome positioning for gene expression and genome stability...
  40. ncbi request reprint An uncertainty principle in chromosome positioning
    Luis A Parada
    National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Trends Cell Biol 13:393-6. 2003
    ..Two reports have applied in vivo microscopy to track chromosomes in space and time. The results highlight the inherently imperfect and probabilistic nature of chromosome positioning in the cell nucleus...
  41. pmc Mobility and immobility of chromatin in transcription and genome stability
    Evi Soutoglou
    National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, United States
    Curr Opin Genet Dev 17:435-42. 2007
    ....
  42. pmc Network of dynamic interactions between histone H1 and high-mobility-group proteins in chromatin
    Frédéric Catez
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Mol Cell Biol 24:4321-8. 2004
    ..We suggest that a network of dynamic and competitive interactions involving HMG proteins and H1, and perhaps other structural proteins, constantly modulates nucleosome accessibility and the local structure of the chromatin fiber...
  43. pmc Global transcription in pluripotent embryonic stem cells
    Sol Efroni
    National Cancer Institute Center for Bioinformatics, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD 20852, USA
    Cell Stem Cell 2:437-47. 2008
    ..We propose that global transcription is a hallmark of pluripotent ESCs, contributing to their plasticity, and that lineage specification is driven by reduction of the transcribed portion of the genome...
  44. ncbi request reprint Genomes, proteomes, and dynamic networks in the cell nucleus
    Jeffrey Roix
    National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Histochem Cell Biol 118:105-16. 2002
    ..These insights are changing our view of the nucleus and the cell as a whole...
  45. pmc Competition between histone H1 and HMGN proteins for chromatin binding sites
    Frédéric Catez
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    EMBO Rep 3:760-6. 2002
    ....
  46. pmc In vivo dynamics of Swi6 in yeast: evidence for a stochastic model of heterochromatin
    Thierry Cheutin
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Mol Cell Biol 24:3157-67. 2004
    ..The observed dynamics of Swi6 binding are consistent with a stochastic model of heterochromatin and indicate evolutionary conservation of heterochromatin protein binding properties from mammals to yeast...
  47. pmc Differential in vivo binding dynamics of somatic and oocyte-specific linker histones in oocytes and during ES cell nuclear transfer
    Matthias Becker
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Mol Biol Cell 16:3887-95. 2005
    ..These results provide the first mechanistic insights into the crucial step of linker histone replacement as it occurs during fertilization and somatic cell nuclear transfer...
  48. ncbi request reprint HGPS-Derived iPSCs For The Ages
    Tom Misteli
    National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Cell Stem Cell 8:4-6. 2011
    ..These cells are a much-needed new tool to study HGPS, and their use may lead to novel insights into mechanisms of aging...
  49. pmc Regulation of alternative splicing by histone modifications
    Reini F Luco
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Science 327:996-1000. 2010
    ..Histone marks affect splicing outcome by influencing the recruitment of splicing regulators via a chromatin-binding protein. These results outline an adaptor system for the reading of histone marks by the pre-mRNA splicing machinery...
  50. pmc Lamin A-dependent misregulation of adult stem cells associated with accelerated ageing
    Paola Scaffidi
    National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Nat Cell Biol 10:452-9. 2008
    ..Our results support a model in which accelerated ageing in HGPS patients, and possibly also physiological ageing, is the result of adult stem cell dysfunction and progressive deterioration of tissue functions...
  51. pmc Activation of the cellular DNA damage response in the absence of DNA lesions
    Evi Soutoglou
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Science 320:1507-10. 2008
    ..We conclude that activation of the DDR does not require DNA damage and stable association of repair factors with chromatin is likely a critical step in triggering, amplifying, and maintaining the DDR signal...
  52. ncbi request reprint Chromatin in pluripotent embryonic stem cells and differentiation
    Eran Meshorer
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 7:540-6. 2006
    ..We discuss how unique properties of chromatin in ES cells contribute to the maintenance of pluripotency and the determination of differentiation properties...
  53. doi request reprint Transcription dynamics
    Gordon L Hager
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Mol Cell 35:741-53. 2009
    ..Its dynamic nature is not only a fundamental property of the transcription machinery, but it is emerging as an important modulator of physiological processes, particularly in differentiation and development...
  54. pmc Spatial genome organization in the formation of chromosomal translocations
    Karen J Meaburn
    National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, United States
    Semin Cancer Biol 17:80-90. 2007
    ..We review here the emerging principles of spatial genome organization and discuss the implications of non-random spatial genome organization for the genesis and specificity of cancerous chromosomal translocations...
  55. ncbi request reprint Systems biology in the cell nucleus
    Stanislaw Gorski
    National Cancer Institute, NIH, 41 Library Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    J Cell Sci 118:4083-92. 2005
    ..Converging technological developments in genomics, proteomics, dynamics and computation are now leading towards such an integrated biological understanding of genome biology and nuclear function...
  56. pmc In vivo kinetics of Cajal body components
    Miroslav Dundr
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    J Cell Biol 164:831-42. 2004
    ..These results suggest that CBs and gems are kinetically independent structures...
  57. ncbi request reprint Spatial genome organization
    Luis A Parada
    National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Exp Cell Res 296:64-70. 2004
    ..Here we discuss potential functional consequences of spatial genome organization and we speculate on the possible molecular mechanisms of how genomes are organized within the space of the mammalian cell nucleus...
  58. pmc Recruitment of dioxin receptor to active transcription sites
    Cem Elbi
    Laboratory of Receptor Biology and Gene Expression, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 5055, USA
    Mol Biol Cell 13:2001-15. 2002
    ..These results indicate that AhR/ARNT complexes are recruited to specific subnuclear compartments in a ligand-dependent manner and that these foci represent the sites of AhR target genes...
  59. ncbi request reprint Chromokinesins: multitalented players in mitosis
    Manjari Mazumdar
    National Cancer Institute NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Trends Cell Biol 15:349-55. 2005
    ....
  60. ncbi request reprint E2F-dependent repression of topoisomerase II regulates heterochromatin formation and apoptosis in cells with melanoma-prone mutation
    Wan Jiao
    Cell Cycle and Human Diseases Group, Laboratory of Cell Regulation and Carcinogenesis, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Cancer Res 65:4067-77. 2005
    ..These observations provide novel insight into the mechanism of drug action that influence treatment outcome: drug sensitivity or drug resistance...
  61. pmc Human chromokinesin KIF4A functions in chromosome condensation and segregation
    Manjari Mazumdar
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bldg 41, Rm B 507, 41 Library Dr, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    J Cell Biol 166:613-20. 2004
    ..Our results provide functional evidence that human KIF4A is a novel component of the chromosome condensation and segregation machinery functioning in multiple steps of mitotic division...
  62. pmc A cyclophilin functions in pre-mRNA splicing
    David S Horowitz
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA
    EMBO J 21:470-80. 2002
    ..These results provide an example of the function of a cyclophilin in a complex process and provide insight into the mechanisms of action of cyclophilins...
  63. pmc Reversal of the cellular phenotype in the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome
    Paola Scaffidi
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Nat Med 11:440-5. 2005
    ..Our results establish proof of principle for the correction of the premature aging phenotype in individuals with HGPS...
  64. ncbi request reprint Spatial genome organization during T-cell differentiation
    S H Kim
    National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Cytogenet Genome Res 105:292-301. 2004
    ..Our results demonstrate that significant spatial genome reorganization occurs during differentiation and indicate that the relationship between dynamic genome topology and single gene regulation is highly complex...
  65. pmc Modulation of RNA polymerase assembly dynamics in transcriptional regulation
    Stanislaw A Gorski
    National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Receptor Biology and Gene Expression, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Mol Cell 30:486-97. 2008
    ..Our results show that regulation of rDNA transcription in vivo occurs via modulation of the efficiency of transcription complex subunit capture and assembly...
  66. ncbi request reprint Spatial proximity of translocation-prone gene loci in human lymphomas
    Jeffrey J Roix
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Nat Genet 34:287-91. 2003
    ..Our results suggest that the formation of specific translocations in human lymphomas, and perhaps other tissues, is determined in part by higher-order spatial organization of the genome...
  67. ncbi request reprint Splicing misplaced
    Eran Meshorer
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Cell 122:317-8. 2005
    ..In this issue of Cell, Denis et al. (2005) now report the presence of functional spliceosomes and signal-dependent pre-mRNA splicing in the cytoplasm of platelets...
  68. doi request reprint Cancer epigenetics: from disruption of differentiation programs to the emergence of cancer stem cells
    P Scaffidi
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Cold Spring Harb Symp Quant Biol 75:251-8. 2010
    ..Epigenetic interference and loss of cellular identity may be particularly relevant for the emergence of cancer stem cells...
  69. ncbi request reprint The road much traveled: trafficking in the cell nucleus
    Stanislaw A Gorski
    National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Curr Opin Cell Biol 18:284-90. 2006
    ..Control of RNA and protein trafficking is now emerging as a physiological regulatory mechanism in gene expression and nuclear function...
  70. pmc Allele-specific nuclear positioning of the monoallelically expressed astrocyte marker GFAP
    Takumi Takizawa
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Genes Dev 22:489-98. 2008
    ..These results provide direct evidence for function-related differential positioning of individual gene alleles within the interphase nucleus...
  71. ncbi request reprint Nucleolomics: an inventory of the nucleolus
    Miroslav Dundr
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Mol Cell 9:5-7. 2002
    ..As a byproduct of this tour de force, a novel nuclear compartment, the paraspeckles, was identified...
  72. pmc Potential roles for ubiquitin and the proteasome during ribosome biogenesis
    Diana A Stavreva
    Laboratory of Receptor Biology and Gene Expression, Center for Cancer Research corrected National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Mol Cell Biol 26:5131-45. 2006
    ..Together, these results suggest that the UPS is probably involved at many steps during ribosome biogenesis, including the maturation of the 90S preribosome...
  73. ncbi request reprint Quantitation of GFP-fusion proteins in single living cells
    Miroslav Dundr
    National Cancer Institute, NIH, 41 Library Drive, Bldg 41, Bethesda, MD 20892 5055, USA
    J Struct Biol 140:92-9. 2002
    ..VLP-GFP calibration is a simple, convenient, rapid, and noninvasive method for routine quantification of GFP-labeled molecules in single, living cells...
  74. ncbi request reprint Conservation of relative chromosome positioning in normal and cancer cells
    Luis A Parada
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Curr Biol 12:1692-7. 2002
    ....
  75. doi request reprint Measuring dynamics of nuclear proteins by photobleaching
    Miroslav Dundr
    National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    Curr Protoc Cell Biol . 2003
    ..Each of these techniques has characteristics permitting the determination of distinct parameters of protein behavior in vivo...
  76. ncbi request reprint HTLV-1-encoded p30II is a post-transcriptional negative regulator of viral replication
    Christophe Nicot
    Animal Models and Retroviral Vaccines Section, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 41 D804, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Nat Med 10:197-201. 2004
    ..Because Tex and Rex are positive regulators of viral gene expression, their inhibition by p30(II) reduces virion production. p30(II) inhibits virus expression by reducing Tax and Rex protein expression...
  77. pmc Good news in the nuclear envelope: loss of lamin A might be a gain
    Paola Scaffidi
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    J Clin Invest 116:632-4. 2006
    ..The good news is these findings open the door to a new strategy for the therapeutic treatment of diseases caused by mutations in lamin A, such as muscular dystrophies and some types of premature aging syndromes...
  78. pmc Formation of nuclear splicing factor compartments is independent of lamins A/C
    Jaromira Vecerova
    Department of Cell Biology, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Cellular Biology and Pathology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic
    Mol Biol Cell 15:4904-10. 2004
    ....
  79. ncbi request reprint Nuclear architecture--an island no more
    Abby F Dernburg
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
    Dev Cell 12:329-34. 2007
    ..Emerging from this conference was a holistic view in which diverse chemical and physical signals link the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments of cells...
  80. ncbi request reprint Genome instability in progeria: when repair gets old
    Tom Misteli
    Nat Med 11:718-9. 2005
  81. pmc Condensed mitotic chromatin is accessible to transcription factors and chromatin structural proteins
    Danyang Chen
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, The Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA
    J Cell Biol 168:41-54. 2005
    ..The phase-specific exchanges of nucleosome components during late mitotic phases are consistent with an emerging model of replication independent core histone replacement...
  82. ncbi request reprint Cell biology: chromosome territories
    Karen J Meaburn
    Nature 445:379-781. 2007
  83. pmc Ubiquitination regulates PTEN nuclear import and tumor suppression
    Lloyd C Trotman
    Cancer Biology and Genetics Program, Sloan Kettering Institute, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Cell 128:141-56. 2007
    ....
  84. ncbi request reprint Rrn3 phosphorylation is a regulatory checkpoint for ribosome biogenesis
    Alice H Cavanaugh
    Sigfried and Janet Weis Center for Research, Geisinger Clinic, 100 N Academy Avenue, Danville, PA 17821, USA
    J Biol Chem 277:27423-32. 2002
    ..These results suggest that the phosphorylation state of Rrn3 regulates rDNA transcription by determining the steady-state concentration of the Rrn3.RNA polymerase I complex within the nucleolus...
  85. ncbi request reprint Neural induction promotes large-scale chromatin reorganisation of the Mash1 locus
    Ruth R E Williams
    Lymphocyte Development Group, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London, W12 0NN, UK
    J Cell Sci 119:132-40. 2006
    ..These results suggest that Mash1 is regulated by changes in chromatin structure and location and implicate the nuclear periphery as an important environment for maintaining the undifferentiated state of ES cells...
  86. pmc Chinese hamster ORC subunits dynamically associate with chromatin throughout the cell-cycle
    Adrian J McNairn
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, S U N Y Upstate Medical University, 750 East Adams Street, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA
    Exp Cell Res 308:345-56. 2005
    ..In vivo interaction with chromatin was not significantly altered throughout the cell-cycle, including S-phase. These data support a model in which ORC subunits dynamically interact with chromatin throughout the cell-cycle...
  87. ncbi request reprint Measurement of dynamic protein binding to chromatin in vivo, using photobleaching microscopy
    Robert D Phair
    BioInformatics Services, Rockville, Maryland 20854, USA
    Methods Enzymol 375:393-414. 2004
    ..These methods should prove useful in the further in vivo investigation of the molecular mechanisms involved in genome organization and expression...
  88. ncbi request reprint The ATM repair pathway inhibits RNA polymerase I transcription in response to chromosome breaks
    Michael Kruhlak
    Experimental Immunology, NCI
    Nature 447:730-4. 2007
    ..Our data reveal a novel ATM/NBS1/MDC1-dependent pathway that shuts down ribosomal gene transcription in response to chromosome breaks...
  89. pmc Functional association of Sun1 with nuclear pore complexes
    Qian Liu
    Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
    J Cell Biol 178:785-98. 2007
    ..The implication is that Sun1 represents an important determinant of NPC distribution across the nuclear surface...
  90. ncbi request reprint Release of chromatin protein HMGB1 by necrotic cells triggers inflammation
    Paola Scaffidi
    DIBIT, Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele, 20132 Milano, Italy
    Nature 418:191-5. 2002
    ..Thus, cells undergoing apoptosis are programmed to withhold the signal that is broadcast by cells that have been damaged or killed by trauma...
  91. pmc Global nature of dynamic protein-chromatin interactions in vivo: three-dimensional genome scanning and dynamic interaction networks of chromatin proteins
    Robert D Phair
    BioInformatics Services, Rockville, MD 20854, USA
    Mol Cell Biol 24:6393-402. 2004
    ..We suggest that these properties are crucial for generating high plasticity in genome expression...
  92. pmc TDP-43 regulates retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation through the repression of cyclin-dependent kinase 6 expression
    Youhna M Ayala
    International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Padriciano 99, 34012 Trieste, Italy
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:3785-9. 2008
    ..Our results identify a regulatory target of TDP-43 and show that TDP-43 depletion has important consequences in essential metabolic processes in human cells...
  93. ncbi request reprint Division of labor: minor splicing in the cytoplasm
    Javier F Caceres
    MRC Human Genetics Unit, Edinburgh, UK
    Cell 131:645-7. 2007
    ..In this issue of Cell, König et al. (2007) demonstrate that the two splicing pathways are spatially separated in the cell and may have distinct functions...
  94. ncbi request reprint H1FOO is coupled to the initiation of oocytic growth
    Mamoru Tanaka
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku ku, Tokyo 160 0082, Japan
    Biol Reprod 72:135-42. 2005
    ....
  95. pmc Mapping the interaction surface of linker histone H1(0) with the nucleosome of native chromatin in vivo
    David T Brown
    Department of Biochemistry, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi 39216, USA
    Nat Struct Mol Biol 13:250-5. 2006
    ..Multiple residues bind cooperatively to form a highly specific chromatosome structure that provides a mechanism by which individual domains of linker histones interact to facilitate chromatin condensation...