Laura M Koehly

Summary

Affiliation: National Institutes of Health
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Sitting time and health outcomes among Mexican origin adults: obesity as a mediator
    Hendrik D de Heer
    Department of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training, Northern Arizona University, 208 E Pine Knoll Dr Bldg 66, Rm 112, PO Box 15105, Flagstaff 86011, AZ, USA
    BMC Public Health 12:896. 2012
  2. pmc Willingness of Mexican-American adults to share family health history with healthcare providers
    Laura M Koehly
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute NIH, 31 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Am J Prev Med 40:633-6. 2011
  3. pmc Sisters in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer families: communal coping, social integration, and psychological well-being
    Laura M Koehly
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA
    Psychooncology 17:812-21. 2008
  4. pmc Adolescent obesity and social networks
    Laura M Koehly
    National Institutes of Health, Building 31, B1B37D, 31 Center Dr, MSC 2073, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Prev Chronic Dis 6:A99. 2009
  5. pmc Characteristics of health information gatherers, disseminators, and blockers within families at risk of hereditary cancer: implications for family health communication interventions
    Laura M Koehly
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Building 31, Room B1B37D, 31 Center Drive MSC 2073, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Am J Public Health 99:2203-9. 2009
  6. pmc Social influence and motivation to change health behaviors among Mexican-origin adults: implications for diet and physical activity
    Sato Ashida
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Am J Health Promot 26:176-9. 2012
  7. pmc The role of disease perceptions and results sharing in psychological adaptation after genetic susceptibility testing: the REVEAL Study
    Sato Ashida
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892 2073, USA
    Eur J Hum Genet 18:1296-301. 2010
  8. pmc Communication, encouragement, and cancer screening in families with and without mutations for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer: a pilot study
    Anne L Ersig
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    Genet Med 11:728-34. 2009
  9. doi request reprint Generation after generation: exploring the psychological impact of providing genetic services through a cascading approach
    Donald W Hadley
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 2073, USA
    Genet Med 12:808-15. 2010
  10. pmc Motivation for health screening: evaluation of social influence among Mexican-American adults
    Sato Ashida
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Am J Prev Med 38:396-402. 2010

Detail Information

Publications22

  1. pmc Sitting time and health outcomes among Mexican origin adults: obesity as a mediator
    Hendrik D de Heer
    Department of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training, Northern Arizona University, 208 E Pine Knoll Dr Bldg 66, Rm 112, PO Box 15105, Flagstaff 86011, AZ, USA
    BMC Public Health 12:896. 2012
    ....
  2. pmc Willingness of Mexican-American adults to share family health history with healthcare providers
    Laura M Koehly
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute NIH, 31 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Am J Prev Med 40:633-6. 2011
    ..Collecting family health history (FHH) information to share with healthcare providers is an important aspect of health-risk assessment...
  3. pmc Sisters in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer families: communal coping, social integration, and psychological well-being
    Laura M Koehly
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA
    Psychooncology 17:812-21. 2008
    ..We investigated the association between psychological distress and indices of social integration and communal coping among sisters from hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) families...
  4. pmc Adolescent obesity and social networks
    Laura M Koehly
    National Institutes of Health, Building 31, B1B37D, 31 Center Dr, MSC 2073, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Prev Chronic Dis 6:A99. 2009
    ....
  5. pmc Characteristics of health information gatherers, disseminators, and blockers within families at risk of hereditary cancer: implications for family health communication interventions
    Laura M Koehly
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Building 31, Room B1B37D, 31 Center Drive MSC 2073, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Am J Public Health 99:2203-9. 2009
    ..Given the importance of the dissemination of accurate family history to assess disease risk, we characterized the gatherers, disseminators, and blockers of health information within families at high genetic risk of cancer...
  6. pmc Social influence and motivation to change health behaviors among Mexican-origin adults: implications for diet and physical activity
    Sato Ashida
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Am J Health Promot 26:176-9. 2012
    ..To evaluate whether influence from social network members is associated with motivation to change dietary and physical activity behaviors...
  7. pmc The role of disease perceptions and results sharing in psychological adaptation after genetic susceptibility testing: the REVEAL Study
    Sato Ashida
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892 2073, USA
    Eur J Hum Genet 18:1296-301. 2010
    ..Enhancing discussion with regard to risks and concerns about AD during pretesting counseling and obtaining support through sharing the results after testing may help facilitate test recipients' long-term psychological adaptation...
  8. pmc Communication, encouragement, and cancer screening in families with and without mutations for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer: a pilot study
    Anne L Ersig
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    Genet Med 11:728-34. 2009
    ..Little is known about colonoscopy completion in families suspected of having hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer but without identified mutations...
  9. doi request reprint Generation after generation: exploring the psychological impact of providing genetic services through a cascading approach
    Donald W Hadley
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 2073, USA
    Genet Med 12:808-15. 2010
    ..This study examines whether previous family experiences with genetic services influences levels of psychological well-being of family members receiving services later...
  10. pmc Motivation for health screening: evaluation of social influence among Mexican-American adults
    Sato Ashida
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Am J Prev Med 38:396-402. 2010
    ..Americans of Mexican origin are at high risk for developing cardiovascular disease...
  11. doi request reprint The behavioral response to personalized genetic information: will genetic risk profiles motivate individuals and families to choose more healthful behaviors?
    Colleen M McBride
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Annu Rev Public Health 31:89-103. 2010
    ..Another promising area for research is consideration of using genetic information to identify risk shared within kinship networks and to expand the influence of behavior change beyond the individual...
  12. pmc Age-related differences in biomedical and folk beliefs as causes for diabetes and heart disease among Mexican origin adults
    Aunchalee E L Palmquist
    National Institutes of Health, National Human Genome Research Institute, Social and Behavioral Research Branch, Bethesda, MD, USA
    J Immigr Minor Health 14:596-601. 2012
    ..Age-related differences in causal beliefs may have implications for designing culturally appropriate health services, such as tailored diabetes interventions for older Mexican origin adults...
  13. pmc Changes in female support network systems and adaptation after breast cancer diagnosis: differences between older and younger patients
    Sato Ashida
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, 31 Center Drive, B1B37C, Bethesda, MD 20892 2073, USA
    Gerontologist 49:549-59. 2009
    ..This study evaluates the changes in social networks of older and younger breast cancer patients over a 6-month period following their first diagnosis and how such modifications are associated with changes in the patients' mood state...
  14. pmc Unpacking the blockers: understanding perceptions and social constraints of health communication in hereditary breast ovarian cancer (HBOC) susceptibility families
    June A Peters
    Clinical Genetics Branch CGB, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics DCEG, National Cancer Institute NCI, National Institutes of Health NIH, Department of Health and Human Services DHHS, Rockville, MD 20852, USA
    J Genet Couns 20:450-64. 2011
    ..Blocking often seemed to involve bi-directional feedback loops, in keeping with Lepore's Social Constraints and Modulation Theory. Privacy and protectiveness predominated as explanations for long-term blocking...
  15. doi request reprint The role of religious and existential well-being in families with Lynch syndrome: prevention, family communication, and psychosocial adjustment
    Bronwyn A Morris
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA
    J Genet Couns 22:482-91. 2013
    ..Interventions considering family-level factors may provide efficient pathways to improving psychosocial factors, screening practices, communication about disease risk and genetic testing, and cancer prevention. ..
  16. pmc Disclosing the disclosure: factors associated with communicating the results of genetic susceptibility testing for Alzheimer's disease
    Sato Ashida
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 2073, USA
    J Health Commun 14:768-84. 2009
    ..65). Beliefs about AD risks and causes, genetic testing, and development of treatments partly may determine the interpersonal communication patterns of genetic susceptibility test results...
  17. doi request reprint Online communication about genetics and body weight: implications for health behavior and internet-based education
    Susan Persky
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    J Health Commun 18:241-9. 2013
    ..They may also have implications for the creation of online evidence-based tools to aid communication about genetic advances in ways that encourage positive dietary and physical activity behavior...
  18. pmc African Americans' responses to genetic explanations of lung cancer disparities and their willingness to participate in clinical genetics research
    Della Brown White
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 2073, USA
    Genet Med 12:496-502. 2010
    ..To assess whether reactions to genetic explanations for disparities in lung cancer incidence among family members of African American patients with lung cancer are associated with willingness to participate in clinical genetics research...
  19. doi request reprint Future health applications of genomics: priorities for communication, behavioral, and social sciences research
    Colleen M McBride
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Am J Prev Med 38:556-65. 2010
    ....
  20. pmc "The cancer bond": exploring the formation of cancer risk perception in families with Lynch syndrome
    Aunchalee E L Palmquist
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA
    J Genet Couns 19:473-86. 2010
    ..Understanding how different types of family communication influence the formation of perceived hereditary disease risk may enhance efforts to tailor genetic counseling services for families...
  21. pmc Colon cancer screening practices and disclosure after receipt of positive or inconclusive genetic test results for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer
    Anne L Ersig
    Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 2073, USA
    Cancer 115:4071-9. 2009
    ..This study compared endoscopy use and disclosure between individuals with positive and inconclusive genetic test results, within a year after results were received...
  22. pmc Comprehensive annotation of bidirectional promoters identifies co-regulation among breast and ovarian cancer genes
    Mary Q Yang
    Genome Technology Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland, United States of America
    PLoS Comput Biol 3:e72. 2007
    ..Interpreting the regulation of genes involved in co-expression networks, especially those involved in cancer, will be an important step toward defining molecular events that may contribute to disease...