Matthew W Kelley

Summary

Affiliation: National Institutes of Health
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Leading Wnt down a PCP path: Cthrc1 acts as a coreceptor in the Wnt-PCP pathway
    Matthew W Kelley
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Dev Cell 15:7-8. 2008
  2. pmc Wnt activity guides facial branchiomotor neuron migration, and involves the PCP pathway and JNK and ROCK kinases
    Valerie Vivancos
    MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology, King s College, Guy s Campus, London, SE1 1UL, UK
    Neural Dev 4:7. 2009
  3. pmc Regulation of cell fate and patterning in the developing mammalian cochlea
    Matthew W Kelley
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 17:381-7. 2009
  4. ncbi request reprint Hair cell development: commitment through differentiation
    Matthew W Kelley
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, 35 Convent Drive, Bethesda, MA 20892, USA
    Brain Res 1091:172-85. 2006
  5. pmc Has hair cell loss MET its match?
    Matthew W Kelley
    National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Porter Neuroscience Research Center, 35 Convent Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:16400-1. 2007
  6. ncbi request reprint Cellular commitment and differentiation in the organ of Corti
    Matthew W Kelley
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    Int J Dev Biol 51:571-83. 2007
  7. ncbi request reprint Regulation of cell fate in the sensory epithelia of the inner ear
    Matthew W Kelley
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, 35 Convent Dr, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Nat Rev Neurosci 7:837-49. 2006
  8. doi request reprint Rbpj regulates development of prosensory cells in the mammalian inner ear
    Norio Yamamoto
    Laboratory of Cochlear Development, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, NIDCD, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Dev Biol 353:367-79. 2011
  9. doi request reprint Insulin-like growth factor signaling regulates the timing of sensory cell differentiation in the mouse cochlea
    Takayuki Okano
    Laboratory of Cochlear Development, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Porter Neuroscience Research Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    J Neurosci 31:18104-18. 2011
  10. pmc Sox2 signaling in prosensory domain specification and subsequent hair cell differentiation in the developing cochlea
    Alain Dabdoub
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, NIDCD, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:18396-401. 2008

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications56

  1. doi request reprint Leading Wnt down a PCP path: Cthrc1 acts as a coreceptor in the Wnt-PCP pathway
    Matthew W Kelley
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Dev Cell 15:7-8. 2008
    ..A paper by Yamamoto et al. in this issue of Developmental Cell identifies collagen triple helix repeat containing 1 as a Wnt-binding cofactor that specifically activates the Wnt-PCP pathway...
  2. pmc Wnt activity guides facial branchiomotor neuron migration, and involves the PCP pathway and JNK and ROCK kinases
    Valerie Vivancos
    MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology, King s College, Guy s Campus, London, SE1 1UL, UK
    Neural Dev 4:7. 2009
    ..In this study, we investigated a possible role of Wnts and the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway in this process...
  3. pmc Regulation of cell fate and patterning in the developing mammalian cochlea
    Matthew W Kelley
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 17:381-7. 2009
    ..In addition, targeted modulation of these same factors could be developed as therapies for hair cell regeneration...
  4. ncbi request reprint Hair cell development: commitment through differentiation
    Matthew W Kelley
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, 35 Convent Drive, Bethesda, MA 20892, USA
    Brain Res 1091:172-85. 2006
    ..This review will summarize results from each of these developmental events and describe the molecular signaling pathways involved...
  5. pmc Has hair cell loss MET its match?
    Matthew W Kelley
    National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Porter Neuroscience Research Center, 35 Convent Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:16400-1. 2007
  6. ncbi request reprint Cellular commitment and differentiation in the organ of Corti
    Matthew W Kelley
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    Int J Dev Biol 51:571-83. 2007
    ..In this review I will present an overview of cochlear development and then discuss some of the most recent and enlightening results regarding the molecular mechanism underlying the formation of this remarkable structure...
  7. ncbi request reprint Regulation of cell fate in the sensory epithelia of the inner ear
    Matthew W Kelley
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, 35 Convent Dr, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Nat Rev Neurosci 7:837-49. 2006
    ..However, new methodologies have resulted in significant steps forward in our understanding of the molecular pathways that direct cells towards these cell fates...
  8. doi request reprint Rbpj regulates development of prosensory cells in the mammalian inner ear
    Norio Yamamoto
    Laboratory of Cochlear Development, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, NIDCD, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Dev Biol 353:367-79. 2011
    ..These results suggest important roles for Rbpj and notch signaling in multiple aspects of inner ear development including prosensory cell maturation, cellular differentiation and survival...
  9. doi request reprint Insulin-like growth factor signaling regulates the timing of sensory cell differentiation in the mouse cochlea
    Takayuki Okano
    Laboratory of Cochlear Development, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Porter Neuroscience Research Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    J Neurosci 31:18104-18. 2011
    ..The results also provide new insights regarding the pathological processes that underlie auditory defects in the absence of IGF signaling in both humans and mice...
  10. pmc Sox2 signaling in prosensory domain specification and subsequent hair cell differentiation in the developing cochlea
    Alain Dabdoub
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, NIDCD, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:18396-401. 2008
    ..These results demonstrate crucial and diverse roles for Sox2 in the development, specification, and maintenance of sensory cells within the cochlea...
  11. pmc Sox2 induces neuronal formation in the developing mammalian cochlea
    Chandrakala Puligilla
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience and Section on Synaptic Transmission, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    J Neurosci 30:714-22. 2010
    ..Finally, we demonstrate that nonsensory cells within the cochlea retain neural competence through at least the early postnatal period...
  12. pmc Hedgehog signaling regulates sensory cell formation and auditory function in mice and humans
    Elizabeth Carroll Driver
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    J Neurosci 28:7350-8. 2008
    ..These results suggest that HH signaling plays a key role in the specification, size, and location of the prosensory domain, and therefore of hair cells, within the cochlea...
  13. pmc Jxc1/Sobp, encoding a nuclear zinc finger protein, is critical for cochlear growth, cell fate, and patterning of the organ of corti
    Zheng Chen
    Sections on Neurogenetics, Laboratory of Molecular Biology, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland 20850, USA
    J Neurosci 28:6633-41. 2008
    ..Collectively, our data support a role for Jxc1 in controlling a critical step in cochlear growth, cell fate, and patterning of the organ of Corti...
  14. pmc The Atoh1-lineage gives rise to hair cells and supporting cells within the mammalian cochlea
    Elizabeth Carroll Driver
    Laboratory of Cochlear Development, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communications Disorders, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Dev Biol 376:86-98. 2013
    ..Our results demonstrate that the Atoh1-lineage is established early in cochlear development, but also show that expression of Atoh1 does not absolutely result in commitment to a HC fate...
  15. pmc Otic mesenchyme cells regulate spiral ganglion axon fasciculation through a Pou3f4/EphA4 signaling pathway
    Thomas M Coate
    Laboratory of Cochlear Development, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Neuron 73:49-63. 2012
    ..These results indicate a model whereby Pou3f4 in the otic mesenchyme establishes an Eph/ephrin-mediated fasciculation signal that promotes inner radial bundle formation...
  16. ncbi request reprint Inhibitors of differentiation and DNA binding (Ids) regulate Math1 and hair cell formation during the development of the organ of Corti
    Jennifer M Jones
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, Porter Neuroscience Center, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    J Neurosci 26:550-8. 2006
    ..These results indicate a key role for Ids in the regulation of expression of Math1 and hair cell differentiation in the developing cochlea...
  17. ncbi request reprint Fgf8 induces pillar cell fate and regulates cellular patterning in the mammalian cochlea
    Bonnie E Jacques
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, Porter Neuroscience Research Center, 35 Convent Dr, Room 2A 100, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Development 134:3021-9. 2007
    ..These results suggest that PCs might exist in a transient state of differentiation that makes them potential targets for regenerative therapies...
  18. pmc Myosin II regulates extension, growth and patterning in the mammalian cochlear duct
    Norio Yamamoto
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Development 136:1977-86. 2009
    ..Our results also provide insights into the cellular mechanisms that are required for the formation of highly ordered cellular patterns...
  19. pmc Thyroid hormone increases fibroblast growth factor receptor expression and disrupts cell mechanics in the developing organ of corti
    Katherine B Szarama
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, Laboratory of Cochlear Development, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA
    BMC Dev Biol 13:6. 2013
    ..The mammalian cochlea is an intriguing system to examine these mechanisms, as cellular structure plays a key role in tissue development, and thyroid hormone is required for the maturation of the cochlea in the first postnatal week...
  20. pmc Fgf signaling regulates development and transdifferentiation of hair cells and supporting cells in the basilar papilla
    Bonnie E Jacques
    Laboratory of Cochlear Development, NIDCD, NIH, Porter Neuroscience Research Center, 35 Convent Dr, Room 2A 100, Bethesda, MD 20892 3729, USA
    Hear Res 289:27-39. 2012
    ..The ability of Fgf signaling to inhibit transdifferentiation suggests that its down-regulation may be essential for the initial steps of HC formation, as well as for the maintenance of SC phenotypes...
  21. ncbi request reprint Asymmetric localization of Vangl2 and Fz3 indicate novel mechanisms for planar cell polarity in mammals
    Mireille Montcouquiol
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    J Neurosci 26:5265-75. 2006
    ..Together, our data support the idea that protein asymmetry plays an important role in the development of PCP, but the colocalization and interaction of Fz3 and Vangl2 suggests that novel PCP mechanisms exist in vertebrates...
  22. ncbi request reprint Math1 regulates development of the sensory epithelium in the mammalian cochlea
    Chad Woods
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Porter Neuroscience Research Center, Building 35, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Nat Neurosci 7:1310-8. 2004
    ..These results show that Math1 functions in the developing cochlea to initiate both inductive and inhibitory signals that regulate the overall formation of the sensory epithelia...
  23. pmc Building the world's best hearing aid; regulation of cell fate in the cochlea
    Chandrakala Puligilla
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Curr Opin Genet Dev 19:368-73. 2009
    ....
  24. pmc Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 regulates microtubule formation and cell surface mechanical properties in the developing organ of Corti
    Katherine B Szarama
    Auditory Mechanics Section, Laboratory of Cellular Biology, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA
    Bioarchitecture 2:214-9. 2012
    ..We conclude that microtubule formation is a major downstream effector of Fgf-receptor 3, and suggest this pathway impacts the formation of fluid spaces in the organ of Corti...
  25. doi request reprint Making sense with thyroid hormone--the role of T(3) in auditory development
    Lily Ng
    National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease, Laboratory of Endocrinology and Receptor Biology, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Nat Rev Endocrinol 9:296-307. 2013
    ..As sensory input provides the only means of acquiring information from the environment, the stimulation of sensory development is one of the most fundamental functions of T(3) signalling...
  26. pmc Transfection of mouse cochlear explants by electroporation
    Elizabeth C Driver
    National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    Curr Protoc Neurosci . 2010
    ..While the protocol is largely focused on embryonic cochlea, the same basic protocol can be used on cochleae from mice as old as P5...
  27. ncbi request reprint Planar and vertical signals control cellular differentiation and patterning in the mammalian cochlea
    Mireille Montcouquiol
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland 20850, USA
    J Neurosci 23:9469-78. 2003
    ..Finally, we demonstrate that the temporal gradient of cellular differentiation is not dependent on planar signals within the developing sensory epithelium...
  28. pmc Making connections in the inner ear: recent insights into the development of spiral ganglion neurons and their connectivity with sensory hair cells
    Thomas M Coate
    Laboratory of Cochlear Development, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Semin Cell Dev Biol 24:460-9. 2013
    ..Building upon foundational studies of neurogenesis and neurotrophins, we review here new concepts and technologies that are helping to enrich our understanding of the development of the nervous system within the inner ear. ..
  29. doi request reprint Planar cell polarity in the inner ear
    Helen May-Simera
    Laboratory of Cochlear Development, NIDCD, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    Curr Top Dev Biol 101:111-40. 2012
    ..Finally, the presence of shortened cochleae in many PCP mouse mutants has revealed an additional role for the PCP pathway in the development of the auditory system...
  30. pmc Specification of cell fate in the mammalian cochlea
    Elizabeth C Driver
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Birth Defects Res C Embryo Today 87:212-21. 2009
    ..A number of different signaling pathways and transcription factors are known to be necessary for these developmental processes; in this review, we will summarize these results with an emphasis on recent findings...
  31. ncbi request reprint Determination and commitment of mechanosensory hair cells
    Matthew W Kelley
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, 5 Research Court, Room 2B 44, Rockville, MD 20850, USA
    ScientificWorldJournal 2:1079-94. 2002
    ....
  32. ncbi request reprint Cellular growth and rearrangement during the development of the mammalian organ of Corti
    Erynn McKenzie
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland, USA
    Dev Dyn 229:802-12. 2004
    ..These results are consistent with the hypothesis that convergence and extension plays a role in cellular patterning within the organ of Corti...
  33. ncbi request reprint Disruption of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 signaling results in defects in cellular differentiation, neuronal patterning, and hearing impairment
    Chandrakala Puligilla
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, NIDCD NIH, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Dev Dyn 236:1905-17. 2007
    ....
  34. ncbi request reprint Identification of Vangl2 and Scrb1 as planar polarity genes in mammals
    Mireille Montcouquiol
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, NIDCD, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland 20850, USA
    Nature 423:173-7. 2003
    ..These results demonstrate a role for the PCP pathway in planar polarization in mammals, and identify Scrb1 as a PCP gene...
  35. pmc Molecular mechanisms of inner ear development
    Doris K Wu
    National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, Rockville, Maryland 20850, USA
    Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol 4:a008409. 2012
    ..This chapter focuses on molecular mechanisms of inner ear development derived from studies of model organisms...
  36. doi request reprint Examining planar cell polarity in the mammalian cochlea
    Helen May-Simera
    Laboratory of Cochlear Development, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 839:157-71. 2012
    ....
  37. doi request reprint Development of tonotopy in the auditory periphery
    Zoë F Mann
    Laboratory of Cochlear Development, NIDCD, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Hear Res 276:2-15. 2011
    ..However, recent studies of developing systems, including the inner ear provide some clues regarding the signalling pathways that may be instructive for the formation of a tonotopic axis...
  38. ncbi request reprint Cell adhesion molecules during inner ear and hair cell development, including notch and its ligands
    Matthew W Kelley
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland 20850, USA
    Curr Top Dev Biol 57:321-56. 2003
    ..At the same time, the generation of new transgenic and molecular technologies promises to provide researchers with new tools to examine the specific effects of different adhesion molecules during inner ear development...
  39. ncbi request reprint Planar cell polarity and a potential role for a Wnt morphogen gradient in stereociliary bundle orientation in the mammalian inner ear
    Alain Dabdoub
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    J Neurobiol 64:446-57. 2005
    ..Furthermore, we review evidence for the role of Wnt signaling, and the possible generation of a Wnt gradient, in planar polarity...
  40. ncbi request reprint Wnt signaling mediates reorientation of outer hair cell stereociliary bundles in the mammalian cochlea
    Alain Dabdoub
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, NIDCD, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD 20850, USA
    Development 130:2375-84. 2003
    ..We propose that Wnt signaling across the region of developing outer hair cells gives rise to planar polarity in the mammalian cochlea...
  41. doi request reprint Stem cell therapy for the inner ear: recent advances and future directions
    Takayuki Okano
    National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Trends Amplif 16:4-18. 2012
    ..Subsequent sections discuss the possible use of endogenous inner ear stem cells to induce repair as well as the initial studies aimed at transplanting stem cells into the ear...
  42. pmc Combining Cep290 and Mkks ciliopathy alleles in mice rescues sensory defects and restores ciliogenesis
    Rivka A Rachel
    Neurobiology Neurodegeneration and Repair Laboratory, National Eye Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    J Clin Invest 122:1233-45. 2012
    ..Amelioration of the sensory phenotypes caused by specific mutations in one protein by removal of an interacting domain/protein suggests a possible novel approach for treating human ciliopathies...
  43. ncbi request reprint Fibroblast growth factor signaling regulates pillar cell development in the organ of corti
    Kristen L Mueller
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland 20850, USA
    J Neurosci 22:9368-77. 2002
    ..Moreover, the position of the pillar cells appears to be determined by the activation of FGFR3 in a subset of the progenitor cells that initially express this receptor...
  44. ncbi request reprint Noncanonical Wnt signaling and neural polarity
    Mireille Montcouquiol
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, NIDCD, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland 20982, USA
    Annu Rev Neurosci 29:363-86. 2006
    ....
  45. pmc Expression and function of scleraxis in the developing auditory system
    Zoë F Mann
    Laboratory of Cochlear Development, NIDCD, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e75521. 2013
    ....
  46. pmc Cytoskeletal changes in actin and microtubules underlie the developing surface mechanical properties of sensory and supporting cells in the mouse cochlea
    Katherine B Szarama
    Section on Auditory Mechanics, Laboratory of Cellular Biology, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Development 139:2187-97. 2012
    ..Finally, this study found that the fibroblast growth factor signaling pathway is necessary for the developmental time course of cell surface mechanical properties, in part owing to the effects on microtubule structure...
  47. ncbi request reprint Analysis of nuclear receptor function in the mouse auditory system
    Matthew W Kelley
    Section on Developmental Neuroscience, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, 5 Research Court, Rockville, Maryland 20850, USA
    Methods Enzymol 364:426-48. 2003
  48. doi request reprint Expression of insulin-like growth factor binding proteins during mouse cochlear development
    Takayuki Okano
    Laboratory of Cochlear Development, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland
    Dev Dyn 242:1210-21. 2013
    ....
  49. pmc Cilia, Wnt signaling, and the cytoskeleton
    Helen L May-Simera
    Laboratory of Cochlear Development, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, NIH, 35 Convent Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Cilia 1:7. 2012
    ..This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the involvement of cilia and basal body proteins in Wnt signaling pathways...
  50. pmc Knock-in mouse model for resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH): an RTH mutation in the thyroid hormone receptor beta gene disrupts cochlear morphogenesis
    Andrew J Griffith
    Hearing Section, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD 20850, USA
    J Assoc Res Otolaryngol 3:279-88. 2002
    ..Comparison with the previously described phenotype of a Thrb -/- knockout strain suggests that Thrb(PV) disrupts the function of other genes that are critical for development and/or maintenance of these structures...
  51. ncbi request reprint From placode to polarization: new tunes in inner ear development
    Kate F Barald
    Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Program in Neuroscience, Cell and Molecular Biology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 0616, USA
    Development 131:4119-30. 2004
    ..This review summarizes studies addressing several key issues that shape our current thinking about inner ear development, with particular emphasis on early patterning events, sensory hair cell specification and planar cell polarity...
  52. ncbi request reprint Transcription profiling of inner ears from Pou4f3(ddl/ddl) identifies Gfi1 as a target of the Pou4f3 deafness gene
    Ronna Hertzano
    Department of Human Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel
    Hum Mol Genet 13:2143-53. 2004
    ..These results identify Gfi1 as the first downstream target of a hair cell specific transcription factor and suggest that outer hair cell degeneration in Pou4f3 mutants is largely or entirely a result of the loss of expression of Gfi1...
  53. ncbi request reprint Vascular development in the retina and inner ear: control by Norrin and Frizzled-4, a high-affinity ligand-receptor pair
    Qiang Xu
    Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Cell 116:883-95. 2004
    ..These data define a Norrin-Fz4 signaling system that plays a central role in vascular development in the eye and ear, and they indicate that ligands unrelated to Wnts can act through Fz receptors...
  54. pmc Hearing loss and retarded cochlear development in mice lacking type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase
    Lily Ng
    Department of Human Genetics and Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:3474-9. 2004
    ..Thus, D2 is essential for hearing, and the results suggest that this hormone-activating enzyme confers on the cochlea the ability to stimulate its own T3 response at a critical developmental period...
  55. ncbi request reprint Lhx3, a LIM domain transcription factor, is regulated by Pou4f3 in the auditory but not in the vestibular system
    Ronna Hertzano
    Department of Human Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel
    Eur J Neurosci 25:999-1005. 2007
    ..This is the first example of a hair cell-specific gene expressed both in auditory and in vestibular hair cells, with differential regulation of expression in these two closely related systems...
  56. pmc Myosin VI and VIIa distribution among inner ear epithelia in diverse fishes
    Allison B Coffin
    Department of Biology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA
    Hear Res 224:15-26. 2007
    ..The lack of myo6 in specific American shad utricular hair bundles indicates a unique quality of these cells among fishes, perhaps relating to ultrasound detection capability that is found in this species...