B Joseph Hinnebusch

Summary

Affiliation: National Institutes of Health
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint High-frequency conjugative transfer of antibiotic resistance genes to Yersinia pestis in the flea midgut
    B Joseph Hinnebusch
    Laboratory of Human Bacterial Pathogenesis, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA
    Mol Microbiol 46:349-54. 2002
  2. pmc Yersinia pestis YopJ suppresses tumor necrosis factor alpha induction and contributes to apoptosis of immune cells in the lymph node but is not required for virulence in a rat model of bubonic plague
    Nadine Lemaitre
    Rocky Mountain Laboratories, NIAID NIH, 903 S 4th St, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA
    Infect Immun 74:5126-31. 2006
  3. ncbi request reprint Acute oral toxicity of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis to fleas: implications for the evolution of vector-borne transmission of plague
    David L Erickson
    Laboratory of Zoonotic Pathogens, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, NIH, NIAID, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA
    Cell Microbiol 9:2658-66. 2007
  4. pmc Characterization of late acyltransferase genes of Yersinia pestis and their role in temperature-dependent lipid A variation
    Roberto Rebeil
    Laboratory of Human Bacterial Pathogenesis, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 903 S 4th St, Hamilton, Montana 59840, USA
    J Bacteriol 188:1381-8. 2006
  5. pmc Loss of a biofilm-inhibiting glycosyl hydrolase during the emergence of Yersinia pestis
    David L Erickson
    Laboratory of Zoonotic Pathogens, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, Montana 59840, USA
    J Bacteriol 190:8163-70. 2008
  6. pmc Transcriptomic and innate immune responses to Yersinia pestis in the lymph node during bubonic plague
    Jason E Comer
    Laboratory of Zoonotic Pathogens, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, Montana 59840, USA
    Infect Immun 78:5086-98. 2010
  7. pmc Serotype differences and lack of biofilm formation characterize Yersinia pseudotuberculosis infection of the Xenopsylla cheopis flea vector of Yersinia pestis
    David L Erickson
    Laboratory of Zoonotic Pathogens, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, 903 South 4th St, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA
    J Bacteriol 188:1113-9. 2006
  8. pmc Role of the Yersinia pestis Ail protein in preventing a protective polymorphonuclear leukocyte response during bubonic plague
    B Joseph Hinnebusch
    Laboratory of Zoonotic Pathogens, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, Montana 59840, USA
    Infect Immun 79:4984-9. 2011
  9. pmc Transit through the flea vector induces a pretransmission innate immunity resistance phenotype in Yersinia pestis
    Viveka Vadyvaloo
    Laboratory of Zoonotic Pathogens, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, Montana, United States of America
    PLoS Pathog 6:e1000783. 2010
  10. pmc Induction of the Yersinia pestis PhoP-PhoQ regulatory system in the flea and its role in producing a transmissible infection
    Roberto Rebeil
    Laboratory of Zoonotic Pathogens, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, Montana, USA
    J Bacteriol 195:1920-30. 2013

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications34

  1. ncbi request reprint High-frequency conjugative transfer of antibiotic resistance genes to Yersinia pestis in the flea midgut
    B Joseph Hinnebusch
    Laboratory of Human Bacterial Pathogenesis, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA
    Mol Microbiol 46:349-54. 2002
    ..Horizontal gene transfer in the flea may be the source of antibiotic-resistant Y. pestis strains recently isolated from plague patients in Madagascar...
  2. pmc Yersinia pestis YopJ suppresses tumor necrosis factor alpha induction and contributes to apoptosis of immune cells in the lymph node but is not required for virulence in a rat model of bubonic plague
    Nadine Lemaitre
    Rocky Mountain Laboratories, NIAID NIH, 903 S 4th St, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA
    Infect Immun 74:5126-31. 2006
    ..pestis. Instead, the effects of YopJ appear to overlap and augment the immunomodulatory effects of other Y. pestis virulence factors...
  3. ncbi request reprint Acute oral toxicity of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis to fleas: implications for the evolution of vector-borne transmission of plague
    David L Erickson
    Laboratory of Zoonotic Pathogens, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, NIH, NIAID, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA
    Cell Microbiol 9:2658-66. 2007
    ..Changes in the tc insecticidal genes do not appear to have been responsible, but may have had other effects on Yersinia-flea interactions...
  4. pmc Characterization of late acyltransferase genes of Yersinia pestis and their role in temperature-dependent lipid A variation
    Roberto Rebeil
    Laboratory of Human Bacterial Pathogenesis, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 903 S 4th St, Hamilton, Montana 59840, USA
    J Bacteriol 188:1381-8. 2006
    ..This mutant was able to infect and block fleas as well as the parental wild-type strain, indicating that the low-temperature-dependent change to hexa-acylated lipid A synthesis is not required for survival in the flea gut...
  5. pmc Loss of a biofilm-inhibiting glycosyl hydrolase during the emergence of Yersinia pestis
    David L Erickson
    Laboratory of Zoonotic Pathogens, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, Montana 59840, USA
    J Bacteriol 190:8163-70. 2008
    ..pestis to produce biofilm in the flea foregut. Mutational loss of this glycosidase activity in Y. pestis may have contributed to the recent evolution of flea-borne transmission...
  6. pmc Transcriptomic and innate immune responses to Yersinia pestis in the lymph node during bubonic plague
    Jason E Comer
    Laboratory of Zoonotic Pathogens, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, Montana 59840, USA
    Infect Immun 78:5086-98. 2010
    ..Thus, the ability to counteract a PMN response in the lymph node appears to be a major in vivo function of the Y. pestis virulence plasmid...
  7. pmc Serotype differences and lack of biofilm formation characterize Yersinia pseudotuberculosis infection of the Xenopsylla cheopis flea vector of Yersinia pestis
    David L Erickson
    Laboratory of Zoonotic Pathogens, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, 903 South 4th St, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA
    J Bacteriol 188:1113-9. 2006
    ..pseudotuberculosis progenitor of Y. pestis extended its pre-existing ex vivo biofilm-forming ability to the flea gut environment, thus enabling proventricular blockage and efficient flea-borne transmission...
  8. pmc Role of the Yersinia pestis Ail protein in preventing a protective polymorphonuclear leukocyte response during bubonic plague
    B Joseph Hinnebusch
    Laboratory of Zoonotic Pathogens, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, Montana 59840, USA
    Infect Immun 79:4984-9. 2011
    ..pestis F1 antigen. The Y. pestis Ail protein is an important bubonic plague virulence factor that inhibits the innate immune response, in particular the recruitment of a protective PMN response to the infected lymph node...
  9. pmc Transit through the flea vector induces a pretransmission innate immunity resistance phenotype in Yersinia pestis
    Viveka Vadyvaloo
    Laboratory of Zoonotic Pathogens, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, Montana, United States of America
    PLoS Pathog 6:e1000783. 2010
    ..Our results suggest that transit through the flea vector induces a phenotype that enhances survival and dissemination of Y. pestis after transmission to the mammalian host...
  10. pmc Induction of the Yersinia pestis PhoP-PhoQ regulatory system in the flea and its role in producing a transmissible infection
    Roberto Rebeil
    Laboratory of Zoonotic Pathogens, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, Montana, USA
    J Bacteriol 195:1920-30. 2013
    ..In addition to enhancing transmissibility, induction of the PhoP-PhoQ system in the arthropod vector prior to transmission may preadapt Y. pestis to resist the initial encounter with the mammalian innate immune response...
  11. pmc Role of the Yersinia pestis plasminogen activator in the incidence of distinct septicemic and bubonic forms of flea-borne plague
    Florent Sebbane
    Laboratory of Zoonotic Pathogens and Veterinary Branch, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:5526-30. 2006
    ..Subsequent acquisition of the plasminogen activator gene by horizontal transfer enabled the bubonic form of disease and increased the potential for epidemic spread...
  12. pmc Yersinia pestis insecticidal-like toxin complex (Tc) family proteins: characterization of expression, subcellular localization, and potential role in infection of the flea vector
    Justin L Spinner
    Laboratory of Zoonotic Pathogens, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, NIAID, NIH, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA
    BMC Microbiol 12:296. 2012
    ..Previous microarray data indicate that the Tc genes are highly upregulated by Y. pestis while in the flea vector; however, their role in the infection of fleas and pathogenesis in the mammalian host is unclear...
  13. pmc Differential control of Yersinia pestis biofilm formation in vitro and in the flea vector by two c-di-GMP diguanylate cyclases
    Yi Cheng Sun
    Laboratory of Zoonotic Pathogens, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, Montana, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 6:e19267. 2011
    ..pestis, indicate that hmsT and y3730 are regulated post-transcriptionally to differentially control biofilm formation in vitro and in the flea vector, and identify a second c-di-GMP-regulated phenotype in Y. pestis...
  14. pmc Adaptive response of Yersinia pestis to extracellular effectors of innate immunity during bubonic plague
    Florent Sebbane
    Laboratory of Zoonotic Pathogens, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:11766-71. 2006
    ..High NO levels induced during plague may also influence the developing adaptive immune response and contribute to septic shock...
  15. ncbi request reprint The evolution of flea-borne transmission in Yersinia pestis
    B Joseph Hinnebusch
    Laboratory of Human Bacterial Pathogenesis, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA
    Curr Issues Mol Biol 7:197-212. 2005
    ..Perhaps reflective of the recent adaptation, transmission of Y. pestis by fleas is inefficient, and this likely imposed selective pressure favoring the evolution of increased virulence in this pathogen...
  16. pmc Kinetics of innate immune response to Yersinia pestis after intradermal infection in a mouse model
    Christopher F Bosio
    Laboratory of Zoonotic Pathogens, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, Montana, USA
    Infect Immun 80:4034-45. 2012
    ..Thus, an important feature of Y. pestis infection is reduced activation and organization of inflammatory cells that is at least partially dependent on the pYV virulence plasmid...
  17. ncbi request reprint Transmission of Yersinia pestis from an infectious biofilm in the flea vector
    Clayton O Jarrett
    Laboratory of Human Bacterial Pathogenesis, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, Montana 59840, USA
    J Infect Dis 190:783-92. 2004
    ..pestis. Enabling arthropod-borne transmission represents a novel function of a bacterial biofilm...
  18. ncbi request reprint Examining the vector-host-pathogen interface with quantitative molecular tools
    Jason E Comer
    Plague Section, Laboratory of Zoonotic Pathogens, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, MT, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 431:123-31. 2008
    ..The methods were applied to studies of transmission of Y. pestis by the rat flea Xenopsylla cheopis, but should be generally useful to investigate the transmission dynamics of any arthropod-borne disease...
  19. pmc Kinetics of disease progression and host response in a rat model of bubonic plague
    Florent Sebbane
    Laboratory of Human Bacterial Pathogenesis, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, Montana 59840, USA
    Am J Pathol 166:1427-39. 2005
    ..Understanding disease progression in this rat infection model should facilitate further investigations into the molecular pathogenesis of bubonic plague and the immune response to Y. pestis at different stages of the disease...
  20. ncbi request reprint Role of Yersinia murine toxin in survival of Yersinia pestis in the midgut of the flea vector
    B Joseph Hinnebusch
    Laboratory of Human Bacterial Pathogenesis, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA
    Science 296:733-5. 2002
    ..pestis from a cytotoxic digestion product of blood plasma in the flea gut. By enabling colonization of the flea midgut, acquisition of this PLD may have precipitated the transition of Y. pestis to obligate arthropod-borne transmission...
  21. ncbi request reprint Transmission factors: Yersinia pestis genes required to infect the flea vector of plague
    B Joseph Hinnebusch
    Laboratory of Human Bacterial Pathogenesis, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA
    Adv Exp Med Biol 529:55-62. 2003
  22. pmc Evaluation of the role of constitutive isocitrate lyase activity in Yersinia pestis infection of the flea vector and mammalian host
    Florent Sebbane
    Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases NIH, 903 S 4th St, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA
    Infect Immun 72:7334-7. 2004
    ..Thus, deregulation of the glyoxylate pathway does not underlie the recent adaptation of Y. pestis to arthropod-borne transmission...
  23. pmc Flea-borne transmission model to evaluate vaccine efficacy against naturally acquired bubonic plague
    Clayton O Jarrett
    Laboratory of Human Bacterial Pathogenesis, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, Montana 59840, USA
    Infect Immun 72:2052-6. 2004
    ..The model provides a means to directly assess the efficacy of new vaccines to prevent naturally acquired bubonic plague and to study events at the vector-host interface that lead to dissemination and disease...
  24. ncbi request reprint Analysis of Yersinia pestis gene expression in the flea vector
    Viveka Vadyvaloo
    Laboratory of Zoonotic Pathogens, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institutes of Health, USA
    Adv Exp Med Biol 603:192-200. 2007
    ..This article serves as a review of known factors involved in flea-borne transmission and introduces an 'in vivo' microarray approach to elucidating the genetic basis of Y. pestis infection of- and transmission by the flea...
  25. pmc Yersinia--flea interactions and the evolution of the arthropod-borne transmission route of plague
    Iman Chouikha
    Laboratory of Zoonotic Pathogens, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA
    Curr Opin Microbiol 15:239-46. 2012
    ..pseudotuberculosis progenitor included loss of insecticidal activity, increased resistance to antibacterial factors in the flea midgut, and extending Yersinia biofilm-forming ability to the flea host environment...
  26. pmc An insight into the sialome of the oriental rat flea, Xenopsylla cheopis (Rots)
    John F Andersen
    Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    BMC Genomics 8:102. 2007
    ..Fleas represent a relatively recent group of insects that evolved hematophagy independently of other insect orders...
  27. ncbi request reprint Variation in lipid A structure in the pathogenic yersiniae
    Roberto Rebeil
    Laboratory of Human Bacterial Pathogenesis, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 903 S 4th St, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA
    Mol Microbiol 52:1363-73. 2004
    ....
  28. ncbi request reprint A plague upon the phagocytes
    Frank R Deleo
    Nat Med 11:927-8. 2005
  29. pmc Experimental evidence for negative selection in the evolution of a Yersinia pestis pseudogene
    Yi Cheng Sun
    Program in Microbial Pathogenesis, Department of Cell and Tissue Biology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:8097-101. 2008
    ..The conversion of rcsA to a pseudogene during Y. pestis evolution, therefore, was a case of negative selection rather than neutral genetic drift...
  30. pmc Identification of gmhA, a Yersinia pestis gene required for flea blockage, by using a Caenorhabditis elegans biofilm system
    Creg Darby
    Department of Microbiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue S, BBRB Box 19, Birmingham, AL 35294 2170, USA
    Infect Immun 73:7236-42. 2005
    ..elegans biofilm formation and for flea blockage but only moderately defective in an in vitro biofilm assay. These results validate use of the C. elegans biofilm system to identify genes and pathways involved in Y. pestis flea blockage...
  31. pmc Resistance of Yersinia pestis to complement-dependent killing is mediated by the Ail outer membrane protein
    Sara Schesser Bartra
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33101, USA
    Infect Immun 76:612-22. 2008
    ..A Y. pestis ail deletion mutant was rapidly killed by sera obtained from all mammals tested except mouse serum. The role of Ail in infection of mice, Caenorhabditis elegans, and fleas was investigated...
  32. pmc Depolymerization of beta-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine disrupts the integrity of diverse bacterial biofilms
    Yoshikane Itoh
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Emory University School of Medicine, 3105 Rollins Research Center, 1510 Clifton Rd N E, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
    J Bacteriol 187:382-7. 2005
    ....
  33. pmc Human dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-grabbing nonintegrin (CD209) is a receptor for Yersinia pestis that promotes phagocytosis by dendritic cells
    Pei Zhang
    Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago UIC, 1601 Parkview Avenue, Rockford, IL 61107, USA
    Infect Immun 76:2070-9. 2008
    ..pestis and human DCs can be reduced by a combination treatment with anti-CD209 and anti-CD207 antibodies. This study shows that human DC-SIGN is a receptor for Y. pestis that promotes phagocytosis by DCs in vitro...
  34. ncbi request reprint Oral vaccination with salmonella simultaneously expressing Yersinia pestis F1 and V antigens protects against bubonic and pneumonic plague
    Xinghong Yang
    Veterinary Molecular Biology, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717, USA
    J Immunol 178:1059-67. 2007
    ..pestis. These results show that a single Salmonella vaccine can deliver both F1- and V-Ags to effect both systemic and mucosal immune protection against Y. pestis...