Amanda J Cross

Summary

Affiliation: National Institutes of Health
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Meat-related mutagens/carcinogens in the etiology of colorectal cancer
    Amanda J Cross
    Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland 20852, USA
    Environ Mol Mutagen 44:44-55. 2004
  2. pmc A prospective study of red and processed meat intake in relation to cancer risk
    Amanda J Cross
    Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland, United States of America
    PLoS Med 4:e325. 2007
  3. pmc A large prospective study of risk factors for adenocarcinomas and malignant carcinoid tumors of the small intestine
    Amanda J Cross
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics DCEG, Department of Health and Human Services DHHS, National Cancer Institute NCI, National Institutes of Health NIH, 6120 Executive Blvd, Rockville, MD 20852, USA
    Cancer Causes Control 24:1737-46. 2013
  4. pmc Iron homeostasis and distal colorectal adenoma risk in the prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer screening trial
    Amanda J Cross
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, MD 20852, USA
    Cancer Prev Res (Phila) 4:1465-75. 2011
  5. ncbi request reprint The role of dietary factors in the epidemiology of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma
    Amanda J Cross
    Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD 20852, USA
    Leuk Lymphoma 47:2477-87. 2006
  6. pmc Urinary biomarkers of meat consumption
    Amanda J Cross
    Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland 20852, USA
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 20:1107-11. 2011
  7. pmc A large prospective study of meat consumption and colorectal cancer risk: an investigation of potential mechanisms underlying this association
    Amanda J Cross
    Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Biostatistics Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Department of Health and Human Services, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Rockville, Maryland, USA
    Cancer Res 70:2406-14. 2010
  8. ncbi request reprint Iron and colorectal cancer risk in the alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene cancer prevention study
    Amanda J Cross
    Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Rockville, MD, USA
    Int J Cancer 118:3147-52. 2006
  9. ncbi request reprint A prospective study of meat and meat mutagens and prostate cancer risk
    Amanda J Cross
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    Cancer Res 65:11779-84. 2005
  10. pmc A prospective study of meat and fat intake in relation to small intestinal cancer
    Amanda J Cross
    Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland 20852, USA
    Cancer Res 68:9274-9. 2008

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications72

  1. ncbi request reprint Meat-related mutagens/carcinogens in the etiology of colorectal cancer
    Amanda J Cross
    Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland 20852, USA
    Environ Mol Mutagen 44:44-55. 2004
    ..Here, we review the current epidemiologic knowledge of meat-related mutagens, and evaluate the types of studies that may be required in the future to clarify the association between meat consumption and colorectal cancer...
  2. pmc A prospective study of red and processed meat intake in relation to cancer risk
    Amanda J Cross
    Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland, United States of America
    PLoS Med 4:e325. 2007
    ..We investigated whether red or processed meat intake increases cancer risk at a variety of sites...
  3. pmc A large prospective study of risk factors for adenocarcinomas and malignant carcinoid tumors of the small intestine
    Amanda J Cross
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics DCEG, Department of Health and Human Services DHHS, National Cancer Institute NCI, National Institutes of Health NIH, 6120 Executive Blvd, Rockville, MD 20852, USA
    Cancer Causes Control 24:1737-46. 2013
    ..Small intestinal cancer is increasing in the U.S.A, yet little is known about its etiology. Our aim was to prospectively evaluate risk factors for this malignancy by the two main histologic subtypes (adenocarcinomas and carcinoids)...
  4. pmc Iron homeostasis and distal colorectal adenoma risk in the prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer screening trial
    Amanda J Cross
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, MD 20852, USA
    Cancer Prev Res (Phila) 4:1465-75. 2011
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint The role of dietary factors in the epidemiology of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma
    Amanda J Cross
    Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD 20852, USA
    Leuk Lymphoma 47:2477-87. 2006
    ....
  6. pmc Urinary biomarkers of meat consumption
    Amanda J Cross
    Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland 20852, USA
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 20:1107-11. 2011
    ..One method to circumvent such errors is the use of biomarkers of dietary intake, but currently there are no accepted biomarkers for meat intake...
  7. pmc A large prospective study of meat consumption and colorectal cancer risk: an investigation of potential mechanisms underlying this association
    Amanda J Cross
    Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Biostatistics Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Department of Health and Human Services, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Rockville, Maryland, USA
    Cancer Res 70:2406-14. 2010
    ..In conclusion, we found a positive association for red and processed meat intake and colorectal cancer; heme iron, nitrate/nitrite, and heterocyclic amines from meat may explain these associations...
  8. ncbi request reprint Iron and colorectal cancer risk in the alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene cancer prevention study
    Amanda J Cross
    Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Rockville, MD, USA
    Int J Cancer 118:3147-52. 2006
    ..7, 95% CI = 1.4-15.1, p trend = 0.009). In summary, we found a significant inverse association between several serum iron indices and colon cancer risk...
  9. ncbi request reprint A prospective study of meat and meat mutagens and prostate cancer risk
    Amanda J Cross
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    Cancer Res 65:11779-84. 2005
    ..01-1.61). In conclusion, very well done meat was positively associated with prostate cancer risk. In addition, this study lends epidemiologic support to the animal studies, which have implicated PhIP as a prostate carcinogen...
  10. pmc A prospective study of meat and fat intake in relation to small intestinal cancer
    Amanda J Cross
    Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland 20852, USA
    Cancer Res 68:9274-9. 2008
    ..72; 95% CI, 1.79-7.74 for each 10-g increase in intake per 1,000 kcal). Our findings suggest that the positive associations for meat intake reported in previous case-control studies may partly be explained by saturated fat intake...
  11. pmc Meat consumption and risk of esophageal and gastric cancer in a large prospective study
    Amanda J Cross
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland 20852, USA
    Am J Gastroenterol 106:432-42. 2011
    ..Although there have been multiple studies of meat and colorectal cancer, other gastrointestinal malignancies are understudied...
  12. ncbi request reprint Meat and meat-mutagen intake and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma: results from a NCI-SEER case-control study
    Amanda J Cross
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Rockville, MD 20892, USA
    Carcinogenesis 27:293-7. 2006
    ..39 (0.22-0.70); P trend = 0.004]. Overall, our study suggests that consumption of meat, whether or not it is well-done, does not increase the risk of NHL. Furthermore, neither HCAs nor B[a]P from meat increase the risk of NHL...
  13. pmc Dietary meat intake in relation to colorectal adenoma in asymptomatic women
    Leah M Ferrucci
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    Am J Gastroenterol 104:1231-40. 2009
    ....
  14. pmc Adolescent and mid-life diet: risk of colorectal cancer in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study
    Elizabeth H Ruder
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, MD, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 94:1607-19. 2011
    ..Colorectal cancer has a natural history of several decades; therefore, the diet consumed decades before diagnosis may aid in understanding this malignancy...
  15. pmc A prospective study of meat, cooking methods, meat mutagens, heme iron, and lung cancer risks
    Natasa Tasevska
    Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD 20892 7242, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 89:1884-94. 2009
    ..Red and processed meat consumption may play a role in lung cancer pathogenesis because of these meats' fat and carcinogen content...
  16. pmc Interleukin-6 as a potential indicator for prevention of high-risk adenoma recurrence by dietary flavonols in the polyp prevention trial
    Gerd Bobe
    Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    Cancer Prev Res (Phila) 3:764-75. 2010
    ..Our results suggest that serum IL-6 may serve as a risk indicator and as a response indicator to dietary flavonols for colorectal cancer prevention...
  17. pmc Association of meat and fat intake with liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma in the NIH-AARP cohort
    Neal D Freedman
    Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, 6120 Executive Blvd, Rockville, MD 20852, USA
    J Natl Cancer Inst 102:1354-65. 2010
    ..Several plausible mechanisms, including fat, iron, heterocyclic amines, and N-nitroso compounds, link meat intake with chronic liver disease (CLD) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Few studies have investigated these associations...
  18. pmc Dietary fatty acids and pancreatic cancer in the NIH-AARP diet and health study
    Anne C M Thiebaut
    Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD, USA
    J Natl Cancer Inst 101:1001-11. 2009
    ..Previous research relating dietary fat, a modifiable risk factor, to pancreatic cancer has been inconclusive...
  19. pmc Pancreatic cancer and exposure to dietary nitrate and nitrite in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study
    Briseis Aschebrook-Kilfoy
    Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland 20892, USA
    Am J Epidemiol 174:305-15. 2011
    ..These results provide modest evidence that processed meat sources of dietary nitrate and nitrite may be associated with pancreatic cancer among men and provide no support for the hypothesis in women...
  20. pmc Caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and tea intakes and risk of colorectal cancer in a large prospective study
    Rashmi Sinha
    Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, MD, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 96:374-81. 2012
    ..Epidemiologic data for coffee and tea intakes in relation to colorectal cancer remain unclear. Despite differences in gut physiology, few studies have conducted investigations by anatomic subsites...
  21. pmc Meat intake is not associated with risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in a large prospective cohort of U.S. men and women
    Carrie R Daniel
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, MD, USA
    J Nutr 142:1074-80. 2012
    ..In this large U.S. cohort, meat intake was not associated with NHL or any histologic subtypes of NHL. Contrary to findings in animal models and other cancer sites, meat-cooking and -processing compounds did not increase NHL risk...
  22. pmc Xenobiotic metabolizing gene variants, dietary heterocyclic amine intake, and risk of prostate cancer
    Stella Koutros
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland 20852, USA
    Cancer Res 69:1877-84. 2009
    ..The observed effect provides evidence to support the hypothesis that HCAs may act as promoters of malignant transformation by altering mitogenic signaling...
  23. pmc Hyperplastic polyps and the risk of adenoma recurrence in the polyp prevention trial
    Adeyinka O Laiyemo
    Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program, Office of Preventive Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 7:192-7. 2009
    ..Prospective information on the risk of adenoma recurrence associated with hyperplastic polyps is limited. We sought to investigate whether the coexistence of hyperplastic polyps with adenomas increases the risk of adenoma recurrence...
  24. pmc Prospective study of dietary fiber, whole grain foods, and small intestinal cancer
    Arthur Schatzkin
    Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20852, USA
    Gastroenterology 135:1163-7. 2008
    ..We conducted a prospective cohort study to determine the relationship between intake of dietary fiber/whole grains and the incidence of small intestinal cancer...
  25. pmc Meat-related compounds and colorectal cancer risk by anatomical subsite
    Paige E Miller
    Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    Nutr Cancer 65:202-26. 2013
    ..05). HCAs, PAHs, nitrites, and nitrates may be involved in colorectal cancer etiology. Further examination into the unexpected inverse associations between poultry and colorectal cancer is warranted...
  26. pmc Dietary lignan and proanthocyanidin consumption and colorectal adenoma recurrence in the Polyp Prevention Trial
    Gerd Bobe
    Laboratory of Cancer Prevention, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute NCI, National Institutes of Health NIH, Department of Health and Human Services DHHS, Frederick, MD, USA
    Int J Cancer 130:1649-59. 2012
    ..04). To conclude, dietary lignan and proanthocyanidin consumption were not generally related to colorectal adenoma recurrence; however, high lignan intake may increase the risk of adenoma recurrence in women...
  27. pmc Large prospective investigation of meat intake, related mutagens, and risk of renal cell carcinoma
    Carrie R Daniel
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, MD, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 95:155-62. 2012
    ..The evidence for meat intake and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) risk is inconsistent. Mutagens related to meat cooking and processing, and variation by RCC subtype may be important to consider...
  28. ncbi request reprint Meat, meat cooking methods and preservation, and risk for colorectal adenoma
    Rashmi Sinha
    Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    Cancer Res 65:8034-41. 2005
    ..04; 95% CI, 0.90-1.19). Our study of screening-detected colorectal adenomas shows that red meat and meat cooked at high temperatures are associated with an increased risk of colorectal adenoma...
  29. pmc Serum adiponectin, leptin, C-peptide, homocysteine, and colorectal adenoma recurrence in the Polyp Prevention Trial
    Gerd Bobe
    Laboratory of Cancer Prevention, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute NCI, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 19:1441-52. 2010
    ..Serum adiponectin, leptin, C-peptide, and homocysteine are indicators for obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and chronic inflammation, which have all been associated with colorectal cancer...
  30. pmc Sugars in diet and risk of cancer in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study
    Natasa Tasevska
    Applied Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892 7242, USA
    Int J Cancer 130:159-69. 2012
    ..Measurement error in FFQ-reported dietary sugars may have limited our ability to obtain more conclusive findings. Statistically significant associations observed for the rare cancers are of interest and warrant further investigation...
  31. pmc Comparison of 4 established DASH diet indexes: examining associations of index scores and colorectal cancer
    Paige E Miller
    Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 98:794-803. 2013
    ..Multiple diet indexes have been developed to capture the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) dietary pattern and examine relations with health outcomes but have not been compared within the same study population to our knowledge...
  32. pmc Utilization and yield of surveillance colonoscopy in the continued follow-up study of the polyp prevention trial
    Adeyinka O Laiyemo
    Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program, Office of Preventive Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 7:562-7; quiz 497. 2009
    ..We examined the use and yield of surveillance colonoscopy among participants in the Polyp Prevention Trial (PPT) after the 4-year dietary intervention trial ended...
  33. pmc Meat-related mutagen exposure, xenobiotic metabolizing gene polymorphisms and the risk of advanced colorectal adenoma and cancer
    Anne M J Gilsing
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services Bethesda, MD, USA
    Carcinogenesis 33:1332-9. 2012
    ..This large and comprehensive study of XME genes, meat mutagens and the risk of colorectal tumours found that a NAT1 polymorphism modified the association between MeIQx intake and colorectal adenoma risk...
  34. pmc Heme iron from meat and risk of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and stomach
    Mary H Ward
    Department of Health and Human Services, Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 7240, USA
    Eur J Cancer Prev 21:134-8. 2012
    ..Our results suggest that high intakes of heme and iron from meat may be important dietary risk factors for esophageal and stomach cancer and may partly explain associations with red meat...
  35. pmc Dietary fiber and grain consumption in relation to head and neck cancer in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study
    Tram Kim Lam
    Genetic Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD 20852, USA
    Cancer Causes Control 22:1405-14. 2011
    ..Dietary fiber and grain consumption may reduce the risk of head and neck cancer; however, the epidemiological evidence is limited. We investigated this relationship in the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-AARP Diet and Health Study...
  36. pmc Epithelial ovarian cancer and exposure to dietary nitrate and nitrite in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study
    Briseis Aschebrook-Kilfoy
    Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch, DCEG, NCI, NIH, Rockville, Maryland 20852, USA
    Eur J Cancer Prev 21:65-72. 2012
    ..There were no clear differences in risk by histologic subtype of ovarian cancer. Our findings suggest that a role of dietary nitrate and nitrite in ovarian cancer risk should be followed in other large cohort studies...
  37. pmc Dopamine D2 receptor polymorphisms and adenoma recurrence in the Polyp Prevention Trial
    Gwen Murphy
    Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program, Office of Preventive Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Int J Cancer 124:2148-51. 2009
    ..Increased risk of adenoma recurrence as conferred by DRD2 genotypes may be related to difference in alcohol and fat intake across genotypes...
  38. pmc Do interleukin polymorphisms play a role in the prevention of colorectal adenoma recurrence by dietary flavonols?
    Gerd Bobe
    Laboratory of Cancer Prevention, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Eur J Cancer Prev 20:86-95. 2011
    ..In conclusion, our results suggest that IL SNPs, in combination with a flavonol-rich diet or decreased serum IL, may lower the risk of adenoma recurrence...
  39. pmc Meat and meat mutagens and risk of prostate cancer in the Agricultural Health Study
    Stella Koutros
    Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, 6120 Executive Boulevard, EPS 8111, Rockville, MD 20852, USA
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 17:80-7. 2008
    ..96-1.59) and 1.20 (95% CI, 0.93-1.55), respectively] when the highest quintile was compared with the lowest. In conclusion, well and very well done meat was associated with an increased risk for prostate cancer in this cohort...
  40. pmc Intakes of red meat, processed meat, and meat mutagens increase lung cancer risk
    Tram Kim Lam
    Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program, Office of Preventive Oncology, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, corrected Bethesda, Maryland 20892 7236, USA
    Cancer Res 69:932-9. 2009
    ..In summary, red meat, processed meat, and meat mutagens were independently associated with increased risk of lung cancer...
  41. pmc Iron in relation to gastric cancer in the Alpha-tocopherol, Beta-carotene Cancer Prevention Study
    Michael B Cook
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, 6120 Executive Blvd, EPS Suite 550 Room 5014, Bethesda, MD 20852 7234, USA
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 21:2033-42. 2012
    ..We used the prospective Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene (ATBC) Cancer Prevention Study to assess whether iron metrics were associated with gastric cardia cancer (GCC) and gastric noncardia cancer (GNCC)...
  42. pmc Socioeconomic deprivation impact on meat intake and mortality: NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study
    Jacqueline M Major
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, 6120 Executive Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20852, USA
    Cancer Causes Control 22:1699-707. 2011
    ..This study examined the impact of area socioeconomic deprivation on the association between meat intake and all-cause and cause-specific mortality after accounting for individual-level risk factors...
  43. pmc Etiologic heterogeneity among non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes
    Lindsay M Morton
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute NCI, National Institutes of Health NIH, Rockville, MD, USA
    Blood 112:5150-60. 2008
    ....
  44. pmc Meat and meat-related compounds and risk of prostate cancer in a large prospective cohort study in the United States
    Rashmi Sinha
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Am J Epidemiol 170:1165-77. 2009
    ..There were no clear associations for fatal prostate cancer. Red and processed meat may be positively associated with prostate cancer via mechanisms involving heme iron, nitrite/nitrate, grilling/barbecuing, and benzo[a]pyrene...
  45. pmc No effect of meat, meat cooking preferences, meat mutagens or heme iron on lung cancer risk in the prostate, lung, colorectal and ovarian cancer screening trial
    Natasa Tasevska
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, MD, USA
    Int J Cancer 128:402-11. 2011
    ..In this population, we found no association between meat type, cooking method, doneness level or intake of specific meat mutagens or heme iron and lung cancer risk...
  46. pmc Meat and components of meat and the risk of bladder cancer in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study
    Leah M Ferrucci
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland, USA
    Cancer 116:4345-53. 2010
    ..The authors comprehensively investigated the association between meat and meat components and bladder cancer...
  47. pmc Adiposity in relation to colorectal adenomas and hyperplastic polyps in women
    Michael F Leitzmann
    The Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, 6120 Executive Blvd, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Cancer Causes Control 20:1497-507. 2009
    ..To examine whether BMI is independently related to colorectal adenomas and hyperplastic polyps...
  48. pmc Prospective investigation of poultry and fish intake in relation to cancer risk
    Carrie R Daniel
    Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, 6120 Executive Blvd, Suite 320, Rockville, MD 20852, USA
    Cancer Prev Res (Phila) 4:1903-11. 2011
    ..Simply increasing fish or poultry intake, without reducing red meat intake, may be less beneficial for cancer prevention...
  49. pmc Patterns of meat intake and risk of prostate cancer among African-Americans in a large prospective study
    Jacqueline M Major
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, 6120 Executive Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20852, USA
    Cancer Causes Control 22:1691-8. 2011
    ..The purpose of this study was to examine the association between type of meat intake and prostate cancer risk among African-American men...
  50. ncbi request reprint Meat and meat-mutagen intake and pancreatic cancer risk in the NIH-AARP cohort
    Rachael Z Stolzenberg-Solomon
    National Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health Human Services, Rockville, MD 20852, USA
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 16:2664-75. 2007
    ..006) increased risk in men and women combined. These findings support the hypothesis that meat intake, particularly meat cooked at high temperatures and associated mutagens, may play a role in pancreatic cancer development...
  51. ncbi request reprint Postpolypectomy colonoscopy surveillance guidelines: predictive accuracy for advanced adenoma at 4 years
    Adeyinka O Laiyemo
    Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program, Biometry Research Group, Divisionof Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Ann Intern Med 148:419-26. 2008
    ..Lack of confidence in postpolypectomy surveillance guidelines may be a factor in the observed low adherence rates among providers...
  52. pmc Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colorectal cancer risk in a large, prospective cohort
    Elizabeth H Ruder
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland, USA
    Am J Gastroenterol 106:1340-50. 2011
    ..We investigated NSAID use and colorectal adenocarcinoma by subsite, and among individuals with a family history of colon cancer in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study...
  53. ncbi request reprint Processed meat intake, CYP2A6 activity and risk of colorectal adenoma
    Mary H Ward
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892 7240, USA
    Carcinogenesis 28:1210-6. 2007
    ..Our results suggest that nitrite and nitrate intake from processed meat intake increases the risk of colorectal adenoma after accounting for HCA and PAH...
  54. ncbi request reprint A prospective study of serum C-reactive protein and colorectal cancer risk in men
    Marc J Gunter
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland 20852, USA
    Cancer Res 66:2483-7. 2006
    ..018). These results support the notion that chronic low-grade inflammation is a marker for increased risk of colorectal cancer...
  55. pmc Genomic methylation of leukocyte DNA in relation to colorectal adenoma among asymptomatic women
    Unhee Lim
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Rockville, Maryland, USA
    Gastroenterology 134:47-55. 2008
    ..We examined genomic methylation of leukocyte DNA in relation to colorectal adenoma (CRA) among asymptomatic women (40-79 years of age) participating in a multicenter colonoscopy screening study (CONCeRN Study, 2000-2002)...
  56. pmc Sex disparities in colorectal cancer incidence by anatomic subsite, race and age
    Gwen Murphy
    Department of Health and Human Services, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
    Int J Cancer 128:1668-75. 2011
    ..These findings may partially reflect differences in screening experiences and access to medical care but also suggest that etiologic factors may be playing a role...
  57. pmc Meat intake and mortality: a prospective study of over half a million people
    Rashmi Sinha
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Rockville, MD 20852, USA
    Arch Intern Med 169:562-71. 2009
    ..High intakes of red or processed meat may increase the risk of mortality. Our objective was to determine the relations of red, white, and processed meat intakes to risk for total and cause-specific mortality...
  58. doi request reprint Association of dietary and supplemental iron and colorectal cancer in a population-based study
    Joseph H Ashmore
    aDepartment of Nutritional Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park bNortheast Regional Cancer Institute, Scranton Departments of cPublic Health Sciences dPharmacology, Pennsylvania State College of Medicine, Hershey eDepartment of Medicine, Lehigh Valley Hospital, Allentown, Pennsylvania fDepartment of Health Sciences, Exponent Inc, Chicago, Illinois gDepartment of Health and Human Services, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    Eur J Cancer Prev 22:506-11. 2013
    ..001), an effect that was observed in both men (OR=2.56; 95% CI=1.30-5.05) and women (OR=2.46; 95% CI=1.34-4.52). These findings suggest that consumption of more than 18 mg/day of supplemental iron may increase risk for CRC. ..
  59. doi request reprint Use of the predictive sugars biomarker to evaluate self-reported total sugars intake in the Observing Protein and Energy Nutrition (OPEN) study
    Natasa Tasevska
    Applied Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, Nutritional Epidemiology, Branch, National Cancer Institute, 6130 Executive Blvd, EPN 3121, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 20:490-500. 2011
    ..A predictive biomarker for intake of total sugars was recently developed under controlled conditions. We used this biomarker to assess measurement error (ME) structure in self-reported intake of total sugars in free-living individuals...
  60. doi request reprint Folate and MTHFR: risk of adenoma recurrence in the Polyp Prevention Trial
    Gwen Murphy
    Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program, Office of Preventive Oncology, Bethesda, MD, USA
    Cancer Causes Control 19:751-8. 2008
    ..A C/T transition at position 677 in the gene encoding methlylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T) has been reported to interact with folate intake to modulate colorectal adenoma recurrence or cancer risk...
  61. pmc Mendelian randomization: how it can--and cannot--help confirm causal relations between nutrition and cancer
    Arthur Schatzkin
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland, USA
    Cancer Prev Res (Phila) 2:104-13. 2009
    ..We conclude that Mendelian randomization is not universally applicable, but, under the right conditions, can complement evidence for causal associations from conventional epidemiologic studies...
  62. pmc Dietary factors and risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and small lymphocytic lymphoma: a pooled analysis of two prospective studies
    Huei Ting Tsai
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 19:2680-4. 2010
    ..Very few studies have investigated diet in relation to these leukemias, and no consistent associations are known...
  63. pmc Trends in meat consumption in the USA
    Carrie R Daniel
    Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Department of Health and Human Services, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 6120 Executive Blvd, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Public Health Nutr 14:575-83. 2011
    ..To characterize the trends, distribution, potential determinants and public health implications of meat consumption within the USA...
  64. pmc Pooled analysis of genetic variation at chromosome 8q24 and colorectal neoplasia risk
    Sonja I Berndt
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892 7240, USA
    Hum Mol Genet 17:2665-72. 2008
    ..008. This study confirms the association between colorectal neoplasia and the 8q24 polymorphisms located between 128.47 and 128.54 Mb and suggests a role for these variants in the formation of multiple adenomas...
  65. pmc Dietary flavonoids and colorectal adenoma recurrence in the Polyp Prevention Trial
    Gerd Bobe
    Laboratory of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute Frederick, Room 110, Building 576, Frederick, MD 21702 1201, USA
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 17:1344-53. 2008
    ..Our data suggest that a flavonol-rich diet may decrease the risk of advanced adenoma recurrence...
  66. ncbi request reprint Diet and risk of multiple myeloma in Connecticut women
    H Dean Hosgood
    Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 7240, USA
    Cancer Causes Control 18:1065-76. 2007
    ....
  67. pmc Short- and long-term risk of colorectal adenoma recurrence among whites and blacks
    Adeyinka O Laiyemo
    Department of Medicine, Howard University Hospital, Washington, DC, USA
    Gastrointest Endosc 77:447-54. 2013
    ..It is unclear whether the higher burden from colorectal cancer among blacks is due to an increased biological susceptibility...
  68. ncbi request reprint Susceptibility of human metabolic phenotypes to dietary modulation
    Cinzia Stella
    Biomolecular Medicine, Division of Surgery, Oncology, Reproductive Biology and Anaesthetics SORA, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, and MRC Dunn Human Nutrition Unit, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    J Proteome Res 5:2780-8. 2006
    ..This work shows the potential for the routine use of metabonomics in nutritional and epidemiological studies, in characterizing and predicting the metabolic effects and the influence of diet on human metabotypes...
  69. pmc Pesticide use and colorectal cancer risk in the Agricultural Health Study
    Won Jin Lee
    Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul, Korea
    Int J Cancer 121:339-46. 2007
    ..Nonetheless the possibility of an association between exposure to certain pesticides and incidence of colorectal cancer among pesticide applicators deserves further evaluation...
  70. ncbi request reprint Red meat enhances the colonic formation of the DNA adduct O6-carboxymethyl guanine: implications for colorectal cancer risk
    Michelle H Lewin
    Diet and Cancer Group, Dunn Human Nutrition Unit, Wellcome Trust Medical Research Council Building, Cambridge CB2 2XY, United Kingdom
    Cancer Res 66:1859-65. 2006
    ..As these O(6)CMG adducts are not repaired, and if other related adducts are formed and not repaired, this may explain the association of red meat with colorectal cancer...
  71. ncbi request reprint Variability in fecal water genotoxicity, determined using the Comet assay, is independent of endogenous N-nitroso compound formation attributed to red meat consumption
    Amanda J Cross
    Medical Research Council Dunn Human Nutrition Unit, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    Environ Mol Mutagen 47:179-84. 2006
    ..0001). Failure to find dietary effects on fecal water genotoxicity may therefore be attributed to individual variability and low levels of ATNCs in fecal water samples...
  72. ncbi request reprint New marker of colon cancer risk associated with heme intake: 1,4-dihydroxynonane mercapturic acid
    Fabrice Pierre
    Ecole Nationale Veterinaire Toulouse, UMR INRA ENVT 1089 Xénobiotiques, Toulouse, France
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 15:2274-9. 2006
    ....