Sally A Amundson

Summary

Affiliation: National Institutes of Health
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Gene expression profiles for monitoring radiation exposure
    S A Amundson
    National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute Division of Basic Science Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Radiat Prot Dosimetry 97:11-6. 2001
  2. ncbi request reprint Biological indicators for the identification of ionizing radiation exposure in humans
    S A Amundson
    NIH, National Cancer Institute, 37 Convent Dr, Bldg 37, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Expert Rev Mol Diagn 1:211-9. 2001
  3. ncbi request reprint Functional genomics as a window on radiation stress signaling
    Sally A Amundson
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Oncogene 22:5828-33. 2003
  4. ncbi request reprint Monitoring human radiation exposure by gene expression profiling: possibilities and pitfalls
    Sally A Amundson
    National Cancer Institute, NIH, 37 Convent Drive, Bldg 37, Rm 6144, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Health Phys 85:36-42. 2003
  5. ncbi request reprint Stress-specific signatures: expression profiling of p53 wild-type and -null human cells
    Sally A Amundson
    Gene Response Section, Center for Cancer Research, NCI, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Oncogene 24:4572-9. 2005
  6. ncbi request reprint Functional genomics of UV radiation responses in human cells
    Christine A Koch-Paiz
    Gene Response Section, Center for Cancer Research, NCI, Bethesda, MD, USA
    Mutat Res 549:65-78. 2004
  7. ncbi request reprint Human in vivo radiation-induced biomarkers: gene expression changes in radiotherapy patients
    Sally A Amundson
    Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Cancer Res 64:6368-71. 2004
  8. ncbi request reprint Differential responses of stress genes to low dose-rate gamma irradiation
    Sally A Amundson
    Division of Basic Science, National Cancer Institute and National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Mol Cancer Res 1:445-52. 2003
  9. ncbi request reprint Microarray approaches for analysis of cell cycle regulatory genes
    Sally A Amundson
    Gene Response Section, Division of Basic Science, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 241:125-41. 2004
  10. ncbi request reprint Microarray approaches for analysis of tumor suppressor gene function
    Sally A Amundson
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 223:141-54. 2003

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications20

  1. ncbi request reprint Gene expression profiles for monitoring radiation exposure
    S A Amundson
    National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute Division of Basic Science Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Radiat Prot Dosimetry 97:11-6. 2001
    ..Although the preliminary data are encouraging, significant work remains before meaningful correlations with risk or practical assessment of exposure can be made by gene expression profiling...
  2. ncbi request reprint Biological indicators for the identification of ionizing radiation exposure in humans
    S A Amundson
    NIH, National Cancer Institute, 37 Convent Dr, Bldg 37, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Expert Rev Mol Diagn 1:211-9. 2001
    ..Developments in high-throughput gene expression profiling may enable future development of a rapid and noninvasive testing method for application to potentially exposed populations...
  3. ncbi request reprint Functional genomics as a window on radiation stress signaling
    Sally A Amundson
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Oncogene 22:5828-33. 2003
    ..Gene expression profiling, in particular shows great promise, both in terms of insight into basic molecular mechanisms and for the future hope of biomarker development and individual tailoring of cancer therapy...
  4. ncbi request reprint Monitoring human radiation exposure by gene expression profiling: possibilities and pitfalls
    Sally A Amundson
    National Cancer Institute, NIH, 37 Convent Drive, Bldg 37, Rm 6144, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Health Phys 85:36-42. 2003
    ..Although this technology holds great promise, some obstacles remain to be overcome before it can be successfully applied to population studies...
  5. ncbi request reprint Stress-specific signatures: expression profiling of p53 wild-type and -null human cells
    Sally A Amundson
    Gene Response Section, Center for Cancer Research, NCI, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Oncogene 24:4572-9. 2005
    ..A set of 16 genes did exhibit a robust p53-dependent pattern of induction in response to all nine DNA-damaging agents, however...
  6. ncbi request reprint Functional genomics of UV radiation responses in human cells
    Christine A Koch-Paiz
    Gene Response Section, Center for Cancer Research, NCI, Bethesda, MD, USA
    Mutat Res 549:65-78. 2004
    ..Our results with suramin demonstrate the power of cDNA microarray hybridization to illuminate the global effects of a pharmacologic inhibitor on cell signaling...
  7. ncbi request reprint Human in vivo radiation-induced biomarkers: gene expression changes in radiotherapy patients
    Sally A Amundson
    Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Cancer Res 64:6368-71. 2004
    ..Additional studies may reveal correlations between responses and either diagnosis or prognosis, and such in vivo validation marks an important step in the development of potentially informative radiation exposure biomarkers...
  8. ncbi request reprint Differential responses of stress genes to low dose-rate gamma irradiation
    Sally A Amundson
    Division of Basic Science, National Cancer Institute and National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Mol Cancer Res 1:445-52. 2003
    ....
  9. ncbi request reprint Microarray approaches for analysis of cell cycle regulatory genes
    Sally A Amundson
    Gene Response Section, Division of Basic Science, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 241:125-41. 2004
  10. ncbi request reprint Microarray approaches for analysis of tumor suppressor gene function
    Sally A Amundson
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA
    Methods Mol Biol 223:141-54. 2003
  11. ncbi request reprint Stress-gene induction by low-dose gamma irradiation
    Albert J Fornace
    National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Mil Med 167:13-5. 2002
    ..The expectation is that transcriptional stress responses will provide a molecular approach to monitoring for radiation exposure and detecting interindividual differences...
  12. ncbi request reprint Amplification of PPM1D in human tumors abrogates p53 tumor-suppressor activity
    Dmitry V Bulavin
    Gene Response Section, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
    Nat Genet 31:210-5. 2002
    ..These findings suggest that inactivation of the p38 MAPK through PPM1D overexpression resulting from PPM1D amplification contributes to the development of human cancers by suppressing p53 activation...
  13. ncbi request reprint p38 and Chk1 kinases: different conductors for the G(2)/M checkpoint symphony
    Dmitry V Bulavin
    Gene Response Section, Center for Cancer Research, NCI, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 4255, USA
    Curr Opin Genet Dev 12:92-7. 2002
    ..Our current model for G(2)/M checkpoint activation after genotoxic stress is discussed emphasizing the roles for Chk1 and p38 kinases in checkpoint regulation...
  14. pmc Development of gene expression signatures for practical radiation biodosimetry
    Sunirmal Paul
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 71:1236-1244. 2008
    ..This approach could provide both an estimate of physical radiation dose and an indication of the extent of individual injury or future risk...
  15. ncbi request reprint Functional genomics in radiation biology: a gateway to cellular systems-level studies
    Sally A Amundson
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, 630 W 168th St, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Radiat Environ Biophys 47:25-31. 2008
    ..The future development of "integromic" models of radiation response should add substantially to the understanding gained from gene expression studies alone...
  16. doi request reprint Integrating global gene expression and radiation survival parameters across the 60 cell lines of the National Cancer Institute Anticancer Drug Screen
    Sally A Amundson
    Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York 10032, USA
    Cancer Res 68:415-24. 2008
    ..The response of those genes to gamma-rays seems to be unaffected by the myriad of genetic differences across this diverse cell set; it represents the most penetrant gene expression response to ionizing radiation yet observed...
  17. doi request reprint Mechanism of radiation-induced bystander effects: a unifying model
    Tom K Hei
    Center for Radiological Research, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA
    J Pharm Pharmacol 60:943-50. 2008
    ....
  18. pmc Mechanism of radiation-induced bystander effect: role of the cyclooxygenase-2 signaling pathway
    Hongning Zhou
    Center for Radiological Research, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:14641-6. 2005
    ..These results provide evidence that the COX-2-related pathway, which is essential in mediating cellular inflammatory response, is the critical signaling link for the bystander phenomenon...
  19. ncbi request reprint ATF3 induction following DNA damage is regulated by distinct signaling pathways and over-expression of ATF3 protein suppresses cells growth
    Feiyue Fan
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania PA 15213, USA
    Oncogene 21:7488-96. 2002
    ..Interestingly, over-expression of ATF3 protein is able to slow down progression of cells from G1 to S phase, indicating that ATF3 protein might play a negative role in the control of cell cycle progression...
  20. doi request reprint NASA Radiation Biomarker Workshop, September 27-28, 2007
    Tore Straume
    NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California 94035, B Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA
    Radiat Res 170:393-405. 2008
    ..A summary of conclusions is provided at the end of the report...