Kurt Hugenberg

Summary

Affiliation: Miami University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint The categorization-individuation model: an integrative account of the other-race recognition deficit
    Kurt Hugenberg
    Psychology Department, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056, USA
    Psychol Rev 117:1168-87. 2010
  2. doi request reprint The look of fear and anger: facial maturity modulates recognition of fearful and angry expressions
    Donald F Sacco
    Department of Psychology, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056, USA
    Emotion 9:39-49. 2009
  3. ncbi request reprint Ambiguity in social categorization: The role of prejudice and facial affect in race categorization
    Kurt Hugenberg
    Northwestern University, USA
    Psychol Sci 15:342-5. 2004
  4. ncbi request reprint Social categorization and the perception of facial affect: target race moderates the response latency advantage for happy faces
    Kurt Hugenberg
    Department of Psychology, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056, USA
    Emotion 5:267-76. 2005
  5. ncbi request reprint Framing discrimination: effects of inclusion versus exclusion mind-sets on stereotypic judgments
    Kurt Hugenberg
    Department of Psychology, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 91:1020-31. 2006
  6. ncbi request reprint The cross-category effect: mere social categorization is sufficient to elicit an own-group bias in face recognition
    Michael J Bernstein
    Miami University, Oxford, OH, USA
    Psychol Sci 18:706-12. 2007
  7. ncbi request reprint Social exclusion and female mating behavior: rejected women show strategic enhancement of short-term mating interest
    Donald F Sacco
    Department of Psychology, Miami University, Oxford, OH, USA
    Evol Psychol 10:573-87. 2012
  8. doi request reprint Class, race, and the face: social context modulates the cross-race effect in face recognition
    Edwin R Shriver
    Psychology Department, Oxford, OH 45056, USA
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 34:260-74. 2008
  9. doi request reprint Mere social categorization modulates identification of facial expressions of emotion
    STEVEN G YOUNG
    Psychology Department, Miami University, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 99:964-77. 2010
  10. doi request reprint The self-regulation of automatic associations and behavioral impulses
    Jeffrey W Sherman
    Department of Psychology, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    Psychol Rev 115:314-35. 2008

Detail Information

Publications15

  1. doi request reprint The categorization-individuation model: an integrative account of the other-race recognition deficit
    Kurt Hugenberg
    Psychology Department, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056, USA
    Psychol Rev 117:1168-87. 2010
    ....
  2. doi request reprint The look of fear and anger: facial maturity modulates recognition of fearful and angry expressions
    Donald F Sacco
    Department of Psychology, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056, USA
    Emotion 9:39-49. 2009
    ..Results are discussed as representing a broad co-evolutionary relationship between facial maturity and fearful and angry facial expressions...
  3. ncbi request reprint Ambiguity in social categorization: The role of prejudice and facial affect in race categorization
    Kurt Hugenberg
    Northwestern University, USA
    Psychol Sci 15:342-5. 2004
    ..Implicit prejudice (but not explicit prejudice) was related to increased sensitivity to the targets' facial expressions, regardless of whether prejudice was measured after (Study 1) or before (Study 2) the race categorizations were made...
  4. ncbi request reprint Social categorization and the perception of facial affect: target race moderates the response latency advantage for happy faces
    Kurt Hugenberg
    Department of Psychology, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056, USA
    Emotion 5:267-76. 2005
    ..Thus, the race of a target face provides an evaluative context in which facial expressions are categorized...
  5. ncbi request reprint Framing discrimination: effects of inclusion versus exclusion mind-sets on stereotypic judgments
    Kurt Hugenberg
    Department of Psychology, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 91:1020-31. 2006
    ..R. Banaji & A. G. Greenwald, 1995). Thus, the strategy used during decision making can influence the final decision via 2 theoretically distinct stereotyping mechanisms...
  6. ncbi request reprint The cross-category effect: mere social categorization is sufficient to elicit an own-group bias in face recognition
    Michael J Bernstein
    Miami University, Oxford, OH, USA
    Psychol Sci 18:706-12. 2007
    ..These results suggest that social-cognitive mechanisms of in-group and out-group categorization are sufficient to elicit performance differences for in-group and out-group face recognition...
  7. ncbi request reprint Social exclusion and female mating behavior: rejected women show strategic enhancement of short-term mating interest
    Donald F Sacco
    Department of Psychology, Miami University, Oxford, OH, USA
    Evol Psychol 10:573-87. 2012
    ..Collectively, these results are consistent with a social exchange theory of women's sexual behavior following social exclusion...
  8. doi request reprint Class, race, and the face: social context modulates the cross-race effect in face recognition
    Edwin R Shriver
    Psychology Department, Oxford, OH 45056, USA
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 34:260-74. 2008
    ..In line with a social-cognitive model of the CRE, context had no influence on recognition for cross-race Black faces across the three experiments...
  9. doi request reprint Mere social categorization modulates identification of facial expressions of emotion
    STEVEN G YOUNG
    Psychology Department, Miami University, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 99:964-77. 2010
    ..Overall, the results point to distinct processing modes for ingroup and outgroup faces, resulting in differential identification accuracy for facial expressions of emotion...
  10. doi request reprint The self-regulation of automatic associations and behavioral impulses
    Jeffrey W Sherman
    Department of Psychology, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    Psychol Rev 115:314-35. 2008
    ..Applications of the model to empirical and theoretical concerns in a variety of areas of psychology are discussed...
  11. ncbi request reprint Facing prejudice: implicit prejudice and the perception of facial threat
    Kurt Hugenberg
    Northwestern University, USA
    Psychol Sci 14:640-3. 2003
    ....
  12. ncbi request reprint Separating multiple processes in implicit social cognition: the quad model of implicit task performance
    Frederica R Conrey
    Department of Psychology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 89:469-87. 2005
    ..The model is shown to provide a more nuanced and detailed understanding of the interplay of multiple processes in implicit task performance, including implicit measures of attitudes, prejudice, and stereotyping...
  13. doi request reprint Social inclusion facilitates risky mating behavior in men
    Donald F Sacco
    Department of Psychology, Psychology Building, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056, USA
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 37:985-98. 2011
    ..These results demonstrate that the experience of social inclusion can affect sex-differentiated preferences for risky mating strategies...
  14. ncbi request reprint Implicit theories about groups and stereotyping: the role of group entitativity
    Robert J Rydell
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Santa Barbara, 93106 9660, USA
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 33:549-58. 2007
    ..The roles of implicit theories about groups and perceptions of group entitativity are discussed regarding stereotyping...
  15. ncbi request reprint Applying the attractor field model to social cognition: Perceptual discrimination is facilitated, but memory is impaired for faces displaying evaluatively congruent expressions
    Olivier Corneille
    Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Psychology, Louvain la Neuve, Belgium
    J Pers Soc Psychol 93:335-52. 2007
    ..Consistent with the attractor field model, memory accuracy was better for faces displaying evaluatively incongruent expressions. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed...