STEPHEN DE HSU

Summary

Affiliation: Medical College of Georgia
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Effects of oral consumption of the green tea polyphenol EGCG in a murine model for human Sjogren's syndrome, an autoimmune disease
    Kevin Gillespie
    Department of Periodontology, US Army Fort Gordon, Fort Gordon, GA, USA
    Life Sci 83:581-8. 2008
  2. ncbi request reprint Chemopreventive effects of green tea polyphenols correlate with reversible induction of p57 expression
    S Hsu
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, School of Dentistry, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta 30912 1126, USA
    Anticancer Res 21:3743-8. 2001
  3. ncbi request reprint Green tea polyphenol induces caspase 14 in epidermal keratinocytes via MAPK pathways and reduces psoriasiform lesions in the flaky skin mouse model
    Stephen Hsu
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, School of Dentistry, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA 30912, USA
    Exp Dermatol 16:678-84. 2007
  4. ncbi request reprint Expression of caspase-14 reduces tumorigenicity of skin cancer cells
    Stephen Hsu
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, School of Dentistry, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, USA
    In Vivo 21:279-83. 2007
  5. ncbi request reprint Green tea polyphenols reduce autoimmune symptoms in a murine model for human Sjogren's syndrome and protect human salivary acinar cells from TNF-alpha-induced cytotoxicity
    Stephen D Hsu
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, School of Dentistry, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA, USA
    Autoimmunity 40:138-47. 2007
  6. ncbi request reprint A new approach to managing oral manifestations of Sjogren's syndrome and skin manifestations of lupus
    Stephen Hsu
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, School of Dentistry, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, USA
    J Biochem Mol Biol 39:229-39. 2006
  7. ncbi request reprint Inhibition of autoantigen expression by (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (the major constituent of green tea) in normal human cells
    Stephen Hsu
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, School of Dentistry, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, 30912 1126, USA
    J Pharmacol Exp Ther 315:805-11. 2005
  8. ncbi request reprint Green tea and the skin
    Stephen Hsu
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, School of Dentistry, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, Georgia 30912 1126, USA
    J Am Acad Dermatol 52:1049-59. 2005
  9. ncbi request reprint Role of p21WAF1 in green tea polyphenol-induced growth arrest and apoptosis of oral carcinoma cells
    Stephen Hsu
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, School of Dentistry, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA 30912 1126, USA
    Anticancer Res 25:63-7. 2005
  10. ncbi request reprint Green tea polyphenol-induced epidermal keratinocyte differentiation is associated with coordinated expression of p57/KIP2 and caspase 14
    Stephen Hsu
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, School of Dentistry, AD1443, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA 30912 1126, USA
    J Pharmacol Exp Ther 312:884-90. 2005

Research Grants

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications21

  1. pmc Effects of oral consumption of the green tea polyphenol EGCG in a murine model for human Sjogren's syndrome, an autoimmune disease
    Kevin Gillespie
    Department of Periodontology, US Army Fort Gordon, Fort Gordon, GA, USA
    Life Sci 83:581-8. 2008
    ..Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) possesses anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and autoantigen-inhibitory properties...
  2. ncbi request reprint Chemopreventive effects of green tea polyphenols correlate with reversible induction of p57 expression
    S Hsu
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, School of Dentistry, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta 30912 1126, USA
    Anticancer Res 21:3743-8. 2001
    ..The data suggest that the chemopreventive effects of green tea polyphenols may involve p57-mediated cell cycle regulation in normal epithelial cells...
  3. ncbi request reprint Green tea polyphenol induces caspase 14 in epidermal keratinocytes via MAPK pathways and reduces psoriasiform lesions in the flaky skin mouse model
    Stephen Hsu
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, School of Dentistry, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA 30912, USA
    Exp Dermatol 16:678-84. 2007
    ..This suggests that GTP-activated pathways may be potential targets for novel therapeutic approaches to the treatment of some psoriasiform skin disorders...
  4. ncbi request reprint Expression of caspase-14 reduces tumorigenicity of skin cancer cells
    Stephen Hsu
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, School of Dentistry, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, USA
    In Vivo 21:279-83. 2007
    ..Caspase-14, a member of the caspase family associated with epithelial cell differentiation, planned cell death, and barrier formation, is induced by EGCG in normal human epidermal keratinocytes but not in cancer cells...
  5. ncbi request reprint Green tea polyphenols reduce autoimmune symptoms in a murine model for human Sjogren's syndrome and protect human salivary acinar cells from TNF-alpha-induced cytotoxicity
    Stephen D Hsu
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, School of Dentistry, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA, USA
    Autoimmunity 40:138-47. 2007
    ..In conclusion, GTPs may provide a degree of protection against autoimmune-induced tissue damage in SS, mediated in part through activation of MAPK elements...
  6. ncbi request reprint A new approach to managing oral manifestations of Sjogren's syndrome and skin manifestations of lupus
    Stephen Hsu
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, School of Dentistry, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, USA
    J Biochem Mol Biol 39:229-39. 2006
    ..This review article evaluates the currently available research data on GTPs, focusing on their potential application in the treatment of the oral manifestations of SS and skin manifestations of SLE...
  7. ncbi request reprint Inhibition of autoantigen expression by (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (the major constituent of green tea) in normal human cells
    Stephen Hsu
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, School of Dentistry, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, 30912 1126, USA
    J Pharmacol Exp Ther 315:805-11. 2005
    ..These findings, taken together with green tea's anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic effects, suggest that green tea polyphenols could serve as an important component in novel approaches to combat autoimmune disorders in humans...
  8. ncbi request reprint Green tea and the skin
    Stephen Hsu
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, School of Dentistry, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, Georgia 30912 1126, USA
    J Am Acad Dermatol 52:1049-59. 2005
    ..This article summarizes the findings of studies using green tea polyphenols as chemopreventive, natural healing, and anti-aging agents for human skin, and discusses possible mechanisms of action...
  9. ncbi request reprint Role of p21WAF1 in green tea polyphenol-induced growth arrest and apoptosis of oral carcinoma cells
    Stephen Hsu
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, School of Dentistry, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA 30912 1126, USA
    Anticancer Res 25:63-7. 2005
    ..Thus, expression of functional p21WAF1 may promote phytochemical-mediated growth arrest and apoptosis in oral carcinoma cells...
  10. ncbi request reprint Green tea polyphenol-induced epidermal keratinocyte differentiation is associated with coordinated expression of p57/KIP2 and caspase 14
    Stephen Hsu
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, School of Dentistry, AD1443, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA 30912 1126, USA
    J Pharmacol Exp Ther 312:884-90. 2005
    ..Further understanding of how EGCG modulates cellular differentiation may be useful in developing green tea preparations for selected clinical applications...
  11. ncbi request reprint Green tea polyphenols induce differentiation and proliferation in epidermal keratinocytes
    Stephen Hsu
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, School of Dentistry, AD1443 Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA 30912 1126, USA
    J Pharmacol Exp Ther 306:29-34. 2003
    ..These results suggest that tea polyphenols may be used for treatment of wounds or certain skin conditions characterized by altered cellular activities or metabolism...
  12. ncbi request reprint A mechanism-based in vitro anticancer drug screening approach for phenolic phytochemicals
    Stephen Hsu
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, School of Dentistry, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA 30912 1126, USA
    Assay Drug Dev Technol 1:611-8. 2003
    ..Tumor cell death and normal cell survival are detected simultaneously, in a device that co-cultures normal human cells adjacent to human tumor cells...
  13. ncbi request reprint Induction of apoptosis in oral cancer cells: agents and mechanisms for potential therapy and prevention
    Stephen Hsu
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, School of Dentistry, Medical College of Georgia, AD 1443, Augusta, GA 30912 1125, USA
    Oral Oncol 40:461-73. 2004
    ..This review summarizes the results of a number of investigations focused specifically on induction of apoptosis in oral cancer cells by synthetic compounds and naturally occurring chemopreventive agents with apoptotic potential...
  14. ncbi request reprint Green tea polyphenol targets the mitochondria in tumor cells inducing caspase 3-dependent apoptosis
    Stephen Hsu
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, School of Dentistry, AD1443 Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA 30912 1126, USA
    Anticancer Res 23:1533-9. 2003
    ....
  15. ncbi request reprint Transforming growth factor beta 1 dysregulation in a human oral carcinoma tumour progression model
    S Hsu
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA 30912 1126, USA
    Cell Prolif 35:183-92. 2002
    ....
  16. ncbi request reprint Induction of p57 is required for cell survival when exposed to green tea polyphenols
    Stephen Hsu
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, School of Dentistry, AD1443, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA 30912 1126, USA
    Anticancer Res 22:4115-20. 2002
    ..Our results suggest that p57/KIP2 is a determinant pro-survival factor for cell protection from green tea polyphenol-induced apoptosis...
  17. ncbi request reprint Chemoprevention of oral cancer by green tea
    Stephen D Hsu
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, School of Dentistry, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, USA
    Gen Dent 50:140-6. 2002
    ..Therefore, regular consumption of green tea could be beneficial in the prevention of oral cancer...
  18. ncbi request reprint Blue light differentially alters cellular redox properties
    Jill B Lewis
    School of Dentistry, Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, Georgia 30912, USA
    J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 72:223-9. 2005
    ..The identification of oxidative stress as a mediator of the effects of blue light is a critical first step in defining its biological risks and therapeutic opportunities...
  19. ncbi request reprint Extracellular environment as one mediator of blue light-induced mitochondrial suppression
    Shaun Rotenberg
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Biology, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA 30912 1100, USA
    Dent Mater 22:759-64. 2006
    ..The current study tested the hypothesis that the extracellular environment mediates mitochondrial suppression of oral epithelial cells and fibroblasts by blue light...
  20. ncbi request reprint Blue light generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) differentially in tumor vs. normal epithelial cells
    Daniel B Lockwood
    John S Davidson Fine Arts School, Augusta, GA, USA
    Dent Mater 21:683-8. 2005
    ....
  21. ncbi request reprint Ni(II) activates the Nrf2 signaling pathway in human monocytic cells
    Jill B Lewis
    Department of Oral Biology and Maxillofacial Pathology, AD1417, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA 30912 1126, USA
    Biomaterials 27:5348-56. 2006
    ..Because Nrf2 target gene products are known regulators of NFkappaB nuclear activity, our results suggest that Ni(II) may affect cytokine secretion indirectly via modulation of the Nrf2 pathway...

Research Grants1

  1. Identification of Green Tea Polyphenol-Targeted Genes
    Stephen Hsu; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..Data generated from this proposal may reveal novel drug targets for treatment of head and neck cancer. ..