David A Baker

Summary

Affiliation: Medical University of South Carolina
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Cystine/glutamate exchange serves as the source for extracellular glutamate: modifications by repeated cocaine administration
    D A Baker
    Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston South Carolina 29425, USA
    Amino Acids 23:161-2. 2002
  2. ncbi request reprint The origin and neuronal function of in vivo nonsynaptic glutamate
    David A Baker
    Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina 29425, USA
    J Neurosci 22:9134-41. 2002
  3. ncbi request reprint N-acetyl cysteine-induced blockade of cocaine-induced reinstatement
    David A Baker
    Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina 29425, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1003:349-51. 2003
  4. ncbi request reprint Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors modulate extracellular glutamate in the nucleus accumbens
    Zheng Xiong Xi
    Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina 29425, USA
    J Pharmacol Exp Ther 300:162-71. 2002
  5. ncbi request reprint Inhibition of non-vesicular glutamate release by group III metabotropic glutamate receptors in the nucleus accumbens
    Zheng Xiong Xi
    Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA
    J Neurochem 87:1204-12. 2003
  6. ncbi request reprint Neuroadaptations in cystine-glutamate exchange underlie cocaine relapse
    David A Baker
    Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina 29425, USA
    Nat Neurosci 6:743-9. 2003
  7. ncbi request reprint Modulation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling by chronic cocaine
    Zheng Xiong Xi
    Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, Medical University of South Carolina, 173 Ashley Avenue, BSB 403, Charleston, SC 29464, USA
    J Pharmacol Exp Ther 303:608-15. 2002
  8. ncbi request reprint The temporal sequence of changes in gene expression by drugs of abuse
    Peter W Kalivas
    Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA
    Methods Mol Med 79:3-11. 2003
  9. pmc Repeated N-acetylcysteine administration alters plasticity-dependent effects of cocaine
    Aric Madayag
    Department of Biomedical Sciences, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233, USA
    J Neurosci 27:13968-76. 2007
  10. ncbi request reprint Stressor- and corticotropin releasing factor-induced reinstatement and active stress-related behavioral responses are augmented following long-access cocaine self-administration by rats
    John R Mantsch
    Department of Biomedical Sciences, Marquette University, Schroeder Health Complex, P O Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI 53201 1881, USA
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 195:591-603. 2008

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications19

  1. ncbi request reprint Cystine/glutamate exchange serves as the source for extracellular glutamate: modifications by repeated cocaine administration
    D A Baker
    Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston South Carolina 29425, USA
    Amino Acids 23:161-2. 2002
    ..The studies presented reveal that this long-term neuroadaptation elicited by repeated cocaine results from a decrease in the activity of cystine/glutamate exchange...
  2. ncbi request reprint The origin and neuronal function of in vivo nonsynaptic glutamate
    David A Baker
    Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina 29425, USA
    J Neurosci 22:9134-41. 2002
    ..These results suggest that nonvesicular release from the cystine-glutamate antiporter is the primary source of in vivo extracellular glutamate and that this glutamate can modulate both glutamate and dopamine transmission...
  3. ncbi request reprint N-acetyl cysteine-induced blockade of cocaine-induced reinstatement
    David A Baker
    Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina 29425, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1003:349-51. 2003
  4. ncbi request reprint Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors modulate extracellular glutamate in the nucleus accumbens
    Zheng Xiong Xi
    Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina 29425, USA
    J Pharmacol Exp Ther 300:162-71. 2002
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint Inhibition of non-vesicular glutamate release by group III metabotropic glutamate receptors in the nucleus accumbens
    Zheng Xiong Xi
    Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA
    J Neurochem 87:1204-12. 2003
    ..Together, these data indicate that group III mGluRs regulate in vivo extracellular glutamate in the nucleus accumbens by inhibiting non-vesicular glutamate release...
  6. ncbi request reprint Neuroadaptations in cystine-glutamate exchange underlie cocaine relapse
    David A Baker
    Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina 29425, USA
    Nat Neurosci 6:743-9. 2003
    ..Thus, withdrawal from repeated cocaine increases susceptibility to relapse in part by reducing cystine/glutamate exchange, and restoring exchanger activity prevents cocaine-primed drug seeking...
  7. ncbi request reprint Modulation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling by chronic cocaine
    Zheng Xiong Xi
    Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, Medical University of South Carolina, 173 Ashley Avenue, BSB 403, Charleston, SC 29464, USA
    J Pharmacol Exp Ther 303:608-15. 2002
    ..Together, these data demonstrate that repeated cocaine produces an enduring reduction in mGluR2/3 function in the nucleus accumbens...
  8. ncbi request reprint The temporal sequence of changes in gene expression by drugs of abuse
    Peter W Kalivas
    Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA
    Methods Mol Med 79:3-11. 2003
  9. pmc Repeated N-acetylcysteine administration alters plasticity-dependent effects of cocaine
    Aric Madayag
    Department of Biomedical Sciences, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233, USA
    J Neurosci 27:13968-76. 2007
    ....
  10. ncbi request reprint Stressor- and corticotropin releasing factor-induced reinstatement and active stress-related behavioral responses are augmented following long-access cocaine self-administration by rats
    John R Mantsch
    Department of Biomedical Sciences, Marquette University, Schroeder Health Complex, P O Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI 53201 1881, USA
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 195:591-603. 2008
    ..Excessive cocaine use may increase susceptibility to stressor-induced relapse through alterations in brain corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) responsiveness...
  11. ncbi request reprint Contribution of cystine-glutamate antiporters to the psychotomimetic effects of phencyclidine
    David A Baker
    Department of Biomedical Sciences, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53233, USA
    Neuropsychopharmacology 33:1760-72. 2008
    ..These data advance cystine-glutamate antiporters as novel targets capable of reversing the psychotomimetic effects of PCP...
  12. pmc Daily cocaine self-administration under long-access conditions augments restraint-induced increases in plasma corticosterone and impairs glucocorticoid receptor-mediated negative feedback in rats
    John R Mantsch
    Department of Biomedical Sciences, Box 1881, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53201 1881, USA
    Brain Res 1167:101-11. 2007
    ..The findings suggest that cocaine use produces persistent changes in individual responsiveness to stressors that may contribute to the addiction process...
  13. ncbi request reprint Surgical adrenalectomy with diurnal corticosterone replacement slows escalation and prevents the augmentation of cocaine-induced reinstatement in rats self-administering cocaine under long-access conditions
    John R Mantsch
    Department of Biomedical Sciences, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53201, USA
    Neuropsychopharmacology 33:814-26. 2008
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint Levo-tetrahydropalmatine attenuates cocaine self-administration and cocaine-induced reinstatement in rats
    John R Mantsch
    Department of Biomedical Sciences, Marquette University, Schroeder Health Complex, P O Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI 53201 1881, USA
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 192:581-91. 2007
    ..Accordingly, l-THP has been reported to reduce heroin craving and relapse in recovering addicts...
  15. ncbi request reprint Adenylyl and guanylyl cyclases from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum
    David A Baker
    Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK
    IUBMB Life 56:535-40. 2004
    ..Study of these enzymes could therefore lead to novel strategies for anti-malarial intervention in addition to providing unique insights into the intriguing biology of the parasite...
  16. ncbi request reprint Structure, function and evolution of microbial adenylyl and guanylyl cyclases
    David A Baker
    Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK
    Mol Microbiol 52:1229-42. 2004
    ..A review is timely because the explosion of data from the various genome projects is providing new and exciting insights into protein function and evolution...
  17. ncbi request reprint Purine nucleotide cyclases in the malaria parasite
    David A Baker
    Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK
    Trends Parasitol 20:227-32. 2004
  18. ncbi request reprint Multiple splice variants encode a novel adenylyl cyclase of possible plastid origin expressed in the sexual stage of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum
    David K Muhia
    Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, WC1E 7HT, United Kingdom
    J Biol Chem 278:22014-22. 2003
    ....
  19. pmc Gametogenesis in malaria parasites is mediated by the cGMP-dependent protein kinase
    Louisa McRobert
    Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom
    PLoS Biol 6:e139. 2008
    ..falciparum, and demonstrates the feasibility of selective inhibition of a crucial regulator of the malaria parasite life cycle...